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//w? a/r reservist 

Vol. XV— No. 1 Jan. 1963 

AIR FORCE RESERVE 
CIVIL AIR PATROL AIR NATIONAL GUARD 



General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Chester E. McCarty 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 



EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 



The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of HQ USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, D.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq. USAF. 



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the air rosory/st 



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DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCI 

Office of the Chief of Staff 

United States Air Force 

washington. d.c. 



subject: Aerospace Power in the Cuban Crisis 

to: Air Force Reservists and Air Guardsmen 

I am sure that you are aware of my appreciation am 
that of the Secretary for the magnificent respons 
of the Air Reserve Forces in the Cuban crisis, 
know of no comparable examples in the history o 
reserve forces to match this callup and the eve 
larger one in the Berlin crisis of 1961. Thes 
forces were trained and ready. They were trul 
forces in being. 

A major lesson to be learned from the Cuban crisi 
is that it was the threat of aeros pace weapons i 
Cuba that galvanized our Nation to action — an 
our superior total aerospace power was a majo 
factor that enabled our Nation confidently to de 
mand removal of the threat. Power such as this mus 
be better understood by all Americans. 

The flexibility — the quick responsiveness an 
versatility — of our areospace power was demon 
strated globally during the Cuban crisis. It wa 
demonstrated not only by the intensified ground an 
airborne and missile alert operations of our stra 
tegic aerospace forces, but by our heightene 
aerospace defense readiness, our huge emergenc 
airlift operations, our rapid deployment of tacti 
cal air forces to Florida bases, our quick-reactir 
Air Reserve Forces, our aerial surveillance c 
Cuba, our responsive logistics system, and oi 
global communications for command and control c 
aerospace forces at many places on the planet 
Our aerospace power was being exercised throughoi 
the world during the crisis, and awareness of it 
capability had its effect well beyond Cuba. 

The task of meeting all military threats to nation* 
security requires unity of effort among the Nation' 
land, sea and aerospace arms. It is not a oni 
Service job. Each Service — and each componei 
of each Service — must contribute, but withoi 
duplication. 



General, USAF 
Chief of Staff 



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IAJ. GEN. CURTIS R. LOW, USAF, 
ss been named to succeed Maj. 
en. Chester E. McCarty as the 
sst. Chief of Staff, Reserve Forces, 
Tective February 1963. Gen. Mc- 
arty goes to Wiesbaden, Germany 
; Chief of Staff, U. S. Air Forces in 
jrope (USAFE). Gen. Low (a com- 
and pilot with more than 4,000 
/ing hours) leaves Ent AFB, Colo., 
here he was assistant chief of 
aff NORAD CONAD. 

1 COL. BRUCE G. SUNDLUN, Wash- 
gton, D. C, lawyer was among 13 
rominent citizens named incor- 
arators of the new Communica- 
3ns Satellite Corp., created by the 
. S. to establish an international 
■stem of satellite communications, 
is M-Day assignment is Deputy 
ssistant Director, Legislative Liai- 
m, Office of the Secretary of the 
ir Force. 

AJ. THOMAS C. BROWN JR., was 

•lected as the nation's Most Out- 



standing Liaison Officer Coordinator 
for 1962 at a recent Air Force Acad- 
emy Liaison Officer Conference. A 
Griffin, Georgia businessman, Major 
Brown has been connected with the 
Academy's Liaison Officer Program 
since 1958. He holds a Reserve 
Mobilization assignment with the 
Continental Air Command. 

CAPT. FREDERICK L. DECKER, 123rd 
FISq., Oregon Air National Guard, 
recently was awarded the Air Medal 
for "heroic action" during a flight 
last February. Despite indication 
of fire, Captain Decker remained 
with his crippled F-89J over a pop- 
ulated area "when he would have 
been fully justified in leaving the 
aircraft . . . ," according to his 
citation. 

SMSGT. GRANT S. WILLIAMS SR., 

sergeant major for Hq., 2nd Air 
Force Reserve Region at Andrews 
AFB, Md., has been awarded Con- 
tinental Air Command's Certificate 



of Recognition. Williams received 
the award for establishing new pro- 
cedures in administrative manage- 
ment that were without precedent, 
while serving as NCOIC of the Ad- 
ministrative Section for the 2491st 
Air Force Reserve Sector, Grenier 
Field, N.H., during the period of 
September 1961 to July 1962. 

TSGT. WILLIAM T. ALLEN and A1C 
HUGO MADAUS, assigned to the 
403rd TCWg., Selfridge AFB, Mich., 
may have established a record for 
Air Reservists called for the Cuban 
crisis. Their combined age is 133 
years. Allen is 67, while Madaus 
is a youngster of 66. Following their 
short tour of duty, both returned 
to their civilian jobs at Selfridge 
AFB. The October callup marked the 
first time either man had been on 
active duty with the USAF. Sergeant 
Allen, however, had previous mili- 
tary service as a pilot in Britain's 
Royal Flying Corps during World 
War I. 






Maj. Gen. Low 



Lt. Col. Sundlun 



Maj. Brown 






Capt. Decker 



SMSGT. Williams 



TSgl. Allen 



PEOPLE 




A1C Madaus 



"readiness". . ."versatility". . ."global capability" — 

growing factors in our Air Reserve Forces which prove invaluable 



to the major air commands. 



Hong Kong 




T 



_ he Air National Guard completed its first 
round-the-world flight in November. 

On the same mission, the Air Guard crew 
from the 125th Air Transport Squadron at Tulsa, 
Okla., also carried out the Air Guard's first dip- 
lomatic mission — the delivery of 14 cattle to the 
King of Afghanistan. 

In accomplishing the two "firsts" for the Air 
Guard, the mission proved not only that the global 
capability of the Guard is a fact, but also that 
the Guard is becoming a more versatile, readily 
available force all the time. 

This particular mission, of course, was flown 
by an Air Guard unit assigned to the Military Air 



L 






Transport Service. And the MATS-assigned units 
have been achieving spectacular successes almost 
from the day they joined that globe-trotting com- 
mand in early 1960. 

Today, there are 23 squadrons assigned to 
MATS, 7 of which are aeromedical squadrons. 
Six squadrons were called to active duty in Berlin. 
In the Berlin mobilization, Air Guard crews 
flew missions to virtually every continent on the 
globe. And by the end of their year-long tour, 
some of the units were flying twice the number 
of hours for which they had been programmed. 
This brought the highest praise from Lt. Gen. 
Joe W. Kelly, MATS commander, and from Maj. 
Gen. Winston P. Wilson, deputy chief, National 
Guard Bureau. 

Hardly had some of those units been returned 
to state status before they were called upon once 
again in the Cuban crisis. Altogether, Air Guard 
units flew nearly 30 special missions for the Aii 
Force, carrying cargo and equipment on runs from 
which regular MATS aircraft and crews had beer 
pulled to meet higher priority projects. 

One of the spectacular features of the Cubar 
assignments was that Air Guard crews flew intc 
Thule, Greenland without having had a route 
check. They are reported to be the first MATS 
crews ever to have been assigned such a missior 
without a route check. And the Air Guard crew: 
made numerous flights into that ice-covered are; 
without incident. Besides flying to Thule, th< 
Air Guardsmen made flights to Chile, Greenland 
France, Spain, Germany and Bermuda. 

Even without a crisis, however, the Ai 
Guardsmen assigned to MATS maintain thei 
proficiency on overseas flights through periodii 
flights on those routes on weekends and durinj 
their "summer field training" of two weeks. 

On the round-the-world flight, the crew fron 
Tulsa flew through McGuire AFB, N.J.; Laje 
in the Azores; Wheelus AFB, Tripoli; Adana 
Turkey; Kabul, Afghanistan; Lahore, Pakistan 
New Delhi, India; Bangkok, Thailand; Hon 
Kong; Tokyo, Japan; Wake Island; Hickam AFB 
Hawaii; Travis AFB, Calif., and back to Tulsa- 
more than 24,000 statute miles and an eve 
100 hours flying time. 

The big Oklahoma Air Guard C-97 won th 
name "Bovine Boeing" from the first phase of it 
mission, the delivery of the cattle for the peopl 
of Afghanistan. The cattle were gifts from ind 



The Air Guard In MATS' System 



Delivering radar gear half way around the world 
for Guardsmen of 109th ATGp., Schenectady, N.Y. 



vidual cattle breeders in the United States who 
donated the prize Jerseys and Brown Swiss as 
part of the President's People-to-People program. 

The aircraft commander in command of the 
plane and crew was Maj. Frank L. Slane. Other 
crew members included Capt. Bobby E. Walls, al- 
ternate aircraft commander; Capt. James W. Mor- 
gan Jr., pilot; Lt. Donald E. Anderson, pilot; 
Capt. Joseph P. Rowe, navigator; Lt. John W. 
Latimer, navigator; CMSgt. William A. McLeod, 
MSgt. Thomas I. Tucker and MSgt. Jake C. Dod- 
son, flight engineers; MSgt. Hugh J. Roberts, en- 
gine specialist, and SSgt. Roger B. Smith, load- 
master. 

Also aboard were Mr. Fred M. Lege, live- 
stock marketing specialist with the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, who looked after the cattle, 
and Maj. James C. Elliott, National Guard Bu- 
reau representative. 

The mission marked the first time the Air 
Guard had flown any cattle, and one newspaper, 
turning the words of a widely-quoted phrase, 
described the details as a "herd shot 'round the 
world." 

The cows were not, however, the first animals 
carried by the Air Guard. On previous missions, 
Air Guardsmen have flown guinea pigs, birds 
and, on one mision, even some rats. Air Guard 
crews have flown a number of mercy missions 
in many areas, carrying medicine or patients 
whose lives might not have been spared without 
aerial assistance. 

During the recent scare in Louisiana where 
some chlorine barges sank in the Mississippi, the 
Air Guard flew in thousands of gas masks for 
the protection of the citizens. The Air Guard 
has flown a space capsule, helicopters, missiles 
and people. 

The Air Guard, too, maintains and operates 
what it calls the "Talking Bird," a C-97 that is 
utilized as a flying command post. 

The "Talking Bird" has gone on many 
global missions on a variety of assignments, 
including the support of Presidential trips. The 
airplane, assigned to the Oklahoma Air National 
Guard unit, Oklahoma City, is maintained on an 
alert status at all times, ready to go on a moment's 
notice. During 1961 alone, the "Talking Bird" 
logged some 350 flying hours and travelled 66,000 
miles. It visited 22 different countries. 

see next page 







Not all missions were overseas. Mississippi's 183rd Aeromedical Evacuation Sq., 
worked with MATS removing ill and aged from gas-threatened Natchez, Miss. 



Another ANG squadron active with MATS was the 109th ATSq., 
Minnesota. Lfs. Abraham and Morrill examine map during stop. 




Wake hla^4 




■ MATS System from page 5 

Thus, while the Air Guardsmen already have 
proved their mettle in difficult and varied missions, 
they undoubtedly will be called upon to perform many 
more. And if past performances are any criterion, the 
Air Guard can be expected to complete them with 
the same degree of success. They should continue, in 
other words, to prove that the confidence the Air Force 
has placed in the Air Guard is well taken. 

. . . "help any way you can" 

"Seven SAC B-47s will land at your base within 
three hours." This is the kind of telephone call Air 
National Guard base commanders at 26 locations 
throughout the United States began receiving the day 
of President Kennedy's speech announcing this Na- 
tion's determination to keep Russia from making 
Cuba one vast launching pad. 

It is difficult for anyone not directly associated 
with one of these bases to realize just what those 
phone calls meant. None of the bases called upon 
was specifically equipped to handle the enormous 
B-47 SAC bombers or the modern ADC F-106s that 
landed so fast they needed extra runway space. But 
handle them they did, and in the style to which they 
were accustomed. 

It meant rousing fulltime Guard technicians out 
of bed in the middle of the night and setting up 24- 
hour schedules for them. It meant around-the-clock 
security guards surrounding the base and each plane, 
mess facilities to feed crews on 24-hour alert, quar- 
ters for hundreds where there was only room on base 
for 25 and barrels and barrels of coffee. 

It meant hours on the telephone until ears and 
throats were sore. "Call that civilian distributor or 
the local airport and tell them to bring every bit of 
fuel they can spare over here — I don't care if it is 
four o'clock in the morning. Call the Adjutant Gen- 
eral and ask him how many trucks and buses he 
can spare. Call all the motels in town and find out 
how many rooms they can rent — we don't even have 
enough tents for the number of men coming. Call 
those ladies who cooked for us last field training 
session and see if they can give us a hand now." 

Nearly 200 SAC and ADC aircraft dropped into 
those 26 ANG bases before it was over and most 
stayed for two or three weeks. As soon as their wheels 
touched the ground, Air Guardsmen were there to 
refuel them, check them out, and have them ready 
to take to the skies again should the need arise. The 
Air Guard was ready on this occasion as it has al- 
ways been ready for any emergency. 

It had received large numbers of aircraft before 
during training exercises. But none had been so large 
or as fast as those ADC and SAC were sending in. 
Special problems arose. What does a base commander 
do, whose runways arc built for comparatively light 
weight fighter planes, when he finds that after two 
days of sitting in one place fantastically heavy B-47 
bombers have sunk up to eight inches into the asphalt 
of the runway' 7 First he tries moving the aircraft 
around frequently— ends by putting steel plates under 
the wheels. Bases that received ADC aircraft had to 
have special 'scramble" telephones and ADC alert 
alarm systems installed. 

Support of SAC and ADC aircraft was not the 
only contribution the Air Guard made in connection 
with the Cuban crisis. ANG transport aircraft car- 



ried troops and equipment all over the world — one 
unit alone carried over 90,000 pounds of cargo in 
less than two weeks. Other Air Guard units lent all 
kinds of equipment — even aircraft — to active units 
to help them out during their crash alert program. 
Air Guardsmen from communication units offered 
their services to active units — some working nights 
with active Air Force units while continuing their 
regular jobs during the day. 

The key word was cooperation. The word came 
down from the National Guard Bureau, "Help them 
any way and every way you can." But the message 
was unnecessary for any active Air Force man who 
has contact with the ANG knows they are always 
ready and eager to help out any way they can. 



'instant airmen reorganize 



The Air National Guard's "instant airmen" who 
performed so spectacularly during the 1961 Berlin 
crisis have undergone a major reorganization. 

Seven tactical flying wings of the Air Guard 
began an organizational streamlining shortly after last 
summer's demobilization and completed it by the 
first of the year. This is a building block concept, de- 
signed for greater unit flexibility and increased re- 
sponsiveness to either limited or general war. 

Further, the reorganization will bring Air Guard 
units into closer conformity with the new Tactical 
Air Command force structure and, at the same time, 
will meet increased operational requirements. 

A similar reorganization is underway throughout 
the active Air Force and will subsequently be applied 
to Air Guard Air Defense and MATS units. 

Underlying the new plan is the basic assump- 
tion that, while Air Guard units — rather than indi- 
viduals — will be called in any emergency, the units 
will not necessarily be of wing size. This places a 
requirement on all units to be highly self-sufficient. 

The group concept is unique to the Air Guard, 
and was instituted in recognition of the Guard's 
unique organizational characteristics. Those are, that, 
unlike the active Air Force, Air Guard wings seldom 
have all of their flying units on the same base. In 
fact, most of them are located in three or four sep- 
arate geographical areas. Placing each flying squadron 
under a group allows them to function independently 
while still operating under the command of the wing. 

To further increase their independent capa- 
bilities, the reorganization has organized the groups 
under the Double Deputy System. This, in effect, 
gives to the groups many of the operational respon- 
sibilities formerly assigned to wing headquarters. 

The primary purpose of the plan is to provide 
complete flexibility to the Tactical Air Command to 
which these units are assigned; to give TAC what it 
needs, when it needs it. Depending on the nature 
of an emergency, TAC may have an immediate re- 
quirement for entire wings, for individual groups, or 
for only flying squadrons. The Air Guard now has 
the capability of meeting any of these requirements. 

This fact, says Maj. Gen. Winston P. Wilson, 
deputy chief of the National Guard Bureau in Wash- 
ington, "gives special significance to the plan. Ulti- 
mately, it is not how it looks on paper, but how it 
enables you to produce trained manpower and ready 
equipment that makes any reorganization meaningful. 
This reorganization fills the bill." 



"Take Six" or " 



Try One" 



T, 



he "Take Six" program, under which non-prior 
service recruits take six months training, will soon 
have a partner program in the Air National Guard, 
known as "Try One." 

The "Try One" program will be aimed at for- 
mer servicemen who are not acquainted with the Air 
National Guard. Guard Bureau officials believe that 
many of those persons not acquainted with the Air 
Guard program fail to sign up because of the length 
of the tour, in the past, three years. 

Under the "Try One" program, former service- 
men will be permitted to sign for a one-year tour in the 
highest grade they held on active duty. 

Purpose of the new program is to bring addi- 
tional personnel into the Air Guard inventory, de- 
pleted considerably when many men called to active 
duty for the Berlin crisis remained on active duty 
with the Air Force. 

In addition to the requirement for enlisted per- 
sonnel, the Air Guard particularly needs pilots and 
higher grade enlisted men. Nearly 300 Guard pilots, 
most of them jet fighter pilots, remained in the Air 
Force to fill positions in new tactical fighter wings 
being formed by the Tactical Air Command. Many 
others went into the Military Air Transport Service. 

Flying slots in the Guard's 92 flying units are 
open to lieutenants and captains in any cockpit po- 
sitions. Majors and higher ranking officers are lim- 
ited to units that have position vacancies in those 
ranks. 

Air Guard Locations 

Alabama: Birmingham, Montgomery, Tac Recon 
(TR) RF84Fs; Dothan, ACW; Gadsden, Radio 
Relay. 

Alaska: Anchorage, Air Transport C123Js. 

Arizona: Phoenix, Air Transport C97s; Tucson, FI 
FlOOs. 

Arkansas: Fort Smith, TR F84Fs; Hot Springs, Radio 
Relay; Little Rock, TR RB57A/Es. 

California: Compton, Comm Tributary (Trib) Team; 
Fresno, Fl F86Ls; Hayward, Troop Carrier (TC) 
SA16A/Bs, GEEIA, Mobile Comm Flight, 
Band; North Highlands, Comm Trib Team; 
Ontario, FI F86Ls, Weather Flight; Sacramento, 
State Hqs; Santa Ana, Radio Relay; Van Nuys, 
Relay Center, Weather Flight, Band, Heavy 
Transport C97s, Air Evac. 

Colorado: Denver, Tac Fighter (TF) FlOOs, Mobile 
Comm Flight, Band, ACW. 

Connecticut: Hartford, State Hqs; Orange, ACW; 
Windsor Locks, FI F 100 As. 

Delaware: Wilmington, State Hqs; New Castle, Heavy 
Transport C97s. 

District of Columbia: Washington, TF FlOOCs, Mo- 
bile Comm Sq, Weather Flight. 

Florida: Jacksonville, FI F 102 As; St. Augustine, State 
Hqs. 

Georgia: Atlanta, State Hqs; Macon, Comm Main- 
tenance; Marietta, Savannah, Heavy Transport 
C97s, ACW, Band; St. Simons Island, Radio 
Relay; Savannah, ACW. 

Hawaii: Ft.Ruger,State Hqs; Hickam AFB, FI F102As 



Koko Crater, ACW; Punamano-Kokee, ACW. 
Idaho: Boise, F86Ls. 

Illinois: Chicago, GEEIA, Air Refueling KC97s, 
Comm Trib Team, Band; Peoria, Springfield, 
TF F84Fs. 

Indiana: Ft. Wayne, TF, RF84Fs, Weather Flight, 
Mobile Comm Flight; Indianapolis, State Hqs; 
Terre Haute, TF RF84Fs, Weather Flight. 

Iowa: Des Moines, Fl F89Js; Fort Dodge, ACW; 
Sioux City, TF FlOOCs. 

Kansas: Hutchinson, TR RB57A/Cs; Topeka, State 
Hqs; Wichita, TF FlOOCs, Weather Flight. 

Kentucky: Frankfort, State Hqs; Louisville, TR 
RB57B/Cs, Weather Flight. 

Louisiana: Hammond, Mobile Comm Flight; New 
Orleans, FI F102As, Weather Flight, GEEIA. 

Maine: Augusta, State Hqs; Bangor, FI F89Js; Port- 
land, GEEIA, Radio Relay. 

Maryland: Baltimore, TC SA16A/Bs, TF F86Hs, 
Weather Flight. 

Massachusetts: Boston, TF F86Hs, Weather Flight, 
Band; Falmouth, Field Training Site; Wellesley, 
Mobile Comm Gp Hqs, Relay Center; Westfield, 
TF F86Hs, Weather Flight; Worcester, ACW, 
GEEIA. 

Michigan: Alpena, Field Training Site; Battle Creek, 
TR RB57A/Es; Detroit, TR RF84Fs, Weather 
Flight; Lansing, State Hqs. 

Minnesota: Duluth, FI F89Js; Minneapolis-St. Paul, 
Heavy Transport C97s, Mobile Comm Flight, 
Air Evac Sq. 

Mississippi: Gulfport, Field Training Site; Jackson, 
Aeromed Transport CI 2 Is; Meridian TR 
RF84Fs, Mobile Comm Flight, Tower Oper- 
ations. 

Missouri: Jefferson City, State Hqs; St. Joseph, Heavy 
Transport, C97s, Aero Evac; St. Louis, TF 
FlOOCs, Mobile Comm Flight, Band, TAC Con- 
trol Hqs; GEEIA. 

Montana: Great Falls, FI F89Js; Helena, State Hqs. 

Nebraska: Lincoln, Fl F86Ls. 

Nevada: Carson City, State Hqs; Reno, TR 
RB57B/Cs. 

New Hampshire: Concord, State Hqs; Manchester, 
Heavy Transport C97s, Air Evac. 

New Jersey: Atlantic City, McGuire AFB, TF F86Hs; 
Newark, Aeromed Transport CI 2 Is, Weather 
Flight; Trenton, State Hqs. 

New Mexico: Kirtland AFB, FlOOAs; Santa Fe, State 
Hqs. 

New York: White Plains, Brooklyn, Aeromed Trans- 
port C97s, Niagara Falls, TF FlOOCs; Roslyn, 
GEEIA, Band, Comm Trib Team, Control 
Group Hqs; Schenectady, Heavy Transport, 
C97s, Air Evac; Syracuse, TF F86Hs, ACW. 

North Carolina: Badin-Wadesboro, Comm Trib Team; 
Charlotte, Aeromed Transport CI 2 Is. 

North Dakota: Bismarck, State Hqs; Fargo, FI F89Js. 

Ohio: Blue Ash, ACW; Clinton County AFB, Air 
Refueling KC97s; Columbus, FlOOCs; Mans- 
field, Springfield, Toledo, TF F84Fs; Mansfield, 
Weather Fit; Springfield, Comm Relay Center, 
Tower Operations, Mobile Comm Hqs; Zanes- 
ville, Comm Relay Center. 

see LOCATIONS page 10 



Kftfii 



H 



/ 



the reserve forces policy board is an ini 



A Voice In Policy 



J_ he Reserve Forces Policy Board is a statutory 
Board established by law as, ". . . the principal policy 
adviser to the Secretary of Defense on matters per- 
taining to the Reserve components." 

The birth of the Reserve Forces Policy Board 
came as a result of the experience gained during the 
years of World War II. It was then that the need for 
unified and concerted efforts in the shaping of Re- 
serve affairs was realized, and following passage of 
the National Security Act of 1947, the Secretary of 
Defense appointed a "Committee on Civilian Com- 
ponents" to make a detailed study along those lines. 
As a result of that study, the Secretary of De- 
fense (with the backing and active interest of the 
President of our country) created what was then 
known as the Civilian Components Policy Board, with 
the responsibility of developing coordinated policies 
and supervising the execution of the plans and pro- 
grams of the Reserve Forces. In its initial years this 
body had functions which were broadly operational 
as well as advisory, however growth and successive 
reorganizations of the Department of Defense have 
resulted in the elimination of the Board's operational 
responsibilities — permitting complete concentration on 
its primary function as policy adviser to the Secretary 
of Defense. 

The operational activities previously conducted 
by the Board are now accomplished by the Direc- 
torate for Reserve Affairs and Readiness Planning 
of the Office, Asst. Secretary of Defense (Manpower). 
On June 13, 1951, the Secretary of Defense 
abolished the Civilian Components Policy Board, and 
established in its place the present Reserve Forces 
Policy Board. The chairman of the Civilian Com- 
ponents Policy Board was appointed as chairman of 
the new Board, and its initial membership consisted 
of the then members of the old Board. The person- 
nel, records, committees and the then current work 
was also transferred to the Board. 

In essence, the Board operates as an integral part 
of the Secretary of Defense "Team," being housed in 
and working closely with the Office of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense (Manpower). 

The majority of the Board's members arc them- 
selves, Reservists. They are high ranking officers with 
a history of long, continuous and active participation 
in Reserve activities, and they are men whose military 
backgrounds prove they possess the necessary attri- 
butes for the effective representation of their Reserve 
components. However, the effective operation of the 
Board requires that each member act in the best in- 
terest of the total national security program, rather 
than that of his particular service or component, when 



this conflicts with the greater objective. 

In its operation, the Board may perform its basic 
mission in one of several ways: (1) it may, by Defense 
Department request, conduct research, compile in- 
formation, render opinions upon which are based 
final and informed decisions. (2) It may, at the request 
of one branch of the military, perform similar studies, 
following with recommendations that are representa- 
tive of the overall military posture. (3) It may serve 
as a screening board for the purpose of evaluating 
the proposals of the various, subordinate Reserve 
Forces policy committees. 

The Board serves as the primary means by 
which the Secretary can bring into consideration the 
views of the non-active-duty Reservist, upon whom 
he depends for the effective execution of the policies 
he adopts. Actually, the member qualities of the 
Board, make available to the Secretary, the concensus 
of senior, responsible representatives of the military 
departments, and of the Regular and Reserve Forces 
to aid him in reaching his decisions. 

Basically, the Board contributes to decision mak- 
ing, to policy development, support and understand- 
ing, and provides accurate conceptions of the atti- 
tudes of Reservists and of the bases and effects of 
these attitudes. Finally it serves as an informed source 
of information concerning the best way to accom- 
plish directed or agreed ends, to check against hast} 
or undesirable action, and provides effective strength 
for gaining acceptance and support for Defense De- 
partment Reserve policies. 

As prescribed by law, the Board consists of t 
civilian Chairman (Mr. John Slezak) and 20 mem- 
bers, one of whom must be an active duty Reserve 
officer of general or flag officer grade appointed b) 
the chairman, with the approval of the Secretary o 
Defense, and shall act as military adviser to the chair 
man and serve as executive officer of the Board with 
out vote. Maj. Gen. Ralph A. Palladino, USAR 
currently fills this position, serving as the militar 
executive of the Board, and providing the continuit; 
essential to the Board's activities. As the active dut; 
representative of the Board, General Palladino is als< 
charged with the responsibility of acting for the chair 
man during his absence. 

The other members of the Reserve Forces Polic 
Board consists of the under secretary of each militar 
department (Hon. Joseph V. Charyk, for USAF; 
a regular general officer of each military depart 
ment (Maj. Gen. Cecil H. Childre, USAF); two Arm 
and two Air National Guard general officers (Brij 
Gen. Allison Maxwell, ANGUS and Brig. Gen. Wil 
liam W. Spruance, ANGUS); two Army,' Navy, M; 



he Secretary of Defense "team 



7 




rine, and Air Force Reserve general officers (Maj. 
Gen. John H. Foster, AFRes and Brig. Gen. Joseph 
T. Benedict, AFRes), and a Coast Guard flag of- 
ficer who is not a voting member. 

The Board meets as often as the occasion de- 
mands, and upon the call of the chairman for one 
or more days at a time. Since its inception, the Board 
has met approximately four or five times each year. 
In addition to the member-composition of the 
Board, the military executive has at his disposal the 
services of a permanent staff which consists of a 
civilian director, a secretary and two other civilian 
employees. 

It also has a counsel who is the assistant gen- 
eral counsel (Manpower), and whose duties with the 
Board are additional duties; as well as one officer each 
from the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and the U. S. Air 
Force (represented by Lt. Col. William H. Parrott), 
who are designated for liaison duty as an additional 
duty with the Board in the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense. These officers, as additional duty, are re- 
sponsible for such functions as the development of 
agenda for Board meetings, their service coordina- 
tion of policies affecting the Reserve Forces, partici- 
pation in ad hoc committees for special studies, and 
responding to inquiries as directed by the military 
executive of the Board. 

The specific duties of the Reserve Forces Policy 
Board are many and varied, ranging from developing 
and recommending policies dealing with the organiza- 
tion, training, activation and supply of Reserve units 
to submitting recommendations on all new legislation 
or changes in existing law affecting the Reserve 
Forces. It develops and recommends policies relating 
to Reserve Officers Training Corps programs of the 
military departments, and finally, it prepares a re- 
port on the status of the Reserve programs of the 
Department of Defense for inclusion as a chapter in 
the annual official report of the Secretary of Defense 
to the President and Congress. 

Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara re- 
cently paid tribute to the value and effectiveness of 
the Reserve Forces Policy Board in a letter to each 
of the military service secretaries. A portion of that 
letter follows: "I wish to re-affirm the importance 1 
attach to the role and functions of the Reserve Forces 
Policy Board, and to request your continuing personal 
interest in supporting its effectiveness, both through 
the participation of your Under Secretary and reg- 
ular officer members, and also in your choice of the 
most able reserve officers whom you recommend for 
me to consider and designate to Board membership 
positions in accordance with law." 






Dr. Charyk 




"^"^rVj Mr. Slezak 






Maj. Gen. Palladino 



Maj. Gen. Childre 



I 




Brig. Gen. Maxwell 




Brig. Gen. Spruance 





Brig. Gen. Benedict 



Maj. Gen. Foster 



When decisions are made on Reserve Forces 
matters, both at Department of Defense and De- 
partment of the Air Force level, they usually in- 
corporate the advice of informed members of the 
Reserve Forces. In this article we examine the 
role played in the decision-making process by 
the Reserve Forces Policy Board. Subsequent ar- 
ticles will deal with the Air Reservists' voice in 
policy at Department of the Air Force level and 
within the major air commands. 



u est ions & 
j\nswers 



This column is designed to clarify problems of general 
interest to members of the Air Reserve Forces. Personal 
problems should be discussed with your unit personnel 
officer. Letters not used in the column cannot be answered. 



Upon completion of training and acceptance of a 
Reserve appointment or induction, do doctors, den- 
tists and allied specialists (over 26 with no prior 
service) acquire a service obligation? Upon com- 
pletion of training, Title 50, USC Appendix 454 sets 
forth a special liability for special registration and induc- 
tion for not more than 24 months active duty. If inducted, 
special registrants need not serve longer than if they had 
accepted a commission and were called as a Reservist. 

/ have served less than one year on active duty and 
am currently serving in a draft-deferred status. 
What is the length of my military service obligation 
and what are the Reserve participation require- 
ments? Non-prior service personnel enlisted, inducted or 
appointed before reaching age 26, acquired a military 
service obligation of six or eight years according to age 
at time of enlistment, if entry came on or after August 
10, 1955. The obligation is eight years for those entering 
between June 19, 1951 and August 9, 1955. There are 
a few exceptions to the above. To be certain, make contact 
with the office that has custody of your field personnel 
records. Being draft deferred, you may be assigned to a 
Ready Reserve position. If so, you must meet the par- 
ticipation requirements of the unit to which assigned. 

After getting an early release from active duty to 
enter school, I have been informed I do not qualify 
for Standby Status. Why? To achieve Standby Status 
you must meet one of the requirements of paragraph 4, 
AFR 45-17. Suggest you contact the nearest Air Force 
Reserve unit for further clarification. 

/ have not received The AIR RESERVIST magazine for 
the past three months. Can you tell me why? How 
can I have my name restored to the mailing list? 

There are several reasons: Human error, reassignment to 
ISLRS (Inactive Status List Reserve Section) making you 
ineligible, recall to active duty, and a change of address 
that is not reported. If still eligible, notify Air Reserve 
Records Center, 3X00 York St., Denver, Colo. Include 
correct return address. 

/ was under the impression that the years that I 
served overseas during World War II counted as 
time and one half towards promotions, longevity 
and retirement. Please advise if this is still true. 

Overseas service during World War II was credited as 
time and one-half towards terminal leave promotions only. 
For longevity and Reserve retirement purposes you are 
credited with one day for each day of active Federal 
service regardless of where served. 



f served a three year enlistment, not on extended 
active duty, in the Air National Guard and upon 
discharge from the Guard was transferred to the Air 
Force Reserve to serve the remainder of my six 
year obligation. I was recently transferred to the 
Standby Reserve and have two years remaining on 
my obligation. Am I subject to call to active duty 
involuntarily under Public Law 87-736, October 30, 
1962? Yes. Inasmuch as you have not completed five 
years service, you may be transferred back to the Ready 
Reserve under paragraph 1 1, AFR 45-17 and as a Ready 
Reservist you could be involuntarily called to active duty 
prior to February 28, 1963, under Public Law 87-736 
for a period of not more than 12 months. 

I am an airline pilot. Are flying hours accumulated 
as an airline pilot creditable for Reserve points? 

No. Flying hours accumulated as an airline pilot do not 
qualify the Reservist for point credit. 



■ LOCATIONS from page 7 

Oklahoma: Oklahoma City, Heavy Transport C97s, 
Air Evac, Comm Maintenance, GEEIA; Tulsa, 
Heavy Transport C97s, Air Evac, Weather 
Flight. 

Oregon: Portland, FI F89Js, Weather Flight, Comm 
Relay Center, Radio Relay. 

Pennsylvania: Annville, State Hqs; Harrisburg, Comm 
Trib Team, GEEIA; Olmstead AFB, Aeromed 
Transport CI 2 Is, Band; Philadelphia, Heavy 
Transport C97s, Air Evac Flight, GEEIA, 
Weather Flight; Pittsburgh, FI F102s, Aeromed 
Transport C119Js, Weather Flight; State Col- 
lege, ACW. 

Puerto Rico: Punta Salinas, ACW; San Juan, FI 
F86Hs. 

Rhode Island: Howard, ACW; Providence, TC 
SA16A/Bs. 

South Carolina: Columbia, State Hqs; Eastover, FI 
F104As, Mobile Comm Fit, Tower Operations. 

South Dakota: Sioux Falls, FI F 102 As. 

Tennessee: Alcoa, ACW; Chattanooga, GEEIA; 
Knoxville, FI F104A/Bs; Nashville, Memphis, 
Heavy Transport C97s, Weather Flight. 

Texas: Austin, State Hqs; Dallas, FI F86Ls, Band, 
Weather Flight; Garland, Radio Relay; Houston, 
San Antonio, FI F 102 As, Weather Flight; La 
Porte, GEEIA; Nederland-Jefferson City-Beau- 
mont, GEEIA. 

Utah: Salt Lake City, Heavy Transport C97s, ACW. 

Vermont: Burlington, FI F89Js; Winooski, State Hqs. 

Virginia: Richmond, State Hqs; Sandston, TF F84Fs. 

Washington: Bellingham, Comm Trib Team; Camp 
Murray, State Hqs; Seattle, Comm Trib Team, 
GEEIA; Spokane, FI F89Js, Weather Flight, 
Mobile Comm Gp Hqs, Band. 

West Virginia: Charleston, TC SA16A/Bs, Weather 
Flight; Martinsburg, Aeromed Transport 
C119Cs, Tower Operations. 

Wisconsin: Camp Douglas, Field Training Site; Mad- 
ison, FI F89Js; Milwaukee, Air Refueling 
KC97s, Weather Flight, ACW. 

Wyoming: Cheyenne, Aeromed Transport CI 19Cs. 

Due to space limitations, the Civil Air Patrol 
article scheduled for publication in this issue of The 
AIR RESERVIST will appear instead in the February 
issue. 



10 



T 



«. hanksgiving 1962 will hold special significance 
for many of the Air Reservists ordered to active duty 
for the Cuban crisis. On the previous day, Novem- 
ber 21, they had received the welcome news that 
they were to return to inactive status, thus ending 
what was the swiftest and also briefest peacetime 
mobilization in Air Reserve history. 

[The callup of more than 14,000 Air Force Re- 
servists was ordered on the evening of October 27, 
1962. Within 12 hours 8 troop carrier wings with 
24 squadrons and supporting units and 6 aerial port 
squadrons had responded.] 

Although not as swift as the original callup, 
their demobilization was expeditiously accomplished 
with a minimum of hitches. By November 28 all ex- 
cept those who volunteered for additional active duty 
were once again in civilian clothes, resuming jobs 
they had hurriedly left a month before. Some, whose 
prompt release would have created a hardship were 
allowed to remain on duty. Certain officers applying 
for Career Reserve Status, were also retained. 

Unlike the earlier return of Reservists who had 
served during the Berlin contingency, this time there 
was little fanfare to mark the demobilization — a de- 
tail which was of little concern to the Reservists. 



RESERVISTS 



PULL THEIR 
WEIGHT 



/■ 



This was a fantastic performance 



-/ 



They knew they had the heartfelt thanks of a 
grateful public and they were confident in the knowl- 
edge of a job well done. 

In the 1961 Berlin crisis, President Kennedy 
made it clear that the Reserve callups were designed 
to "prevent rather than fight wars" by demonstrating 
U.S. determination to stand firm in an armed show- 
down. The more limited 1962 Reserve mobilization 
had an even sharper message. 

The Air Reserve Forces were the major non- 
regular participants in the show of strength that made 
the U.S. action in the Cuban crisis so decisive. Once 
again they demonstrated the degree of readiness the 
government expects of the Air Reserve Forces, leav- 
ing little doubt that they could do the job expected 
of them. 

This service rendered by the recalled Reservists 
as well as that of some non-mobilized Air Reserve 
Forces can be summed up by a statement given news- 
men during a Department of Defense briefing. 

Referring to the hurried callup a Defense spokes- 
man told newsmen, "This was a fantastic performance. 
This is the standard of performance that has been 
built into the Air Force's Reserve and Guard pro- 
gram." 

This proficiency was acknowledged by military 
and civilian leaders, including President Kennedy who 
praised the "high state of readiness" of the military 
at bases he visited on November 26. 

see next page 




-i 



302 nd 



•A 



President Kennedy pauses during November visit to Homestead AFB, to com- 
mend Col. D. Campbell, cmdr., 302nd TCWg. on unit's part in callup. 



fv* 




Released Reservists of the 440th TCWg., 
Milwaukee, Wise, are commended by 
Ma'). Gen. Chester E. McCarty, ACS/ Reserve 
Forces. The General visited every recalled wing. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiii 

sional competence of the Reserve Forces." 

General LeMay said: "I wish to express to the 
members of the Air Reserve Forces the pride which 
the Air Force feels in their outstanding response to, 
the Cuban crisis, both those called to active duty and 
those serving without mobilization orders." 

General Thomas S. Power, commander of the 
Strategic Air Command, wrote Lt. Gen. Edward J.; 
Timberlake, Continental Air Command commander, 
expressing appreciation for the "outstanding support" 
rendered SAC's B-47 contingents. This letter evi- 
denced the credibility of the entire Reserve program 
in the eyes of using commands. 

General Timberlake added, "The willing response 
and unusual ingenuity demonstrated by our Reservists 
in providing vitally needed support to active duty 
units has established beyond question the validity of 
our DARR (Recovery) mission in a dispersal role. 

Maj. Gen. Chester E. McCarty, assistant chief of 



In a letter to Lt. Gen. Walter C. Sweeney Jr., 
commander of the Tactical Air Command, the Pres- 
ident said: 

"I have a renewed appreciation of the part that 
Tactical Air Command is ready to play and the 
support that it is ready to offer the Army, both in 
combat and as an airlift to the battle zone. I would 
appreciate it if you would convey to those Reserve 
Units who gave such a ready response my special 
commendation for their fine performance. 

"Those in active service realize the extra sacri- 
fice that these men make when their civilian careers 
are interrupted to respond in a national emergency. 
Please pass to the members of your staff and all the 
units assembled in your command my thanks, my 
commendation, my warm wishes." 

Earlier, Air Force Secretary Eugene M. Zuckert 
and Chief of Staff, General Curtis E. LeMay had 
both praised the service rendered by Reserve Forces 
during their tours. (See December '62 Air Reservist.) 

Secretary Zuckert called the mobilization of the 
Reserves "a brilliant demonstration of the profes- 





Joint exercise "Sun Shade I" finds men of 101st 

Airborne Division loading their equipment 

aboard a 434th TCWg., Bakalar AFB, Ind., 

C-119, for delivery by the recalled Reservists. 

staff for Reserve Forces praised the instant response 
of Air Reserve Force members, both the Air Force 
Reservists who were recalled and the Guardsmen and 
Reservists not recalled who supported Air Force op- 
erations. 

General McCarty also praised the attitude of 
the Reservists' employers. "They (the employers) con- 
tributed much to the high morale," McCarty said. 
"They have put Americanism first." 

In another form of recognition, personnel of the 
434th Troop Carrier Wing of Bakalar AFB, Ind.,, 
received a letter of commendation from Gov. Matthew 
E. Welsh of Indiana. The letter read: 

"On behalf of the people of the State of Indianai 
I extend to you our sincere appreciation of your hon- 



The 440th TCWg., Milwaukee, Wise, "Family 
Plan" swung into action on Recall Day. 
Red Cross "Gray Ladies" performed maternal 
chores while wives/ mothers were being briefed. 



l? 



Illl 



RESERVISTS PULL THEIR WEIGHT 



able and faithful military service during the Cuban 
isis. Your prompt and willing response to the call 

your Commander in Chief during the crisis, your 
rsonal sacrifice and your selfless devotion to a 
use to prevent war, are in the best traditions of 
e U.S. Air Force Reserve. We now look to you for 
idership and example in further serving our country 

peace." 

The foregoing are only a few of the acknowledge- 
rs rendered the Reserve Forces. There were 
hers. All, however could be summed up with the 
jrds "Well Done." 



Air Force Reservists of the Continental Air Com- 
and lifted almost 4,500,000 pounds of tactical cargo 
id over 10,000 passengers since March 1962 in 
ipport of the Tactical Air Command. 

Labeled "CON TAC", this round-the-clock ef- 
rt between the two major air commands has seen 




rew members of the 433rd TCWg., Kelly AFB, 
'ex., watch delicate loading of an RS-70 engine 
uring CON TAC mission, (l-r) SSgt. Charles 
ohnson, Capt. H. Kayser, Lt. M. Faesler. 

Air Force Reserve crews on duty at all times, aug- 
lenting TAC by providing airlift on an immediate 
asis, carrying tactical cargo and passengers in support 
f the TAC mission. 

Representative of the Reserve units furnishing 
lis support is the 433rd TCWg., Kelly AFB, Texas. 
'rews assigned to the wing have flown 29 of these 
'ON TAC missions since its beginning. 

One of the largest was flown in the latter part 
f April. Six crews from the wing flew to Greater 
'eoria Airport, 111., where they loaded one 1,800 
ound generator, one 2,060 pound hydraulic mule, 
wo J-65 engines, 87 passengers and 27,547 pounds 
if assorted tactical cargo. The six crews transported 
hese passengers and cargo to England AFB, La. 



Beginning a MA TS-augmentation mission to 

Spain, this C-124 crew of Air Force Reservists 

uses an electric hoist to load the "Globemaster" 

with high priority material. 



Air Force Reservists volunteer for short tours 
of active duty to perform these missions serving for 
nine days at a time. The Reserve crew checks in at 
433rd TCWg., Operations at 8:00 a.m. Saturday morn- 
ing to report, by telephone, to the CONAC Command 
Post to receive their mission assignment and briefing, 
then they depart for their assigned destination. Upon 
completion of each phase of the mission, the aircraft 
commander contacts the CONAC Command Post for 
further instructions. 

In response to the recent critical situation in the 
Caribbean the number of Air Force Reserve crews 
participating in CON TAC was increased from 10 
to 23, and the statistics jumped proportionately. Dur- 
ing one week in October, Reservists airlifted 694,364 
pounds of tactical cargo and 332 passengers. This 
compares with the September (an average CON TAC 
month) figure of 607,202 pounds of tactical cargo 
and 782 passengers for the entire month. 

CON TAC has proven to be a valuable program 
for the Air Force and the nation. This type operation 
provides "dollar saving" training for Reservists 
through the performance of "live" missions which 
would otherwise have to be accomplished by the 
regular forces. 

The recent recall of more than 14,000 Air Force 
Reservists focused world-wide attention on the men 
and women of eight troop carrier wings, and 24 troop 
carrier squadrons. And rightly so. However, while 
these Reservists were performing a deterrent mission 
simply by being "Ready Now," their fellow Reservists 
were also serving as they roamed the world's airways 
from Indochina to Turkey to Morocco, hauling much 
needed "high value" cargo to our forces overseas. 

This immediate backup of what is normally a 
MATS mission found crewmen of the 77th and 78th 
Troop Carrier Squadrons touching down at bases in 
Japan and Spain, their Globemaster transports packed 
with jet engines, ground power units and in one in- 
stance, a complete field communications organization 
in its trailers. The return trips meant tons of mail 
taking a "Reserve Ride," Stateside. 

One flight, that of a crew attached to the 77th 
TCSq, Donaldson AFB, S. C, spent 112'/2 hours of 
flying time and a total of 16 days to deliver material 
to its destination in Thailand. Statistically they flew 
what amounted to 116,130 ton miles and 10,500 
passenger miles. 



- 




■ 


1 ■ 
■ 












1 




TO KEEP 
SPACE CLEAR 



"The Free World wants to keep 
space open for peaceful uses by all 
mankind. It sees many peaceful bene- 
fits to be derived from it. Such bene- 
fits as scientific knowledge, better 
communications, weather forecasting, 
navigation, exploration. 

"To keep space free, to prevent it 
from being dominated by any nation 
that would use it to dominate earth, 
will require a number of military space 
developments. One of these is a satel- 
lite that will give us increased warning 
of the firing of a ballistic missile. Mak- 
ing the warning effective will call for 
a system to intercept that missile and 
destroy it before it gets anywhere 
near its target. 

"Another key development will be 
an orbiting military laboratory that can 
tell us how we are going to use space 
and what we can do there. There is 
the problem of space rendezvous, 
which we must solve in order to rotate 
men and transport equipment. We will 
have to send up maintenance and re- 
pair crews and bring them back. 

"Rendezvous will also be needed to 
inspect and identify strange craft. If 
the stranger is an enemy and tries to 
destroy our vehicle, we will need fire- 
power. If the stranger tries evasive 
action, we must be capable of catching 
him. 

"Non-military systems don't have 
these basic requirements. NASA's 
lunar project is an example. Their 
men-to-the-moon will rendezvous in 
space with friendly vehicles in con- 
trolled orbits— vehicles which won't try 
to evade or destroy them. 

"There is another difference be- 
tween military and non-military proj- 
ects. The latter can put an expensive 
vehicle into space for just one trip and 
the scientific benefit makes it practical. 
But the military needs machines that 
it can use again and again. There must 
be many of them and they must have 
quick reaction and positive control. 
They must be highly maneuverable 
and large enough to hold our airmen 
and their mechanical and electronic 
systems. And they must be capable 
of landing where we want them to." 

Mark E. Bradley Jr. 

General, USAF 
Cmdr , Air Force logntici Command 



AREA DEFENSE against aircraft and ICBM's must be 
greatly improved, according to Maj. Gen. Arthur Cj 
Agan, DCS/Plans, Air Force Air Defense Command. 
He recently said: "To carry out our area defense con- 
cept and defeat the missile-carrying bomber we need 
a new weapon system — we need an improved longJ 
range manned interceptor which can reach out 1 ,000 
to 1,500 miles, operate in a semi-autonomous mode 
and be capable of deployment at speeds of Mach 3 
or better . . ," 

He also said: "The need for an effective AICBM 
was never greater. Khrushchev has recently stated that 
he has put massive efforts into the development of 
offensive ballistic missiles and that he has put an equal 
effort into devising a defense against them . . . 

"I am sure that some nation will develop an effec- 
tive area defense against ballistic missiles. It had 
better be us." 

THE ARTICLE ON COUNTERFORCE in the Saturday 
Evening Post of December 1 is worth reading. It is 
ironic, however, that the Air Force, long the primary 
exponent of the counterforce theory, appears in a 
quotation from an unidentified Air Force general to 
be against the counterforce strategy. 

Especially valuable is Secretary of Defense Mc- 
Namara's exclusive statement in the Post. In the 
interview he was asked by author Stewart Alsop: 
"As you know, some writers here and abroad have 
interpreted what you said in your Ann Arbor speech 
as implying the possibility of the United States' adopt- 
ing a first-strike strategy — a strategy of hitting first." 

McNamara replied: "What I said meant exactly 
the opposite. Because we have a sure second-strike 
capability, there is no pressure on us whatsoever to 
preempt. I assure you that we really never think in 
those terms. Under any circumstances, even if we had 
the military advantage of striking first, the price of any 
nuclear war would be terribly high. One point I was 
making in the Ann Arbor speech is that our second- 
strike capability is so sure that there would be no 
rational basis on which to launch a preemptive strike." 

GENERAL LeMAY EVALUATES Air Force role in crisis. 
The Air Force Chief of Staff said in a speech to a 
meeting of the American Ordnance Association on 
December 5 that "every task assigned Air Force units 
by the Joint Chiefs of Staff and unified commands was 
performed without a flaw. All of these jobs were done 
on time and even ahead of time." 

Among his other important observations: 

• "Cuba also demonstrated the correctness of our 
Strike Command approach. Joint forces tailored for 
lightning emergency action are going to be a require- 
ment for some time to come. 

• "Responding to the Cuban missile threat while it 
was being built was a far different thing from respond- 
ing after it had been built. Stopping aggression is fai 
easier before it takes place, or while it is taking place 
than after it has taken place. 

• "It seems to me Cuba proved that, short of guar- 
anteed disarmament, there is no substitute for superior 
strength at the strategic level. The Cuban affair did 



14 



'T/ie variety and complexity of problems which confront us call for unfailing national stamina 
..and a clear understanding by ourselves and all who deal with us that ive acknowledge the 
longer, that we are prepared to stand before it, and that ne will overcome it by means of reason 
f possible, but overcome it we will." /Honorable Eugene M. Zuckert 



ot get out of hand. There wasn't a shooting war . . . 
he ace of spades in the deterrence deck is clearly 
uperior strategic strength. 

• "Another lesson from Cuba is that military air- 
ower must be designed and operated by people who 
ave spent their lives operating airplanes and who are 
edicated professionals. 

• "I feel it's important that the American people 
nd our friends know that we have these capabilities, 
ind I think it's even more important that our po- 
mtial enemies know it." 

*AJ. RUDOLPH ANDERSON: I cannot get Maj. 
Ludolph Anderson Jr. out of my mind." So wrote 
eteran columnist Eric Sevareid in the Tuesday, No- 
ember 27, 1962 edition of The Evening Star. 

Mr. Sevareid went on to write that: "The thought 
/ill not go away that a time may come when it will 
e a tradition for Americans — and foreigners as well 
—to place wreaths at the grave of the U-2 pilot shot 
own over Cuba, our one casualty in the showdown, 
iur 'known soldier' representing hosts of others who 
lid not die, in one of history's most decisive victories. 

"It is too soon to be sure. The balance of power 
as been preserved, but the Cuban threat is not en- 
irely liquidated. Russia's long-over-due setback and 
ler alarm over the Chinese attack on India have not 
et yielded evidence of a reorientation of Soviet policy 
nd the herald of a new world equilibrium with Russia 
ssentially on the side of the West, fulfilling the 
•rophecy of General de Gaulle. Should this miracle 
ome, we would then think of Cuba as its point of 
>rigin; John F. Kennedy would surely be immortalized 
is one of our greatest Presidents and Major Anderson 
ts the martyr who died for us all. Let his present 
;rave be well marked." 

SOVIET MILITARY STRATEGY. A review in the So- 
'iet Army newspaper, Red Star, of a major new book, 
'Military Strategy," by P. Kurochkin reveals a num- 
>er of interesting opinions. Among them is this state- 
nent from the book: "Nuclear weapons already con- 
titute the foundation of firepower for all types of 
irmed forces. In order to gain an advantage over the 
:nemy in the use of weapons, one must, first and 
bremost, build up the armed forces in peacetime as 
veil as in war." 

Also this observation by the reviewer: "the authors 
X)int out that Soviet military strategy must count on 
he utilization of space to reprimand the aggressive 
ntrigues of the imperialists." 

\FLANT - CORRECTION. In the article about 
\FLANT appearing in this section of the December 
ssue, the term "TAC" should have been used instead 
}f "AFLANT" in all paragraphs after the third. 



COMBAT EFFECTIVENESS: The Air Force is provid- 
ing substantial increases in Army combat effectiveness 
said Secretary of Defense McNamara. 

Pointing to the 45 percent increase in combat-ready 
Army divisions in the past 14 months and the increase 
in the 1962 and 1963 budgets for Army procurement 
of weapons and equipment — a 65 percent increase 
over 1961 — Secretary McNamara added: "Equally 
important for the Army is the fact that 1963 procure- 
ment funds for airlift aircraft are double the amount 
for 1961 and that twice as many tactical fighters are 
being procured for the Air Force in fiscal year 1963 
as in fiscal year 1961. "Together with these sub- 
stantial increases in Army combat effectiveness, a 
greatly intensified effort is being made to assist our 
friends and Allies in meeting the threat of Com- 
munist-supported insurgent movements." 

THE. U. S. STRIKE COMMAND is developing new 
air/ground support procedures according to its Com- 
mander in Chief, Gen. Paul D. Adams. 

STRICOM is a unified command whose air com- 
ponent is comprised of combat ready forces of the 
Air Force Tactical Air Command teamed with all 
combat ready forces of the Army's Continental Army 
Command. 

The Army general says that: "In the past there 
have been many heated discussions of this subject, 
and in my judgment neither the Army nor the Air 
Force has ever been completely satisfied with the 
present air/ground support system. Without any fuss 
or furor, or blood and guts on the floor, we now have 
a recommended air ground support system concurred 
in completely by CINCAFSTRIKE and CINCAR- 
STRIKE. We field-tested this system during Exercise 
THREE PAIRS and plan to continue the practical 
tests until late spring of Fiscal Year 63." 



Air Force 

1 
01 View 




:^#£ 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



USAI- KecurririK Publication '■','> 1 
No. aO-H-l-63-3»0,843 



reserve 
cemere 

A Top policy planners for Reserve Forces assigned for 
training and inspection to the Air Force Communications 
Service recently concluded a three-day conference at 
Scott AFB, III. They were headed by Brig. Gen. 
Peter C. Sandretto, International Telephone and Tele- 
graph Corporation executive and mobilization day as- 
sistant to the AFCS commander. General Sandretto (I) 
is shown discussing conference with Brig. Gen. Ross C. 
Garlich, Missouri's assistant adjutant general for air; 
committee vice-chairman Ma). Gen. Chester E. McCarty, 
assistant chief of staff for Reserve Forces, and AFSC 
commander Ma]. Gen. Kenneth P. Bergquist. Q A Crew 
Chief of the Month program was recently initiated by 
the flight line branch of the 124th CAMRON, Idaho 
Air National Guard. Top Crew Chief of the Month is 



presented an engraved plaque by the CAMRON com- 
mander. Recent recipients of the award are (l-r) SSgts. 
James Taylor and William Lee; TSgts. John Fitzsim- 
mons and Julian Stewart; SSgt. Dave Nicholas and I 
CMSgt. Percy Herrera. Not present for the picture was 
TSgt. Elvin Scrivner. Q October and November were 
busy months for administrative personnel of recalled Re- 
serve units. The 434th TCWg., Bakalar AFB, Colum- 
bus, Ind., like other wings, worked overtime processing 
personnel for active duty and then met demobilization 
deadlines in record time. Q SSgt. LeRoy W. Slaughter 
of the 9517th AFRRSq., South Bend, Ind., known local- 
ly for his many humanitarian acts, helps liven last year's 
Halloween party given youngsters of the Logan School 
and Center for the Retarded of South County, Ind. by 
his squadron. The Sergeant, who initiated this and other 
parties is shown holding "Thomas" while "Daniel" and 
"Steven" watch. 



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cial Magazine Of The Air Reserve Forces 



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FEBRUARY 1963 



the a i& 




ras a great year for the Air Reserve Farces 



the aln reservist 



Vol. XV-No. 2 



Feb. 1963 



AIR FORCE RESERVE 
CIVIL AIR PATROL AIR NATIONAL GUARD 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 



EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 



ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 



The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of HQ USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, D.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq. USAF. 







ftOl'AKT m> 



the elr reservist 




l~ .»- Mr »..«,. /.rr,. 



General LeMay 

Lauds Air 

Reserve Forces 




GENERAL CURTIS LeMAY lauded the effectiveness of the Ain 
Reserve Forces at his first meeting with the Air Reserve Forces 
Policy Committee last month in the Pentagon. The Air Force 
Chief of Staff particularly cited the overnight mobilization of 1 
14,000 Reservists in the Cuban crisis and told the Policy Com- 
mittee that he appreciated its help and guidance in their efforts 
to produce more and better air power with maximum utilization 
of all resources. 

"I think we are on the right track, and moving very rapidly," 
he commented. "That's an accomplishment we can be proud of 
during the last couple of years. We are going to make more 
improvements in the future." 

General LeMay pointed out that military forces in this day. 
and age must be able to pull their weight right now, and not 
at some time in the future. He praised the present Air Reserve 
Forces system in which gaining commands supervise the training 
and inspect the organizations which they will control when they 
are called to active duty, stating: 

"When you have someone training units he knows he is 
going to take into combat, he gets deeply interested. The system 
we have now will produce the best combat units we can get 
with the resources available." 

The General also praised the activities of Reserve Forces 
units not specifically mobilized during the Cuban crisis, indicating 
the outstanding work of recovery squadrons. 

"This is my idea of a real reserve outfit. They turned to and 
helped without being called to active duty, at a sacrifice to 
many of the individuals concerned," he said. 



This month's cover symbolizes "globility" and 'round-the-cloc 
readiness of the Air Reserve Forces. It shows a KC-97 of tl 
Illinois ANG performing its added refueling mission in '62, an! 
a C-119 of the Air Force Reserve being readied for a night mi 
sion during Operation "Boxcar Pass." 







was a great year 



1962, the "Deterrent worth" of America's Reserve Forces was proved. The response to the 
rlin and Cuban crises was an unqualified success and the professional performance of numer- 
s other missions by Reservists earned them the admiration of their active duty counterparts. 



or the Air 

aiional Guard 



1962 DREW to a close, the Air National Guard looked 
:k on a year of great accomplishment and many firsts, 
ne of these highlights are contained in their "Fiscal 
ar 1962 Annual Report of the Chief, National Guard 
reau," released on December 31. 

Topping the list of achievements for the fiscal year 
re the Berlin mobilization and "Operation Stairstep," 

whereby over 200 Air 
Guard jets crossed the 
Atlantic in one of the 
most remarkable dem- 
onstrations of readi- 
ness in history. 
"Stairstep" flights of 
October - November 
1961 represented the 
gest deployment of jet fighters in the history of the Air 
rce. With little experience in overwater flying, these men 
de the demanding flights without a loss or accident, 
eir return to the U. S. in 1962 was also without incident. 
The feat was not accomplished solely by Air Guards- 
n. The effort represented the consolidated accomplish- 
es of a whole host of supporting elements — Air Force, 
vy and Coast Guard, plus some Air Reservists and Air 
lardsmen who had not been mobilized. 

Praise came from all over. Secretary of the Air Force 
gene M. Zuckert sent word: 

". . . The manner in which the deployment was con- 
cted so soon after recall could only be the result of 
stained superior performance. It is my desire that every 
in in your organization knows of the pride the whole 
r Force feels in this accomplishment, which reflects the 
;h standard set and maintained in Air National Guard 
lining." 

In early November 1961, three F-104 units were 
lied. Their Starfighters were loaded in giant Military Air 
ansport Service C-124 Globemasters, flown across the 
lantic and in less than three weeks after mobilization 
ise units were flying alert missions at their overseas bases. 
Air Guard aircraft control and warning units sat right 
the Iron Curtain and Air Guard weathermen proved 
;mselves in spite of the fact that they were out of their 
tural habitat. Mobilized ANG transport units carried 
t significant duties, flying missions for the Air Force 
over the world. 
On and off the job these Guardsmen performed ex- 
see ANG page 8 



For the Air 

Force Reserve 



IN RETROSPECT, the year 1962 was one of great con- 
sequence for Air Force Reservists throughout America. 
For them it was a demanding, exciting, and profitable year, 
and above all a year they could look back on with well- 
earned pride. 

A world full of trouble spots and tense international 
situations held firm reins on the lives of Air Force Re- 
servists, dictating the 
return of two C-124 
troop carrier wings 
and five troop car- 
rier squadrons to inac- 
tive status in August. 
These units had been 
recalled in October 
1961 as a result of 

the precarious Berlin situation. And, hardly had they been 
released from active status when the Cuban crisis erupted, 
forcing President Kennedy to again call upon the Air Force 
Reserve. It meant activating some 14,000 officers and 
airmen from 8 troop carrier wings, 24 troop carrier squad- 
rons, and 6 aerial port squadrons on October 28th. 

The immediacy of the Reservists' response in this 
crucial situation lent positive credence to a new concept 
of Reserve utilization — Deterrence through Recall. 

Although the Berlin and Cuban crises accounted for 
the major portion of Air Force Reserve publicity during 
1962, the year also was filled with activity in all facets of 
Reserve affairs. 

Following is a chronological review of some of the 
more notable Air Force Reserve activities during 1962: 

In January, Continental Air Command's 13 troop 
carrier wings (equipped with C-119 and C-123 aircraft) 
began an extensive support effort in connection with the 
airborne training of U. S. Continental Army Command 
troops. These flying units provided ten aircraft and crews 
each weekday, operating generally out of Pope AFB, N.C., 
Campbell Army Air Field, Ky., and Ft. Benning, Ga., 
airdropping troops and equipment on a regular basis 
throughout the year. 

Air Force Reservists affiliated with the DARR pro- 
gram (Dispersal, Aircraft Recovery and Reconstitution) 
started early in the year to conduct the training exercises 
required to reach and maintain the state of preparedness 
to provide the active forces with approximately 200 
skilled, ready units to operate in an emergency at civilian 

see next page 



C 

was a great year for the air force reserve 



and inactive military airfields. Basically, the Recovery mis- 
sion is designed to supply an important factor in our na- 
tion's ability to survive any surprise nuclear attack by 
making available trained Reservists to contribute to Air 
Force's capability to recover, repair and refuel its combat 
aircraft for further action against the aggressor. Through- 
out 1962 more than 200 exercises of this type were con- 
ducted by Air Force Reservists. 

During the Cuban emergency, Recovery Reservists 
demonstrated the value of these exercises by voluntarily 
performing services in connection with the dispersal of the 
Air Force's combat aircraft. The professional manner in 
which these Recoverymen performed has earned for them 
the praise of the President and many other civilian and 
military leaders. 

In February, nearly 100 CONAC Air Force Reserve 
troop carrier aircraft took part in an Air Force-Army 
joint exercise (Banyan Tree III) in the Republic of Pan- 
ama, augmenting forces of the Tactical Air Command. The 
Reservists airdropped and airlanded over 300 tons of heavy 
equipment in their C-119's and C-123's, while other Re- 
servists provided logistic airlift support, flying in needed 
supplies and equipment. 

During March, Reservists from the 434th Troop Car- 
rier Wing, Bakalar AFB, Ind. and the 96th Troop Carrier 
Squadron, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., tallied more than 
16,000 accident-free hours to win the USAF Flying Safety 
awards for 1961. The 434th flew more than 11,000 miles 
in ferrying aircraft from Hawaii and France including 31 
over-water training flights. Some 5,000 accident-free hours 
were flown by the 96th in airlifting troops, supplies and 
equipment into prepared and unprepared landing areas by 
parachute or air landings. 



Navigators took the spotlight during May when '. 
selected Reserve navigators competed for national hone 
in CONAC's Sixth Annual Reserve Navigation compe 
tion at Ellington AFB, Tex. The top team proved 
be the 8511th Navigator Training Squadron from Horr 
stead AFB, Fla. Maj. Thomas W. Miller of the 8498' 
Navigator Training Squadron at Andrews AFB, Md., ca' 
tured individual honors in the exacting meet. 

In June, CONAC announced that the 619th US/' 
Reserve Hospital at Boston, Mass. would be a test unit;] 
a proposed plan that may affect similar hospitals througj 
out the nation. The test, still in progress, embodies part] 
dispersal of the Boston unit into detachments in nearl 
communities. 

July was the month in which Lt. Gen. Edward 
Timberlake took over as commander of Continental /] 
Command from Lt. Gen. Gordon A. Blake. General Til] 
berlake came to CONAC's Robins AFB, Ga., headquarte] 
after a tour of duty as deputy chief of staff for Personnj 
Hq. USAF, Washington, D. C. 

Meanwhile, two Air Force Reserve wings tied i 
first place honors in CONAC's 1962 Outstanding Reser 
Wing Competition. Sharing honors were the 433rd, Ke 
AFB, Tex. and the 349th, Hamilton AFB, Calif. T 
wings were judged on the basis of personnel data, opt 
ational data, training data, and the data in operatior 
readiness reports, inspection reports, and the CON/ 
rating system. 

Also during July the 446th Reserve Troop Can- 
Wing at Ellington AFB, Tex., conducted a series of si 
cessful air drops to test prototype Mercury space capsuli 
Reservists dropped a number of 2,100-pound boilerph 
versions of the Mercury capsule from altitudes of 1,5' 



'Recovery" Reservists augmented SAC and ADC in aircraft dispersal during last year's Cuban crisis. 






FC-844 U.S.MH t UV 




d 2,500 feet, working under the supervision of techni- 
ins from the National Aeronautics and Space Adminis- 
ition's Manned Spacecraft Center at Houston. 

Troop carrier units also took the spotlight in August 
len more than 7,000 Air Force Reservists participated 
a joint exercise called "Swift Strike II" in North and 
kith Carolina. More than 200 CON AC C-119 "Flying 
jxcars" participated in the massive exercise, providing 
rlift support for the U. S. Strike Command — a mobile, 
xible, and highly trained force comprised of units from 
e Continental Army Command and the Tactical Air Com- 
and. They were joined by more Reservists from five 
DNAC Reserve aerial port units. 

Earlier, the aerial port program had been revised 
nen CONAC added 22 new detachments to the then exist- 
g six squadrons and six detachments. This increased 
>mbat readiness by putting loadmaster personnel at the 
cations of Reserve troop carrier squadrons they support. 

Two Reserve C-124 wings called to active duty for 
e Berlin crisis returned to inactive status in August after 
ightly less than a year with the active establishment. 

In September Air Force Reserve flying units airlifted 
)0 tons of equipment to Mississippi when it appeared that 
tizens in Natchez might have to be evacuated during an 
tempt to lift tanks of chlorine chemical which had been 
ink in the Mississippi river. Fortunately, the tanks were 
ised and transferred without mishap, but the Reservists 
id done their share to cover any eventuality. 

It also was during September that the 452nd Troop 
arrier Wing from March AFB, Calif., took top honors in 
e 1962 CONAC Annual Reserve Troop Carrier Wing 
>mpetition at Ellington AFB, Tex. Top crews from the 
I competing wings then went on to Las Vegas, Nev., to 
>mpete for an Air Force Association trophy, with the 
10th Troop Carrier Wing from General Mitchell Field, 
'isc, named winner of the AFA award. 

With October came the recall of C-119 and C-123 
nits to active duty as a result of the disclosure that Soviet 
Tensive weapons were being established in Cuba. The 
istant response of the 14,000 Air Force Reservists is 
edited with being a major factor in alleviating the situa- 
on and they returned to Reserve status in a month. 

During the year CONAC Reserve troop carrier wings 
so airlifted some 5,000,000 pounds of cargo and 10,000 
assengers in a round-the-clock effort with Tactical Air 
ommand. This massive support program called CON 
AC began in March. Reservists provided ten crews and 
ircraft at all times to assist TAC in lifting cargoes and 
assengers on missions of immediate tactical importance. 

The Cuban crisis formed the basis for a mammoth 
Lrlift of men, supplies and equipment by Air Force Re- 
:rve's troop carrier units. When the tensions abated the 
.ir Force Reserve was again called upon — this time to 
averse its logistical support of the active forces. 

see AFRes next page 




Skills were sharpened as Reservists vied for honors at last 
year's Navigation Competition. Meets such as these helped 
produce the "professionalism" used during the crises of '62. 



Reservists of the 403 rd TCWg., Self ridge AFB, Michigan 
worked late into the night to demobilize its Cuba-recalled 
personnel, proving its administrative "in-house" ability. 



J 




fr*rt* 




Base Support 



The last day of 1962 brought to an end the Air Force 
Reserve's two year test of its Base Support program. 

After over two years of experience with the six units, 
the Air Force decided the test revealed no significant im- 
provements over the more flexible earlier training program. 

Another consideration in the decision was the fact 
that funds made available for the Reserve Recovery pro- 
gram (of which the Base Support Groups were a part) are 
insufficient for Fiscal Year 1963 to provide drill pay spaces 
for all participating Reservists. A reduction in the overall 
strength of the recovery program was therefore required 
prior to December 31, 1962. 

The discontinuance of the units had little effect upon 
the Reservists assigned as each one of the 1,100 men in- 
volved was offered a Part I position with MoARS, the 
Mobilization Assignment Reserve Section. This, in effect, 
is a transfer from Base Support status to one in Air Force 
Reserve's Individual Training program at the same base 
to which they were previously attached. 



■ AFRei from page 5 

Volunteer aircrews from all of Continent Air Com- 
mand's 15 troop carrier wings airlifted from Florida 
1,448 servicemen and 1,601,000 pounds of equipment. 

The Reserve aircrews flew 4,319 hours in twin-engine 
C-119 "Flying Boxcar" and C-123 "Provider" aircraft, and 
in four-engine C-124 "Globemaster" transports, to rede- 
ploy equipment and personnel rushed to Florida air bases. 

Many of the Reservists called to active duty during 
the crisis volunteered to remain on active duty for an addi- 
tional 15 days to assist in redeploying regular Air Force 
personnel and their equipment to their home bases. 

Reserve aircrews flew such missions from Florida to 
more than a dozen air bases, some as far away as Cali- 
fornia. They hauled 11,000 pound tractors, 7,000 pound 
jet engines, 2 tons of documents, 3,000 pound trailers, 
a 7,000 pound radio van truck, GI duffle bags — even a 
7x7'x6' communications shack. In addition to these and 
other items, Reserve fliers airlifted 1,448 military per- 
sonnel back to their home bases. 

Year's end saw Reserve activities continuing at the 
same brisk pace that was set during the previous 12 months. 
The "Ready Now" accomplishments of 1962 should serve 
as inspiration for every officer and airman affiliated with 
the Air Force Reserve program. 



s ( 

i 

at. 



Under the Individual Training Program, Reservists | 
the Base Support Groups will continue to be directly 
sponsive to their bases of assignment. The Air Force 
also retain all the advantages, for each Reservist previoi 
assigned to the Support Groups will continue to be 
to train with active units in the same grade and pay stai 
as during the test period. 

The six Air Force Reserve Base Support Groups wa 
originally organized in the fall of 1960, and were design 
to augment the capabilities of active bases in recoveril 
from the effects of enemy attack. It was contemplated tH 
the manning of these units would be comprised primarj 
of the Reservists then assigned to individual mobilizati 
positions at the bases. 

The six Base Support Groups deactivated as of De 
31, were the 8318th, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio; 8395J 
Richards-Gebaur AFB, Mo.; 8421st, Travis AFB, Cal| 
8344th, Randolph AFB,Tex.; 8320th, Sewart AFB.Teni 
and the 8334th, Westover AFB, Mass. 




The Reserve airlift of supplies to a Catholic Mission 
Guatemala is typical of many such "mercy" flights, (i 
Father McClear, Sisters Joselita Teresa and Martin Tere 



JOB MART 



Listed below are M-Day vacancies reported by 
units indicated. These openings offer qualified Reservists 
up to 48 paid drills annually and adjustable training 
periods as well as other benefits. Those with asterisks are 
on flying status and offer base pay plus incentive pay — 
including flying training periods. Applicants should write 
directly to the following addresses giving their full name, 
address, grade and AFSC: 

Hq 166th ATGp. (H), Delaware Air National 
Guard, Bldg. 1504, Greater Wilmington Airport, New 
Castle, Del: The 166th, flying C-97s, has vacancies for 
•pilots and 'navigators in grades up to lieutenant colonel; 



* flight engineers; flight engineer trainees (qualified ail 
craft mechanics); aircraft maintenance men in all specia 
ties; *flight nurses; nurses-general; and *aeromedic« 
specialists. 

DCS/Personnel, Hq 2nd Air Force Reserve Regiot 
Andrews AFB, Wash. 25, D. C: 22 Reserve vacancie 
to be filled by former military personnel with prior servic 
experience in intelligence, censorship, administration, aj 
operations, supply, accounting and finance, personnel, an 
medical administration. Twenty enlisted personnel pos 
tions for grades from airman first class to senior maste 
sergeant are available. Two officer positions; lieutenai 
colonel, (intelligence,) and captain, (administration) ah 
are open. 



Reservists, Maj. Lyndall Griggs (I) and Capt. 

Bob Williams, receive expert advice during 

their "Programmed Learning" research 

from Dr. Virginia Zachert, programming consultant. 




Programmed Learning* 



AMERICA'S PRINCIPLES of morality demand that "De- 
terrence" represent the end product of our national military 
strategy, and that the armed forces' contribution to that 
strategy take the form of "potential" superior to that of 
any aggressor. Air Force, to stay abreast of technological 
advancements, has turned to a deep study of the principles 
of education and training. Air Force Reserve has been 
delegated the task of assisting in this test program, with 
emphasis on nuclear disaster control and its application 
to the Reserve's Recovery Program. 

The Air Force calls it "Programmed Learning," a 
method — both old and new — of conveying knowledge. It 
is a system that seeks to restore the tutor-pupil relationship, 
and permits each student to move forward in accordance 
with his aptitude. 

Programmed Learning employs man's natural desire 
to avoid making mistakes, and it may be said that the 
student who makes many errors is the student who labels 
that course of study "difficult." Normally the reverse is 
true. The fewer errors the less "difficulty." 

Other principles are used in Programmed Learning, 
such as the Principle of Participation, and the Principle of 
Immediate Knowledge of Results. Learning is more com- 
plete when the student remains mentally active throughout 
the teaching session, and one method is to demand fre- 
quent responses from the student. Under Programmed 
Learning the student receives new material in a series of 
short units, each of which contains a question which he 
must answer before moving on to the next unit. There are 
a variety of methods used in transferring the subject mat- 
ter, ranging from a series of cards to complicated elec- 
tronic devices. The process also allows the student to know 
just how he is doing, since he is informed of his results 
immediately after each short unit. 

In October 1961 the Air Force began the transition 
from pure research to the operational phase. The results 
of this operational phase will be evaluated this coming 
summer and if they prove satisfactory an expansion of the 
first phase will be initiated. 

Air Force Reserve's Citizen/ Airman, or "Two Hat" 
concept lent itself perfectly to the project, for throughout 
the nation there were many Reservists who were also well 
qualified educators. Eighteen of these individuals were 
selected to pioneer the Programmed Learning project within 
the Continental Air Command. 

The officers selected were: Lt. Col. Andrew R. Mc- 
Kelvie, Washington, D.C.; Lt. Col. Ray F. Wahl, North- 



ampton, Pa.; Maj. Gerald H. Farrell, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Maj. John A. Valentine, Princeton, N.J.; Maj. Robert H. 
Curran, Hyde Park, Mass.; Capt. Thomas P. Cheesman, 
Bethlehem, Pa.; Maj. Alfred S. Drew, W. Lafayette, Ind.; 
Col. Paul Gonzales, New Orleans, La.; and Maj. Lyndall 
H. Griggs, Port Neches, Tex. Others were Maj. Carl E. 
Reed, Houston, Tex.; Capt. Bob M. Williams, Norman, 
Okla.; Maj. Otis E. Harvley, Dallas, Tex.; Capt. Wallace 
E. Hoffman, Yazoo City, Miss.; Maj. Arden J. Johnson, 
Lafayette, Ind.; Maj. William G. Norris, San Gabriel, 
Calif.; Maj. Roy A. Whistle, San Jose, Calif.; Capt. Edward 
W. Solomon, Napa, Calif.; and 1st Lt. William G. Woods, 
Richland, Wash. 

These Reservists familiarized themselves with the sub- 
ject matter — disaster control — and then attended the two- 
week Reserve Officer's Disaster Control course at Lowry 
AFB, Colo. In July of 1962 they were divided into three 
teams and called to active duty for 30 days. Each team of 
six officers went to a different Air Force base where they 
programmed materials on specific subjects such as fallout, 
instruments for measuring radioactivity and their use, pro- 
tective measures, etc. During this period they received 
professional guidance from Dr. Virginia Zachert, a lead- 
ing consultant in programming. 

When the period ended, three of the eighteen pro- 
grammers were placed on active duty at Lowry AFB for 
one week to edit and consolidate the materials developed 
by the three teams. The resulting product is a six-volume 
programmed course in Disaster Control (Nuclear). 

A pre-course survey of 15,000 Air Force Reservists 
in DARR units is now being conducted to determine the 
extent of their knowledge in Disaster Control. The next 
step is the selection by CONAC's 16 Reserve Sectors of 
approximately 5,000 Reservists to serve as a control group. 
The six-volume course will then be administered to this 
group and a test will be given at the completion of each 
volume. A comparison with the pre-course survey will re- 
veal how much learning has resulted. The first phase is 
expected to be completed in the early spring of 1963. It 
is then anticipated that all other DARR Reservists not in 
the test group will complete these materials. However, no 
consolidated data will be gathered on these personnel. 

Air Force Reserve's active participation in this USAF- 
sponsored program is firm proof that the "in house" po- 
tential of Reservists is vast and oftentimes surprising. In 
short, the Air Force Reserve is always "Ready Now" to 
tackle any worthwhile problem. 




was a great year for the air national guard, 



£* 




Route lines show "Globility" of the ANG during 1962. 



A 

During callup, Europe- 



;d Guardsmen practice scramble. 



M^v ^*"' 4MMK 



V 54, 





77?e Berlin recall complete, Air National G 
Wing, Ft. Wayne, Ind., pass in review before 



m ANG from page 3 

cellently. Overseas, they impressed the people in com- 
munities where they were stationed. One Guardsman taught 
youngsters in Germany to swim and dive. A puppeteer 
from New Jersey entertained French children. A Guards- 
man-musician wrote church music that may be adopted by 
the Vatican and Guardsmen-teachers established English 
language courses in many areas. Together, they were among 
the best ambassadors. 

On the job they did as well. The 151st Fighter Inter- 
ceptor Squadron from Tennessee established an all-time 
flying record for the I - 1 04. MATS units far exceeded the 
flying expected of them, some of them almost doubling 
their requirements. 

Upon release from active duty it was expected, as had 
happened in the past, that many Air Guardsmen would 



leave their units as soon as they reached home. Even the 
most dedicated Guard officials were amazed at the result 
of a survey completed soon after demobilization which 
showed that the ANG was to retain over 88 percent of the 
manpower it had at the time of the recall. 

The period since the demobilization of those Air 
Guardsmen called to active duty has been one of evalua- 
tion and change as well as satisfaction. The mobilization 
was a success but it also revealed the need for change in 
several areas. 

New "mobilization type" unit manning documents had 
to be developed to bring the ANG unit configuration closer 
to the needs of the Air Force while still fulfilling the unique 
local supporting requirements of the Air Guard in the 
States. More facilities were needed to billet and mess 




f the 122nd Tactical Fighter 
■s prior to return to civilian life. 



lits when they were called to active duty but remained at 
ieir home bases. Correction of these problems were well 
ider way by the end of the year. 

To speed up the reporting and accounting procedures, 
;w punch card data processing equipment was installed at 
% ANG bases, with plans for the rest of the ANG to 
3 over to the same system. Many more time-saving auto- 
lation improvements are planned in the near future. 

A new law went into effect during the fiscal year 
hereby non-prior service enlistees are now required to 
ilist for a period of six years instead of three as was 
squired in the past. 

ANG's aeromedical mission received a significant test 
ist October during "Operation Chlorine" when the 183rd 
leromedical Evacuation Squadron from Jackson, Miss., 



was used to evacuate invalids from the Natchez, Miss., 
area while four huge tanks of deadly chlorine gas were 
raised from the mud at the bottom of the Mississippi River. 
They also stood by with other Army and ANG units to 
evacuate the whole area if any of the tanks had broken. 

During last year's Cuban crisis Air Guardsmen all 
over the U. S. pitched in to help the Air Force by receiving 
large numbers of Strategic Air Command and Air Defense 
Command aircraft at ANG bases, by lending equipment 
and volunteering to work for the Air Force and by flying 
MATS missions thereby releasing active Air Force air 
transports for other priority missions. 

The ANG continued its drive to train as many units 
as possible with "actual missions." ANG transport units 
participated in the year-round field training program where- 
by individual members of a unit can spread their 15-day 
active duty tour over several periods during the year to fly 
regular missions for MATS. 

ADC Guard units now train under this plan and 
communications units made great strides in this area dur- 
ing the year. Fifteen GEE1A squadrons trained by actually 
installing USAF equipment on USAF-programmed proj- 
ects. This gave the units training at Cape Canaveral, Van- 
denberg and many other important locations, including 
support of Minuteman and Atlas sites as well as projects 
like the second Mercury shot. Maintenance squadrons were 
work-loaded by Air Force Logistics Command with rep- 
arable items of communications equipment, training and 
actual depot level maintenance. 

Two ANG mobile communications squadrons with 
their nine flights, provided part of the actual air traffic 
control and communications support of ANG permanent 
field training site operations during training. The 267th 
Communications Squadron of Wellesley, Mass., near Hans- 
com Field, furnished a complete shift of workers two eve- 
nings a week for the communications center of the Air 
Force Track Research and Development Facility. 

In May 1962 the first C-121C aircraft for ANG's 
aeromedical mission were assigned to the Guard. Dur- 
ing the year the other new mission in the ever-widening 
role of the Air Guard, air refueling, received a boost in the 
form of several more KC-97 tanker aircraft. 

Brig. Gen. I. G. Brown moved from his position as 
executive secretary of the Air Reserve Forces Policy Com- 
mittee to become assistant chief, National Guard Bureau 
for the ANG. The former Assistant Chief for Air, Maj. 
Gen. Winston P. Wilson began devoting full time to his 
position as deputy chief of NGB. 

General Brown's promotion from colonel became 
effective in August 1962. He brought to the Bureau a 
fund of experience in both the Guard and Air Force. 

The Air Guard got back into the school business in 
October when it opened its own small but important 
training center for radar interceptor officers at Portland, 
Ore., home of the 142nd Fighter Group. The school 
trains the all-important second man in the F89J fighter- 
interceptor for the nine ANG squadrons which fly this jet 
in their air defense role. 

These are just the highlights of a year that put the 
Air Guard in a stronger, more ready position than it has 
ever been. It is understandable that General Wilson began 
his speech at the National Guard Association Conference 
last October with the statement: "I am as proud to be a 
National Guardsman at this moment as I have ever been." 



New Air Guard Aircraft Insignia 




lllllll till till 



A 



ll Air National Guard aircraft will soon carry 
standard U. S. Air Force markings. 

Under regulations now in the process of dis- 
tribution, ANG aircraft no longer will bear the familiar 
"Air Guard" designation, which has long identified 
the aircraft with the state in which it was based. 

In the past, the aircraft were identified by state 
in large lettering on the nose section of the fuselage, 
such as "Va. Air Guard." In the future, however, 
that designation will give way to "U.S. Air Force." 
The standard "USAF" will be the identification on 
the wings. 

The Air Guard identification will be retained 
on the aircraft by means 01 a new Air National 
Guard insignia — 20 inches in diameter for fighter 
aircraft and 30 inches for larger aircraft. The insignia, 
designed by Lt. Col. Joseph D. Day, chief of the 
Guard Bureau's Maintenance-Engineering Branch, is 
a black and white design, showing a Minuteman 
with two aircraft silhouettes in the background. 



"Air National Guard" is printed on the insignia. 

The insignia will be placed over the tail numbers 
on the aircrafts' vertical stabilizer. The name of the 
state where the unit is located will be painted over 
the top of the insignia thereby giving the plane its 
state identification. 

The new markings are a result of experiences of 
units called to active duty in the Berlin crisis. At 
that time, the "Air Guard" markings had to be re- 
moved and replaced with "U.S. Air Force." The 
"Air Guard" identification was placed on the aircraft 
upon the units return to state status. 

Officials believed too many man hours were re- 
quired in changing the markings. In addition, there 
was a belief that Air Guard aircraft moving to or 
through overseas locations should be identified as Air 
Force, rather than Air Guard, aircraft. 

If units are activated in the future, they still will 
have to remove the Air Guard insignia and state iden- 
tification from the vertical stabilizer. 



BRIG. GEN. WILLARD W. MILLIKAN, ANG, triple air ace and former 
transcontinental air speed record holder, has been elected president 
of the American Fighter Aces Association, a national organization 
made up of active and retired fighter aces of the U. S. The General 
was also recently named chairman of the Air Force Association's Air 
National Guard Council for 1963. He will serve as adviser to its pres- 
ident on Air Guard matters. General Millikan, who is associated with 
the Northrop Corp., completed a year of active duty last year as 
commander of the 113th TFWg., Andrews AFB, Md. COL. CLINTON 
U. TRUE, USAF, former chief of staff, 5th Air Force Region, has become 
its commander, succeeding Brig. Gen. Charles M. Young, who retired 
last December. Graduated from West Point, Class '36, where he was 
twice picked as Ail-American (lacrosse) and played football, Colonel 
True was a bomber pilot during WWII. He holds a Command Pilot 
rating and has more than 5,000 hours of flying time. MSGT. CARL W. 
HARTMAN, a Florida Reservist, recently was awarded the Air Force 
Commendation Medal for distinguished service as NCOIC of the 
435th Tactical Hospital's Dental Clinic at Homestead AFB, Fla., during 
the October 1961— August 1962 callup of Reserves for the Berlin 
crisis. LT. COL. GENEVA S. DIMITROFF, a nurse attached to the 9834th 
Air Force Reserve Squadron at Walker AFB, N.M., is a devoted Re- 
servist. A resident of Clayton, N.M., she makes the 180-mile round 
trip to attend monthly Reserve meetings at Walker. She spends ap- 
proximately six hours on the road to accomplish a two hour meeting 
— and during inclement weather as much as nine hours. The Colonel 
travels an average of 4,000 miles a year to attend meetings. 









+M 


dun 


BHHF3 



Brig. Gen. Millikan 




Col. True 



Lt Col. Dimitroff 




MSgt. Hartman 



10 



BRIEFLY 



he 125th Air Transport Squadron, Tulsa, Okla., has 
tellenged a statement in our December issue concern- 
lg the Dover to Viet-Nam mission of the 109th ATSq., 
chenectady, N. Y. The article stated that the 109th 
rew may have achieved two records for C-97s recalled 
uring the Berlin crisis — distance flown and cargo car- 
ed. The 125th, also recalled during that period, claims 
longer mission. Their trip departed Tulsa, to fly the 
ormal MATS route from Travis AFB, Calif., to Tachi- 
awa AB, Japan and return. However, it turned out that 
1ATS had other plans. When they returned 23 days later 
ley found that they had logged 123 flying hours, tra- 
iled a distance of 26,175 miles, carried cargo 135,000 
>n miles and flown 29,535 passenger miles. 

\ reorganization of Air Force Reserve troop carrier wings 
egan last month. The new plan is designed to give 
reater flexibility and combat-readiness to the Reserve 
rganizations. Seven wings not recalled to active duty in 
le Cuban crisis were the first to change. The other eight 
ings will go under the new plan on February 1 1 . Each 
ill have self-supporting Air Force Reserve groups in 
s structure, with the wing headquarters acting primarily 
5 a plans and policy agency and retaining overall com- 
land. The concept of each squadron having its own 
jpport activities enables greater flexibility of recall. 

. Board will convene at ARRC February. 18 to consider 
pproximately 300 Reserve 2nd lieutenants for promotion 
) 1st lieutenant. To be eligible for consideration, officers 
lust hold a promotion service date on or before Decem- 
er 31, 1960, and be in an active status. A similar Board 
ill convene at the Center March 11-15 to consider ap- 
roximately 4,000 eligible majors not on active duty, for 
romotion to lieutenant colonel. Eligible officers must 
ave a PSD on or before June 30, 1957 and TYSD on 
r before June 30, 1943. 

another Board will convene on March 25 at Hq. USAF 

l Washington to consider all eligible active duty officers 
)r promotion to the permanent grade of lieutenant col- 
nel. This will include warrant officers holding Reserve 
Dmmissions and all Air National Guard officers (Ex- 
:nded Active Duty and non-EAD). A separate selection 
oard will meet the same date to consider eligible nurses, 
ledical specialists and female officers. Both active and 
lactive duty officers will be considered. All officers in 
lis category with a PSD of March 25, 1959 or earlier, 
nd a TYSD of June 30, 1946 or earlier, are eligible. 

v reminder that Income Tax returns will be due shortly 
omes from the Air Reserve Records Center which has 
nnounced that TD Forms W-2 for personnel assigned 
d Continental Air Command units will be issued by 
kRRC on or about January 31. These will cover the 
eriod July 1 to December 31, 1962. Forms W-2 for the 
rior period (January thru June) will be issued by Re- 
srve units under former tax reporting procedures. Re- 
;rvists are asked not to contact the Center concerning 
V-2 Forms until after February 1 , and queries should be 
irected to the member's unit for clarification prior to 
ny correspondence with ARRC. 



A 28-minute motion picture in color, depicting the role 
played by the Air Reserve Forces in two emergency 
mobilizations — Berlin and Cuba — is now in its final pro- 
duction phase. The picture was filmed at various locations 
throughout the U. S. and overseas. It will be available 
throughout the Air Force, including the Air National 
Guard and Air Force Reserve. 

Exercise "Timber Line," a joint Army-Air Force maneu- 
ver, will lead off scheduled activities for Reserve troop 
carrier wings during 1963. Timber Line will be held 
February 9-23 in Alaska and will include 16 Reserve 
C-119s from the 403rd TCWg., of Selfridge AFB, Mich. 
The Reservists will be based at Elmendorf AFB, Alaska 
during the exercise. Also scheduled for this year is Swift 
Strike III, a joint exercise to be conducted in the South- 
eastern U. S., August 1-15. It will include some 200 
Reserve aircraft as well as other Reserve units. Four 
more exercises of a similar nature are booked for 1963, 
with others expected. 



(U 



uestions & 
[\mswers 

/ hold a valid Reserve warrant. Am I considered as 
having a permanent Reserve of the Air Force com- 
missioned grade? No. Both commissioned and warrant 
officers are included in the general term "officers." When 
identified specifically as "commissioned" or "warrant" the 
designation is so limited. 

After completing 20 years of satisfactory service 
either on active duty or as a mobilization assignee, 
I requested that I be reassigned to NARS. I plan to 
continue to earn retirement points thru extension 
courses. Assuming that I meet other requirements, 
am I eligible for promotion to a higher grade? 
Yes. To be eligible for promotion consideration a Reser- 
vist must be in an active status. This means being assigned 
to an active program element and accruing at least 15 
earned points within your retirement year. Assignment 
to NARS with participation through ECI courses would 
fulfill this requirement. 

Con a retired Air Force officer or enlisted man be- 
come a member of the National Guard? Air Force 
policy does not permit retired officers to be members of 
the Ready Reserve. Retired Airmen in highly critical 
skill areas may be members of the Ready Reserve with 
Air Force approval. Currently only Flight Engineers 
AFSC 43174 are approved for the Ready Reserve. 

Can an enlisted member of the Air National Guard 
enter pilot training? Only officers are entered into pilot 
training. An airman must have two years of college and 
meet the requirements for officer status to apply for 
pilot training. He is commissioned before entering training. 

Are members of the Reserve components eligible 
to fly on Air National Guard aircraft? Yes. Reserve 
component personnel in uniform, with proper identifica- 
tion, may ride as passengers on Air National Guard air- 
craft, provided the aircraft is on a duly scheduled training 
flight or on a strictly military mission. 



n 



projection 




Currently, the Air Reserve Forces are rid- 
ing loftily on the crest of acceptance, the result 
of years of groundwork in devising programs, 
polishing methods, and demonstrating willing- 
ness and capability. 

This acceptance forecasts a bright future, 
but also carries a challenge. Difficult obstacles 
must be surmounted and it will take all the ex- 
perience, know-how, and perseverance for which 
the Reserve Forces are noted, to live up to this 
challenge. 



MORE RESPONSIBILITY is the key to the Air 
National Guard's future. The Air Force, based on 
demonstrated capability, is continuing to assign Guard 
units missions of greater importance. The Guard, in 
turn, incurs the obligation to develop an even greater 
degree of capability and professionalism. 

Some 8,500 non-prior service men are scheduled 
to go to Lackland in the next fiscal year for basic 
training as opposed to 6,500 last year. And many 
more of these, up to 75 percent are to go to technical 
training schools. The schools range from 30 days 
to a full year. 

Air transport units will undertake more overseas 
flights and the Air Guard aeromedical units will 
receive more of the modern C-121Cs to boost their 
capability. In the far future there is hope for addi- 



One of Air National Guard's force of fighter-bombers, 
the "Thunderstreak," unleashes its rocket power. Such 
missions supporting TAC will be maintained in '63. 




Successful test drops of Mlrcury space capsule paved 
way for like missions withlEemini and Apollo in '63. 



IITIWIl W IIII Wii WI Hi il w nl 



tional F-102s for ADC units and perhaps some of 
the speedy F-105s before too many years have passed. 
The new Air Guard refueling missions continue to 
gain steam as more units complete conversion. 

Air Guard officials hope to send some com- 
manders and units overseas for training and orienta- 
tion so that they will not be thrown into a completely 
strange environment in case of a similar crisis. 

After successfully meeting the demands of a 
difficult mobilization, and taking corrective action 
to help resolve problems that arose as a result of 
that mobilization, respect for the Air Guard from 
the active establishment and from the nation is at 
an all-time high. Greater support from the gaining 
commands is assured and Air National Guard can 
look ahead to a smooth and ever-increasing role in 
the defense of the nation. This will mean working 
shoulder-to-shoulder with the active Air Force, per- 
forming actual and significant tasks and constantly 
training to remain ALWAYS READY. 

DURING 1963 Air Force Reservists will continue 
servicing Tactical Air Command under project CON 
TAC; participate in Swift Strike III; vie in the Troop 
Carrier and Navigation competitions, and drop more 
Mercury space capsules. To the latter will be added 
drops in support of the Apollo and Gemini programs. 

There are six thousand aircraft hours pro- 
grammed for CONAC units to be flown in support 
of SAGE system acceptance and retrofit tests (Pro- 
ject "Sword Fish"). An increase in money has been 
approved for mandays and school tours. Ten crews 
are qualified for nose cone recovery duty, and it is 
anticipated this number will increase. 

For Air Force Reserve's Dispersal, Aircraft 
Recovery and Reconstitution Program the coming 
year should prove decisive. Following its "fantastic" 
performance during the October crisis, it is only fitting 
that DARR's future be termed "promising." 

Policywise, the Air Force Reserve will continue 
to lean heavily on its Air Reserve Technician pro- 
gram since much credit has gone to the technicians 
for the smoothness of the recent recall. 

The Air Force Reserve's "Big Goal" for '63 
includes: (1) increased capability and faster reac- 
tion to meet any contingency, (2) a major effort 
to produce operationally ready units under the 1.35 
crew ratio, and (3) to push forward with all possible 
speed on the Tactical Air Command reorganization 
of troop carrier units to produce 45 self-sus- 
taining troop carrier groups in the shortest time. 






Primary responsibility for approving or dis- 
approving changes in Reserve policy rests di- 
rectly with the Secretary of Defense. However, 
the magnitude of such a responsibility demands 
that several well-informed sources of informa- 
tion be available to the Secretary in order for 
him to render sound and impartial decisions. 
The January issue of The AIR RESERVIST maga- 
zine focused attention on one of these important 
sources of information, the Reserve Forces Policy 
Board. This article is devoted to a review of the 
active forces' voice in Reserve policy as repre- 
sented by the Defense Secretary's Assistant Sec- 
retary for Manpower, and the Assistant Secre- 
tary's Deputy for Reserve Affairs. 



A Voice In Policy 




Robert S. McNamara 



w. 



hen the Secretary of Defense renders a 
policy decision pertaining to the Reserve components 
of the United States' military establishment, it is 
normally based upon the expert advice of several 
groups of well-informed and highly experienced in- 
dividuals, representing not only the Reserve com- 
ponents but also the active military forces. 

Assuming primary responsibility for the compi- 
lation of such information is the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense (Manpower) Mr. Norman S. Paul and 
his deputy assistant Secretary of Defense (Reserve 
Affairs). Col. James F. Hollingsworth, U. S. Army, 
is currently serving in this position. 

The office of Mr. Paul's Deputy for Reserve Affairs 
is a small one in terms of the size of his staff, but 
the job it does is vital to the Reserve Forces programs 
of all the services. Within the office are representatives 
of the Army, Navy and Air Force. In addition to serv- 
ing as a working staff, each one also acts as a contact 
point and liaison man with his own branch of service. 

In effect, this office is the funnel into which is 
poured each of the Reserve problems and programs 





Mr. Paul 



Col. Hollingsworth 



of the various military services and out of which come 
the solutions, the policies and the overall OSD pro- 
grams on which the components' programs are based. 
Here also is the point at which proposed legislation 
on Reserve Forces must be reviewed, farmed-out to 
the military departments for review, and reworked 
so that such legislation would provide optimum ef- 
fectiveness in accomplishing the overall Defense task. 

The austerity of Mr. Paul's Reserve Affairs staff 
makes for a simplicity which enhances its effectiveness. 
Its dependence on the military departments for spade 
work and basic data assures that proposals which 
originate here incorporate the thinking of the services 
which must use the end product of those proposals. 
Neither does this office neglect the attitude of the 
people who must implement new or altered policy. 

The functional areas of the Reserve Affairs office 
include procurement, administration and training; 
compensation and allowances; morale and welfare; 
ROTC; manpower requirements, and mobilization. 

In the discharge of these responsibilities, Colonel 
Hollingsworth and the members of his staff prepare, 
coordinate and supervise plans and policies, both 
statutory and administrative, pertaining to Reserve 
Forces and ROTC programs. His office evaluates serv- 
ice Reserve manpower requirements, construction pro- 
grams, budget estimates, financial apportionments, 
program changes to five-year force structure, mobili- 
zation requirements and procedures. The office also 
issues guidance to services and recommends desired 
end strengths. 

While responsibility for the decisions concerning 
Reserve policy matters rests primarily with the Secre- 
tary of Defense, those decisions take into consideration 
the professional guidance of such groups as the Office 
of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Manpower;) 
the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense (Reserve 
Affairs), and the Reserve Forces Policy Board (see 
the Jan. '63 issue). 



13 



Though most Air Reservists fly the heavies, the safety factors 
— air and ground — are basically the same for private aircraft. 
CAP pilots can use some tips from the professionals. 






Civil Air Patrol News 



T, 



he Civil Air Patrol — a liaison 
between the Air Force and general 
aviation — is looked to for leadership 
in reversing the unchanging year-to- 
year accident rate of nonmilitary air- 
craft. This observation, made almost 
two years ago by the Flight Safety 
Foundation of New York at the first 
National CAP Aviation Safety Semi- 
nar, still holds true. 

Capt. Charles W. Burkart Jr., chief 
of safety at CAP's national headquar- 
ters, Ellington AFB, Tex., recently 
expressed the desire and need for Air 
Reservists in the know to give an 
assist to their partners in aviation. 
"But this is one of those things," the 
safety officer said, "that would have 
to be worked out between the CAP 
units and Reservists on a basis of 
mutual desire to be of service to the 
national safety program." 

Considering the number of sorties 
and hours flown each year by CAP 
pilots, the accident rate is not alarm- 
ing but any accident rate is high to 
a safety officer — especially when so 
many accidents are caused by a lack 
of understanding, or carelessness of 
the pilot, Burkart declared. 

It is practically impossible to com- 
pare the CAP accident rate with that 
of general aviation, according to Cap- 
tain Burkart, because CAP members 
are required to report even the slight- 
est aircraft damage; in general avia- 
tion, only "substantial damage" is 
normally recorded. 

Reserve pilots are not light-aircraft 
pilots as a rule but they are still con- 
cerned with safety; and the same rules 
apply whether the bird is a C-119 or 
a Cessna 140. The professional ex- 
perience of Reservists could be used 
to great advantage by CAP units op- 
erating aircraft, the safety officer sug- 
gested. The safety program of non- 
military (general) aviation can be 
greatly enhanced by a joint effort. 

Excellent literature on aviation 
safety is published by the Air Force 
and is available to Reservists. Among 
the monthly publications are "Aero- 
space Safety," "Aerospace Accident 
and Maintenance Review," and 



"MATS Flyer." The U. S. Army pub- 
lishes "U. S. Army Aviation Digest," 
while the Navy distributes an excel- 
lent monthly called "Approach." 

The CAP headquarters safety of- 
fice publishes two monthly bulletins, 
"Ground Safety," and "Flying Safety" 
plus a quarterly "Accident Briefs." 
These CAP-USAF publications go to 
all CAP units, Air Force liaison of- 
ficers, various private corporations, 



rule-observing performance in 
air." As an example, he cited 
importance of filing a flight plan 
taking a trip; the few minutes it 
may mean the difference betweer 
and death, or aggravated injur 
exposure if forced down en routJ 

"An overdue plane gets proj 
attention from monitoring poin 
Burkart said. "If you're on the bo< 
it won't be long before CAP or a 
ing sheriff's outfit is up to find y&\ 

With CAP already working m 
Air Reserve units in the emergent] 
recovery program, it has been m 
gested that further coordination com 
be directed toward training in 1 
and ground safety. Reservists m 
have knowledge and experience ml 
offer their services to their local CAP 
units. CAP's chief of safety said R; 
servists can earn points towardH 
tirement by assisting CAP in M 
accident prevention programs. (8b 



The careless tying 
down of light aircraft 
on the ground can lead 
to costly accidents such 
as this one. The ma- 
jority of such accidents 
can be avoided by the 
application of estab- 
lished regulations. 




the National Safety Council, and state 
aviation officials. 

There is a wealth of helpful in- 
formation in these publications use- 
ful to CAP and Air Reservist avia- 
tors; practical suggestions for reduc- 
ing waste through mishaps occurring 
principally on the ground through 
simple carelessness. 

Pilot error is blamed for most ac- 
cidents as borne out by records in 
CAP's national safety office. 

"Air Reserve and CAP pilots alike 
can benefit by taking annual check- 
up rides with highly qualified instruc- 
tors, letting them point out bad fly- 
ing and ground-care habits which may 
have been formed unconsciously," 
Burkart suggested. 

The mission of CAP in the field of 
general aviation safety is to set itself 
up as an example for other private 
pilots to follow, the officer said. "Neat- 
ness and security on the ground is 
parallel in importance to cautious, 



April 1962 issue, The Air Reservist] 
Lectures, briefings and actu; 
courses could be set up to train pilot 
on certain "tricks of the trade 
learned through the experience of R( 
servists with many flying hours undf 
their belts. 

Reservists could offer their service 
to the CAP program by attendin 
CAP wing staff meetings and di 
cussing the program with wing ac 
ministrators, Burkart suggested. 

It is through "aircrew professiona 
ism" and flight safety surveys that th 
Air Force has been able to reduce ii 
accident rate; planned profession! 
approach to accident prevention 
the key. The CAP-USAF safety of 
cer believes that much of this prt 
fessionalism can be transmitted t 
CAP aviators by the Air Forci 
trained Reservists, and the combim 
tion will lend itself as a vital contr 
bution to CAP's program of accidei 
prevention in general aviation. 



14 



There would not be approximately $1.5 billion for space research and development 
in this year's budget if the Executive and the Congress did not agree that there is a role 
for the military in space. 

Dr. Edward C. Walsh /Executive Secretary, National Aeronautics and Space Council 



rACTICAL NUCLEAR WEAPONS are little understood. 
Soviet strategists have been quoted as saying that 
'nuclear weapons already constitute the foundation 
)f firepower for all types of armed forces." 

That there are various kinds of nuclear weapons 
s not widely understood by the general public. To 
nany people a nuclear weapon is a nuclear weapon — 
ind it is symbolized frequently in cartoons as a giant as 
all as a skyscraper. 

There is a vast but not widely understood distinc- 
ion among various types of nuclear weapons that 
ire theoretically possible. A hypothetical example: 
'The difference between a .01 kiloton weapon and a 
00 megaton weapon would be profound, and yet 
>oth would carry the nuclear label. The former would 
>e 10 million times less powerful than the latter, 
ind only 2 times more powerful than the conventional 
World War II blockbusters. In the popular image, 
lowever, the tactical nuclear weapon is often equated 
rith the super-bomb. 

It is not necessary, nor is it desirable to wreak 
ndiscriminate havoc and destruction in order to 
leutralize or destroy military targets in limited war. 
/lodern delivery systems make it possible to achieve 
;reat accuracy in placing weapons on target and 
echnology has made it possible to tailor the size of 
he nuclear yield to fit the situation. The basic target 
ystem for nuclear weapons, as in all conflicts, is the 
nemy's military capability — his troop concentrations, 
^gistics facilities, air bases, attack routes, and the like. 

When authorized by the President, the introduction 
f appropriate-sized nuclear weapons could insure an 
arly termination of hostilities, reduce casualties 
mong American and friendly forces, and limit, not 
xpand, the amount of economic disruption and des- 
ruction that has always been associated with pro- 
jnged campaigns. 

RIMARY AEROSPACE FORCE. That the Air Force 
as become the primary aerospace force of the Na- 
ion was clearly indicated by the Secretary of the 
iir Force in a talk to the National Rocket Club. 
Ixcerpts : 

"No job in military history, or even in the whole 
antastic record of Twentieth Century exploitation of 
:chnology, seems to me to equal the job that was 
lone in bringing the strategic missile force into being 
—Atlas, Titan, Polaris, and Minuteman. . . . 

"The Air Force missile work provided much of the 
jchnology base for space flight. Military-developed 
oosters have lifted virtually all the U. S.- devices 
lto orbit. 

"Now, approval by the Secretary of Defense of the 
evelopment of Titan III, which combines liquid and 
olid fuel technologies, starts a new big step for the 
lilitary from ICBM's to a true space booster. 

"The space program of the Department is almost 
:ntirely the responsibility of the Air Force. As you 



know, it is a very large and very important program. 
The Department of the Air Force is responsible today 
for supporting nearly 25 percent of the entire Federal 
budget, not just in Defense, but overall, and the Air 
Force supports about this fraction of all research and 
development in America. At least 40 percent of this 
effort is devoted to space programs and projects in 
the Department of Defense." 

ARMS CONTROL. In a thought-provoking article on 
arms control in the December Air Force Space Digest 
magazine, Maj. Gen. Dale O. Smith writes: 

"One presumed drawback to a bomber strategy is 
the slow time of flight as compared to a missile. Some 
argue that this slow delivery time is what consigns 
the bomber to a first-strike category, that it would 
have to get started before the other side was aware 
that a decision for war had been made. But in our 
hands, since our political policy is to withstand the 
first blow no matter how we are armed, the slowness 
of the bomber is not particularly significant. As a 
second-strike weapon, the bomber will reach and 
destroy enemy launch pads long before a second 
enemy missile can be wheeled into place and the 
countdown completed for a second wave assault. 
Considering this, it would seem that a nuclear bomber 
might more accurately be categorized as a second- 
strike weapon, if such categorization is feasible at all." 

PUBLIC RELATIONS and U. S. security. Among com- 
ments on a report of a senior officer board studying 
qualitative educational requirements for the Infor- 
mation career area were these by two retired Air 
Force generals. 

Lt. Gen. Ira C. Eaker said: "I am greatly reassured 
that a board of senior Air Force officers such as 
yours has taken the time and trouble to recognize the 
importance of public relations to the security of our 
country, and to the Air Force and its mission. It is 
reassuring to me as a citizen to see this very important 
phase of military life at last being recognized for its 
true worth and significance." 

Said Gen. Thomas D. White, former Chief of Staff: 
"I believe no more important career area exists than 
the Information field." 



Air 

Force Point 

01 View 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



Return Requested 



USAK Recurring Publication 
No. 80-H-2-63-326.2M 




"Individual Survival and Recovery," CON AC 
Course No. 45-002, is the topic of conversation 
every Wednesday night for 90 Reserve officers of the 
9356th AFRS, Canoga Park, Calif. Lt. Col. Amos 
Fowler, commander, uses a Stereographic Projection 
World map to illustrate an important point. A tten- 
tiveness is registered by MSgt. Anthony J. Pirrera (I) 
and SMSgt. Olen B. Brock (r) during recent semi- 
annual meeting of MA TS Reserve Forces Policy Com- 
mittee held at Scott AFB, III. Pirrera, 7th Aero- 
medical Evacuation Group, of Coraopolis, Pa., and 
Brock, 128th Air Transport Squadron of the Georgia 
ANG at Marietta, Ga., represent two-thirds of en- 
listed members on the committee. MSgt. James E. 
Asbury of St. Louis, is not shown. % Admiring their 
new 1st lieutenant bars are five flight nurses assigned 
to the 103rd Aeromedical Evacuation Flight of the 
111th Air Transport Group, Pennsylvania ANG. The 
five, all registered nurses, are (l-r) 1st Lieutenants' 
Sarah Fenner; Carol Vincent; Barbara Murphy; Elsie 
Jane Murphy; and Carol Murphy. Barbara and Carol 
Murphy are twins. Elsie Jane is no relation. | Air 
Guardsmen of the 125th Air Transport Squadron, 
Tulsa, Okla., who made an around-the-world flight 
last November (see January Air Reservist) while de- 
livering 14 cattle to Afghanistan, have received letters 
of appreciation from U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan 
John M. Steeves. General LeMay added his congrat- 
ulations as did Ma]. Gen. D. W. McGowan, Chief 
of the National Guard Bureau. Front row (l-r): Lt. 
J. W. Latimer; Lt. D. E. Anderson; Capt. J. P. Rowe; 
Ma]. F. L. Slane; Capt. J. W . Morgan Jr., and Capt. 

B. E. Walls. Standing (l-r) are: SSgt. R. B. Smith; 
MSgt. T. I. Tucker; MSgt. H. J. Roberts; MSgt. J. 

C. Dodson, and CMSgt. W. A. McLeod. 



Q - 










• 2-6:i-6r)24yr, 







MARCH-APRIL 1%3 



the air reservist 



I 




H 
H 



■ 



how it 



off. . . 8 



THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE AIR RESERVE FORC 



the air reservist 

Vol. XV— No. 3 April 1963 

AIR FORCE RESERVE 
CIVIL AIR PATROL AIR NATIONAL GUARD 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 
Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 

EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 



The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of HQ USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, B.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq. USAF. 



scanning 



tfw air reservist 




Our cover calls attention to USAF't 
Reserve Recovery Program. In it» form- 
ative itage it proved a found invest- 
ment in the national concept of "total 
force" deterrent strength. 



m* a »r\e I S e 1 -e c - 

BOARDS tion boards 

will con- 
vene at Headquarters USAF on April 
8, to select and recommend regular 
and Reserve warrant officers for 
permanent promotion to grades of 
CWO-2, 3 and 4. 

The boards will consider regular 
Air Force warrant officers serving as 
warrant officers and those serving on 
extended active duty as Reserve com- 
missioned officers. 

Reserve warrant officers to be con- 
sidered include those serving on ex- 
tended active duty as warrant officers 
who have Reserve and Air National 
Guard warrant appointments; and 
AFRes and ANGUS warrant officers 
not on extended active duty in that 
category. Warrant officers who do not 
have Reserve warrant appointments 
will not be considered. 

The CWO-2 board will select only 
those officers with a permanent date 
of rank or promotion service date on 
or before June 30, 1961. CWO-3 and 
CWO-4 selection requirements in- 
clude a date of rank or PSD on or 
before June 30, 1958. 

Quotas for promotion under this 
action have not been announced. 



A Board will convene at the Air Re- 
serve Records Center May 6-17, to 
consider approximately 6,300 lieu- 
tenant colonels, both on and off ex- 
tended active duty, who are eligible 
for promotion to the grade of colonel 
(over-all vacancies). To be eligible, 
officers must hold a PSD on or be- 
fore June 30, 1958. Eligible officers 
are encouraged to submit communi- 
cations under the provisions of Sec. 
8362, Title 10, USC, and para. 3, 
AFR 45-16. They should write to: 
President, Air Force Reserve Selec- 
tion Board, Air Reserve Records 
Center, 3800 York St., Denver 5, 
Colo. All communications must ar- 
rive prior to date board convenes. 



A total of 1,112 non-active duty cap- 
tains have been promoted to the 
permanent grade of major in the Air 
Force Reserve. Promotions of those 
selected will be accomplished by 
Headquarters, Air Reserve Records 
Center. Effective dates for most of 
the promotions will be during calen- 




Air Reserve 
Forces News 



dar year 1963, with some not b 
coming effective until 1964, and 
limited number of nominees getti 
retroactive promotions to their in 
grade. A total of 1,725 captains wj 
considered by the board that cc 
vened at the Air Reserve Recoi 
Center last December. In addition 
those selected, there were 336 eli; 
bles deferred for the first time a 
277 for the second time. 



The fa 

I est guns 

the Gu; 

are now practicing their quick-dr 
in their own school at Portland, O 

The new school for Air Natio 
Guard Radar Intercept Officers v 
established at Portland Internatio 
Airport in July 1962. The first cl 
was graduated in January 1963. 

Instructors were transferred fr 
James Connally AFB, Tex., wl 
the Air Force RIO school there \ 
closed. Five additional F-89J tw 
jet "Scorpion" fighter-intercept 
were assigned to the 123rd Figr 
Interceptor Squadron of the Ore] 
ANG, together with an increase 
support personnel. 

Chief instructor is Capt. He 
Hines, chosen RIO of the year 
1 962 by the Night Fighters Asso 
tion in annual convention. 

Brig. Gen. G. L. Doolittle, cc 
mander OAG, is school command; 
Maj. James Thomas is commande 

Students include mostly sea 
lieutenants who have compk 
ROTC courses and won their nav 
tor wings, a prerequisite for t 
school. They get 462 hours of tn 
ing in an intensive 1 5-week cou 
including about 50 hours flying ti 

Portland was chosen for the scf 
after a survey of all ANG ba 
partly because about 75 percenl 
flying time logged there is on ac 
instruments. Efficiency and coopi 
tion of the civilian traffic con 
organization is outstanding. Rs 
and navigation aids are of the t 

The radar environment eno 
passes SAGE and manual con 
over land and with picket ship; 
sea. Ocean firing ranges are ha 
and extensive military and civi 
facilities are available for recover 
aircraft in all kinds of weather. 



The quality of the RIO training 
as attested in December, 1962 when 
apt. James R. Alley, of the 123rd 
ISq., found his aircraft on fire and 
erted his RIO student, 2nd Lt. John 
. Loacker. The two officers rode the 
jrning plane down to a perilous 500 
et trying to guide it to an open area 
:fore ejecting. Both landed safely. 



he Extension Course Institute re- 
inds its Reserve students that June 
) is an important deadline for many 

them. It is the date they must com- 
ete their ECI study for the year to 
>tain the desired points. (Reservists 
l inactive duty gain one credit point 

their Reserve program for every 3 
>urs of ECI study they complete.) 
le Institute urges Reservists to 
hedule their study for the next 
onths to insure completion prior to 
eir anniversary date. ECI has acti- 
ted new courses in three different 
reer areas. These courses are in the 
re maintenance, comptroller, and 
edical career fields, respectively. 



FLYING 



Flying 
H status or- 
d e r s for 
any Air Force Reserve officers were 
rminated on March 9, 1963. 
Authority for automatic termina- 
>n of flying status orders for officers 
>t assigned to positions requiring a 
rrent aeronautical rating is para. 
13, AFM 35-13, Sept. 10, 1962, 
ying Status, Aeronautical Ratings, 
;signations and Jump Status. 



For Reserve officers not on extend- 
ed active duty on September 10, 1962, 
flying status orders terminate on 
March 9, 1963, provided they had not 
performed rated duties within the 
past year (since March 10, 1962). 

For all others, flying status orders 
terminate one year following discon- 
tinuance of extended active duty or 
one year from date of last assign- 
ment to a rated position. 

Air Reserve Records Center will 
terminate the flying status orders of 
all rated officers assigned to ARRC, 
(Non-Affiliated Reserve Section, In- 
eligible Reserve Section, Inactive Sta- 
tus List Reserve Section), as they 
meet the above criteria. 

Termination of flying status orders 
is an administrative action that indi- 
cates an officer has been retired, 
ceases to hold a valid commission in 
the Air Force or its Reserve com- 
ponents or has not performed rated 
duties within the past year. Termina- 
tion of flying status orders under the 
above should not be confused with 
a suspension of flying status orders 
which would indicate removal for a 
cause. Termination of flying status or- 
ders does not affect previous awards 
of aeronautical ratings. 

If an officer whose flying status or- 
ders have been terminated seeks a 
rated position in a Reserve unit and 
the unit commander recommends his 
assignment, flying status may be re- 
stored. Restoration is contingent upon 
his assignment to the rated position 
and approval by Hq. CON AC. 



CONFERENCES 



' A n ex- 
periment in 
: personnel 
management," is the term used by 
Brig. Gen. I. G. Brown, assistant 
chief, National Guard Bureau for Air, 
in opening the first meeting of the 
Air National Guard's Air Technician 
Advisory Committee in January. 

The "experiment" is an attempt 
by the Bureau to get help from the 
field in managing technician person- 
nel problems occurring at ANG in- 
stallations and for the committee, as 
representatives of the field, to obtain 
a more complete understanding of the 
problems the Bureau faces at the 
Pentagon level. 

The committee's job is first to eval- 
uate requests for changes or addi- 
tions in the air technician program 
from the field but also, and just as 
important, the group's job is to help 
the Bureau substantiate each request 
it approves. Armed with these rec- 
ommendations, the Bureau hopes for 
greater success, as General Brown 
stated, ". . . in convincing the review 
authorities of the Air Force, the De- 
partment of Defense, the Bureau of 
the Budget and both houses of Con- 
gress, that our civilian personnel pro- 
gram is the most economical and the 
best answer to maintaining the capa- 
bility of the Air National Guard." 

The committee is made up of rep- 
resentatives from 20 of the technician 
career areas in the Air Guard includ- 
ing aircraft maintenance, weapons, 

see next page 



7 lanked by Maj. Gens. Winston P. Wilson (right) and 
leorge J. Hearn (Ga. ANG), Brig. Gen. I. G. Brown, 
sst. chief, NGB for Air, chairs Feb. ANG conference. 



Reserve Brig. Gens, informed of promotion at ROA meeting 
(l-r) Joseph Lingle, Roger Smith, Charles Heidingsf elder Jr., 
John Lang Jr., Donald Campbell, and James McPartlin. 





Judges (l-r) M/Gs N. Tidwell, A. Kuhfeld, 
B/G T. King, preside at moot training ses- 
sion of Reserve Court of Military Appeals. 



Air Guardsmen load 146th ATransWg., C-97, 
Van Nuys, Cal., for mercy airlift of goods 
from L.A. to its Sister-City, Salvador, Brazil. 




fellow F-IOOC pilots congratulate Capt. J. 
Youngblood (top) us landing marks five safe 
Hying years for lH4lh TFGp., Kansas ANG. 



scanning 



supply, communications, etc. M< 
bers range in rank from briga< 
general to major. Each was ha 
picked by the Bureau, upon nomi 
tion by his state, on the basis of | 
sonnel management capability. 



The ANG Commanders' Call C 
ference followed in February, dr 
ing approximately 500 Air Gu 
commanders to Savannah, Ga. 
purpose was to bring them up-to-< 
on ANG plans and programs du 
the current and next fiscal year. 




General I. G. Brown served 
moderator for the two-day con 
ence. In his opening address, he i 
phasized that the Air Guard's l 
had gained increasing importance 
the past two years because of 
Berlin and Cuban crises. 

"The Air Guard," said Gen 
Brown, "is now considered a de 
rent force against both limited 
general war. No longer is it a fore 
be used only in the event of \ 
Rather, it is an in-being force wl 
the Air Force and Department of 
fense have come to recognize as 
organization capable of immed 
response. 

"Improving the manning of 
Air Guard is one of the esser 
steps necessary to maintain this 
tion's ability to deter a war. 

"As President Kennedy explai 
after the Berlin call-up, the men v 
mobilized to 'Prevent a war, no 
fight one." 



Air Reserve 
Forces News 



Maj. Gen. Winston P. Wilson, dep- 
f chief of the National Guard Bu- 
rn, outlined some of the problems 
:ing the Air Guard by underlining 
i shortage of equipment and the 
;d for personnel. 

"'Because a large number of pilots 
nained on active duty with the Air 
rce following the Berlin mobili- 
:ion," said the general, "the Air 
lard now needs approximately 300 
ots. In addition, there is a critical 
Drtage of experienced airmen, many 
whom also remained on active duty. 
"The Air Guard will have to 'live 
th' equipment shortages for some 
ie to come. A large number of 
4F aircraft were retained by the 
»ular establishment following the 
rlin mobilization, and these planes 
II remain with the active Air Force 
• quite some time before they are 
urned to the Air Guard. In the 
■antime, there appears to be no 
mediate solution for obtaining air- 
ift replacements." 
To meet the personnel needs of the 
r Guard, commanders will have to 
:ruit approximately 5,000 men and 
II retain their present personnel 
ength by May 1, Raymond Hig- 
is, the Bureau's air personnel chief, 
d the conferees. 



Shortly following Air National 
jard's conference, the Reserve Offi- 
rs Association conducted its Mid- 
inter Council meeting in Washing- 
i, DC. 

The conference held last month was 
ended by active and Reserve lead- 
? from each of the services. Also, 
r the first time, representatives of 
2 Inter-Allied Confederation of Re- 
rve Officers (CIOR), led by its 
esidcnt. Prince Peter of Greece, 
*re in attendance. 
Prominent Air Reserve Forces 
cakers at the two-day conference 
;re Lt. Gen. E. J. Timberlake, com- 
ander. Continental Air Command, 
aj. Gen. Curtis R. Low, assistant 
ief of staff for Reserve Forces, and 
r. John A. Lang, deputy for Re- 
rvc and ROTC Affairs. 
The immediate need for an im- 
rovement in the manning situation 
rought the following statement from 
eneral Low: "I believe the answer 
es principally with the individual 
3mmanders and the members of 



each unit. No amount of advertising, 
publicity, machine runs, pamphlets, 
referrals, or whatever, is going to 
cure the problem. The local com- 
manders and their people must get 
out and do a person-to-person selling 
job, not only on each qualified pro- 
spect but, more important, on the 
trained men we must retain." 

General Low called upon the ROA 
to assist in lessening existing reluc- 
tance on the part of employers and 
families to allow Reservists to be ac- 
tive in a fast reaction Reserve Force. 

Mr. Lang, after touching on the 
three major problem areas (planning, 
manning and equipping,) summed up 
his remarks by presenting the chal- 
lenge that faces all Reservists, that 
of maintaining the kind of readiness 
posture exhibited by the Reserve 
Forces during Berlin and Cuba. 

And General Timberlake stressed 
the need for a, ". . . better interface 
with the programmed regular estab- 
lishment of the present and future," 
suggesting that the method of achiev- 
ing this common boundary between 
the Regular and Reserve forces will 
rest on the Reserve Forces contribut- 
ing more to the development and ex- 
tension of military policy. 



TRAINING 



I U p d a t - 

|| ed ''"c o m- 

: bat readi- 
ness" is required by our modern Air 
Force programs. This requires flexi- 
bility. Rapid changes in weapons sys- 
tems and related techniques make 
continuous training mandatory. 

Air Force Regulation 50-11, re- 
vised last November, is directed to- 
wards "readiness," and affects every 
member of the Air Reserve Forces. 

Lt. Col. Edwin V. Balch, chief of 
Reserve training, Plans and Programs 
Division for Hq USAF, emphasized 
the need for the revision. 

"Primarily what we attempted to 
accomplish with this rewrite of AFR 
50-1 1 was to iron out some of the 
problems that were brought to our 
attention during the Berlin contin- 
gency and the early days of the Cuban 
mobilization. One example is the 
non-standard administrative proce- 
dures that were utilized in the Re- 
serve Forces as compared to those of 
the active establishment. 



"Actually, we found that we had 
in effect, two sets of books. The Re- 
serve Forces were using one form 
and the regular establishment anoth- 
er. Naturally, when the Reservists 
came on active duty, everything was 
necessarily aligned with the active 
establishment. AFR 50-1 1 is an at- 
tempt to simplify and standardize 
procedures for training and adminis- 
tration of the Reserve training pro- 
gram by aligning it with that of the 
regular establishment." 

The revision describes the various 
actions involved in training individ- 
uals to meet Air Force requirements 
in areas of counseling, training, and 
testing toward attaining or maintain- 
ing readiness and career progression 
appropriate for each individual. It 
defines each of the actions required 
and delineates the responsibilities for 
carrying them out. 

It states that the training of Re- 
servists to fill mobilization positions 
must be tailored to refresh and in- 
crease the prior knowledge and skills 
of individuals assigned or being as- 
signed to positions within the mobili- 
zation requirement. This training fol- 
lows active establishment methods. 

Individual training includes techni- 
cal, professional abilities, and the 
military capabilities of the individual. 
lt applies to both the regulars and 
the Reserves. Its purpose as applied 
to the Air Reserve Forces is to fill 
the Air Force needs for a special kind 
of manpower in reserve to produce 
personnel who are both fighting men 
and technicians. They are trained in 
the intricacies of modern warfare, 
and are ready and willing to enter the 
active military service on a moment's 
notice. They also are capable of 
growth to meet demands of an ever- 
changing technological military 
world. 

The very nature and purpose of 
individual Reserve training requires 
a systematic procedure. This includes 
determining needs, providing training 
outlines, training, and recording 
training by defining the scope and 
level of acquired skills and knowledge 
attained. It requires ready access to 
documentation that clearly defines 
the individual's level of skill and abil- 
ity to perform the duties immediately 
upon mobilization. 

see next page 



Maj. James Thomas instructs 2nd Lt. Gerald Spehar 
at ANG's new Radar Intercept Officer school, Port- 
land, Ore. Students get "live" training in F89J jets. 




Hit "iiP 


cijjSLi 







An item of primary importance in 
the revision is the rating system for 
airmen, AF Form 75, "Airman Per-I 
formance Report." This is to be ac-l 
complished on all actively participat- 
ing Ready Reserve airmen in accord- 
ance with AFM 39-62. 



MSgt. John Mills (one of over 700 Guardsmen) 
gets S. Carolina's Exceptional Service Medal for 
Berlin (risis duty, (r) Lt. Col. Robert Corbett. 



Every man is entitled to his day in 
court. The military life is no excep- 
tion. In keeping wth this, members 
of the Air Force Reserve assigned to 
The Judge Advocate General's De- 
partment participate in a continuous 
training program designed to keep 
them knowledgeable in military law 
and procedures. The basis for the 
training program is the "on-the-job- 
training" principle. Reservists review 
actual legal problems and cases dur- 
ing their periods of training. This 
applies both to military justice (court- 
martial work) and to civil law mat- 
ters affecting the Air Force. This 
training paid off in a big way during 
the Cuban crisis. JAG Reservists 
were on the job long before sunup 
on the first morning, providing legal 
aid and assistance to Reservists. 

In keeping with this program, Re- 
servists assigned to the Military Jus- 
tice Division, OTJAG, Hq., USAF, 
have reviewed a record of trial by 
court-martial, prepared briefs and 
made arguments before a "Reserve 
Court of Military Appeals" on Feb- 
ruary 26, 1963. In actual practice, 
the United States Court of Military 
Appeals is comprised of three civilian 
judges. The Court is sometimes re- 
ferred to as the Supreme Court of the 
courts-martial system. However, for 
this training period, the judges of the 
bench were Maj. Gen. Albert M. 
Kuhfeld, USAF, The Judge Advocate 
General, Maj. Gen. M. R. Tidwell 
Jr., USAF, the assistant Judge Advo- 
cate General, and Brig. Gen. Thomas 
H. King, mobilization assignee, as- 
sistant JAG. 

The Reservists preparing the Gov- 
ernment's side of the case were Lt. i 
Col. Fred Smithson, Lt. Col. Joseph 
F. Ryan, Capt. Fred Freedman, Capt. 
Phillip Zeidman, Capt. Valentine 
Grundaman and Capt. Kenneth Elias- 
berg. Those preparing the defense's 
case were Reservists, Lt. Col. Sidney 
Ulmann, Maj. Edward Aptaker, Maj. 
Eugene Shora, Maj. Warner Strupp, 
Capt. Thomas Garrett, Capt. William 
Tennant and Capt. Bernard Wray. 

The case cited as U.S. v. Albad 
was chosen because of the number 
of interesting legal questions present- 
ed on appeal. Previously the Reserv- 
ist's acting as counsel argued the case 
before a Reserve Board of Review 



scamting Air Reserve 
Forces News 



omposed of three senior Judge Ad- 
ocate Reservists. After hearing oral 
irgument by counsel the Reserve 
Joard of Review reversed the deci- 
ion of the court-martial which origi- 
lally tried the case at base level. It 
vas then certified to Reserve Court 
>f Military Appeals for training. 

Vtore than 5,000 Standby Reserve 
)fficers of the various Services have 
volunteered for duty with state and 
ocal Civil Defense activities since 
he Department of Defense approved 
)f their support last year. 

Of the volunteers, more than 3,600 
have already been processed by CD 
'egional offices. It is expected that 
•equirements may approach 10,000 
Allowing a full review of the program. 

CD officials in Washington indicat- 
sd that the best procedure for a 
standby Reserve officer to join is to 
nake his availability known to his lo- 
:al CD director who is authorized to 
Forward the request for assignment 
to the appropriate regional office. 

Wanted are officers with planning, 
jxecutive or administrative experi- 
ence in almost all of the specialties 
:ommon to the military services — 
particularly in the engineering, opera- 
tional, intelligence, communications, 
transportation, and logistic fields. 

The following maximum numbers 
of retirement credit points may be 
awarded for the service: 2 in any one 
day; 3 per week; 6 per month; 13 in 
any quarter, and a maximum of 60 
per retirement year. 



SAFETY 



|§ Last year 

• '' was the 
■ safest fly- 
ing year in Air National Guard his- 
tory, according to information re- 
leased in February at the ANG Com- 
mander's Conference. 

During the past calendar year the 
Air Guard flew 318,601 hours and 
had an accident rate of only 7.85 per 
100,000 flying hours, Maj. Robert 
D. Waller, flying safety officer with 
the National Guard Bureau, reported. 

The 1962 major accident rate com- 
pared favorably with 1961 when the 
Guard had 13 accidents per 100,000 
flying hours. 



Waller also reported that Guards- 
men in 1962 flew the T-33 jet trainer 
more than 36,000 hours without a 
single major accident. 

The Guard's 1962 accident record 
was slightly higher than the Air Force 
rate of 5.7 accidents per 100,000 
hours, Waller said. However, he ex- 
plained that Air Guard flying was 
accomplished primarily in jet air- 
craft where accidents normally occur 
with greater frequency than they do 
with propeller driven aircraft. 

Material failure caused 52 percent 
of the 25 accidents the Guard had. 

Waller reported that 10 of the 12 
ejections from disabled aircraft dur- 
ing the year were successful. He em- 
phasized that 8 of the ejections were 
below 1,000 feet altitude. Six of the 
eight were successful, he said, includ- 
ing one on the ground. 

Named were 62 units which had 
flown without an accident during 
1962. Representatives from these 
units received citations from Maj. 
Gen. Winston P. Wilson and Brig. 
Gen. I. G. Brown. 

Units were: 1 17th Tactical Recon- 
naissance Group, Birmingham, Ala.; 
189th TacReconGp., Little Rock, 
Ark.; 144th Air Transport Squadron, 
Anchorage, Alaska; 161st Air Trans- 
port Group, Phoenix and 162nd 
Fighter Group, Tucson, Ariz.; 129th 
Troop Carrier Group, Hayward, 
144th FGp., Fresno, 163rd FGp., 
Ontario and 146th ATGp. (2 squad- 
rons), Van Nuys, Calif. 

Also: 166th ATGp., Wilmington, 
Del.; 116th ATGp., Marietta and 
165th ATGp., Savannah, Ga.; 124th 
FGp., Boise, Idaho; 126th Air Re- 
fueling Group, Chicago and 182nd 
FGp., Peoria, 111.; 122nd Tactical 
Fighter Group, Ft. Wayne, Ind.; 
132nd FGp., Des Moines, Iowa; 
184th TFGp., Wichita and 190th 
TRGp., Hutchinson, Kan. 

Also: 123rd TacReconGp., Louis- 
ville, Ky.; 159th FGp., New Orleans, 
La>; 101st FGp., Bangor, Me.; 135th 
TCGp., and 175th TFGp., Baltimore, 
Md.; 102nd TFGp., Boston and 
104th TFGp., Westfield, Mass.; 
110th TacReconGp., Battle Creek 
and 191st TacReconGp., Detroit, 
Mich.; 133rd ATGp., St. Paul and 
148th FGp., Duluth, Minn.; 183rd 



Aeromedical Transport Sq. (AMT- 
Sq.), Jackson and 186th TacRecon- 
Gp., Meridian, Miss.; 139th ATGp., 
St. Joseph, Mo.; 157th ATGp., Man- 
chester, N. H.; 106th Aeromedical 
Transport Gp. (AMTGp.), Brooklyn, 
109th ATGp., Schenectady, N. Y. 

Also: 108th TFGp., McGuire 
AFB, 150th AMTSq., Newark and 
177th TFGp., Atlantic City, N. J.; 
152nd TacReconGp., Reno, Nev.; 
156th AMTSq., Charlotte, N. C; 
119th FGp., Fargo, N. D.; 121st 
TFGp., Columbus and 160th Air Re- 
fueling Group, Wilmington, Ohio; 
137th ATGp., Oklahoma City and 
138th ATGp., Tulsa, Okla,; 111th 
ATGp., Philadelphia, 140th AMT- 
Sq., Olmstead AFB and 147th AMT- 
Sq., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Also 143rd TCGp., Providence, 
R. I.; 1 14th FGp., Sioux Falls, S. D.; 
1 18th ATGp., Nashville, 134th FGp., 
Knoxville and 164th ATGp., Mem- 
phis, Tenn.; 147th FGp., Houston 
and 149th FGp., San Antonio, Tex.; 
151st ATGp., Salt Lake City, Utah; 
158th FGp., Burlington, Vt.; 167th 
AMTSq., Martinsburg, W. Va.; 
115th FGp., Madison and 127th 
ARGp., Milwaukee. Wise; 187th 
AMTSq., Cheyenne, Wyo. 



MISSIONS 



• : Early Sun- 
day morn- 
i n g, De- 
cember 30, 1962, a C-97 loaded with 
nearly 15,000 pounds of food, medi- 
cal supplies, clothing and toys, depart- 
ed Van Nuys, Calif., bound for South 
America on a special mission. These 
much needed goods were gifts from 
the citizens of Los Angeles to their 
sister-city, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. 
The material was being airlifted to 
Sister Irma Dulce's sanitarium, the 
"'Albergue Santo Antonio" — where 
each year thirty to forty thousand 
hungry, sick, destitute and needy Bra- 
zilians receive food, shelter and med- 
ical attention. 

This humanitarian mission also 
provided dollar-saving training for 
the 146th Air Transport Wing of the 
California Air National Guard. Gen. 
Robert D. Campbell, commander of 
the 146th, realized the value of this 

see SCANNING page 14 



recovery 




A 



ir Force Reservists from 
practically every state in the nation 
are in a constant state of readiness 
to respond to local or national 
emergencies — their augmentation 
capabilities ranging from support 
during an all-out nuclear encounter 
to that required by a contingency 
type of action. These Reservists are 
members of Air Force Reserve's 
Recovery Program. 

Atomic power and the consequent 
possibility of a nuclear exchange led 
military strategists to analyze the 
potential effects of such a war and 
to develop a recovery concept de- 
signed to expedite the reconstitu- 
tion of Air Force's capabilities dur- 
ing and after an attack. 

The overall Air Force recovery 
concept evolved as a three part plan, 
time-phased in relation to a nuclear 
attack. The first, or pre-attack phase 
considers those actions which can 
be taken to reduce the potential 
damage level, and are to be accom- 
plished by the active Air Force as 
part of their normal operations. The 
second phase — the attack phase — 
considers those actions which can 
be taken to minimize the immediate 
effects of a nuclear attack. The re- 
quirements of this phase also could 
be accomplished best by the active 
forces with their established disas- 
ter control teams. 

The need for additional help be- 
came increasingly evident as the re- 
quirements of Phase Three, the post- 
attack period, were considered. The 
post-attack phase considers those 
tasks which must be accomplished 
during and immediately following an 
attack to recover residual Air Force 
resources and to reconstitute an ef- 
fective Air Force capability. Includ- 
ed in this phase arc tasks such as 
the support of aircraft and aircrews 
which land at recovery bases after 
completing combat missions or as a 
result of dispersing from their home 
bases; the evacuation of residual 
personnel and materiel from disas- 
ter areas; the concentration of resid- 
ual resources at recovery bases for 
rehabilitation, inventory, and redis- 
tribution; the reeonstitution of deci- 
mated units and establishment of re- 



placement units from residual re- 
sources; the re-establishment of 
communications and transportation 
systems, and general rehabilitation. 

As the Recovery concept devel- 
oped it became obvious that large 
numbers of Air Force Reservists 
were strategically located, previously 
trained in Air Force specialties, and 
immediately available in the event 
of attack, to perform a major por- 
tion of the recovery and reeonsti- 
tution effort. To incorporate this 
Reserve potential in the Recovery 
program, significant changes were 
made in the Air Force Reserve In- 
dividual Training program, under 
the Revised Management Plan. 

However, since the Recovery con- 
cept was new and there was no 
established precedent for this type 
of unit and no training manuals to 
go by, seven "pilot" or experimental 
recovery groups were established on 
September 1, 1960, for the purpose 
of identifying and if possible resolv- 
ing problem areas. 

The pilot recovery units were 
given very little assistance in the way 
of equipment, facilities or financial 
support. They were given a mission 
— they were told how important that 
mission was, and they were told to 
use their own initiative, ambition 
and native capabilities to get the job 
done. Although this was an unusual 
and most unorthodox approach to 
developing mission effectiveness, 
the results exceeded expectations. 
The pilot units not only were suc- 
cessful in recruiting personnel and 
organizing their resources, they for- 
mulated logical and effective train- 
ing programs and within their test 
period developed capabilities for 
supporting recovery requirements. 

Based on the results of the nine- 
month test program, 75 more Air 
Force Reserve Recovery Groups and 
200 squadrons came into being on 
or shortly after July 1, 1961. To- 
day, although the complete program 
is still new, the Air Force has in 
fact, the basis for a substantial re- 
coyery a nd reeonstitution potential- 

Last year's crisis in the Caribbean 
saw many of these recovery units 
voluntarily add their abilities and 
resources in support of Tactical Air 
Command, Air Defense Command 
and the Strategic Air Command. 
When SAC, TAC and ADC aircraft 
arrived at many civil airfields, Re- 
serve recovery units were called on 
to assist in giving support. 

Typical of the swift response and 
degree of readiness of these recov- 
ery units was that of the 8378th Air 
Force Reserve Recovery Group and 




Army, Navy and Airm 
sponsored by H441 st AFRi 
their resources in assisting 




Refueling crew of the 921 
Ohio, assist in dispersal n 
Firefighters and Reserve A 




Decontamination phase o) 
shielded Reservists of 95. 
as they hose down a SAC 



V 



! 




: sts unite at meeting 
Fla., to discuss use of 
wees in contingencies. 



v Sq., Port Columbus, 
of Recovery Program, 
standby a SAC B-47 . 




■ogram is practiced by 
y Sq., Denver, Colo., 
-om radioactive dust." 



its 9223rd AFRRSq. at Port JTo- 
lumbus, Ohio. The group com- 
mander received information shortly 
after ten o'clock on the evening of 
October 22nd that his unit's support 
might be required. An hour and a 
quarter later, that same commander 
was at his unit's airstrip to meet the 
first aircraft as it arrived. By three 
o'clock of the following morning, 
33 officers and 63 airmen of the 
group and squadron had responded. 
Other recovery units supported 
the dispersal to civilian airports of 
ADC fighter interceptors. Others, in 
a training status, provided 'round- 
the-clock augmentation to units of 
the regular military establishment. 
When a TAC evacuation hospital 
arrived at one base, the local recov- 
ery group moved out of three of its 
four buildings to make room for the 
incoming unit, furnishing personnel 
to tear out partitions, install tele- 
phones, special lighting, and other- 



i 




wise assist the regular unit. The 
hospital became operational in a 
matter of hours. 

This voluntary and professional 
response by Air Force Reservists 
brought many expressions of praise 
from the recipients of the aid. Gen- 
eral Thomas S. Power, commander 
in chief of the Strategic Air Com- 
mand, in a letter to Lt. Gen. Ed- 
ward J. Timberlake, CONAC com- 
mander, praised the Recovery 
units as he said, "During the recent 
period of tension we found it nec- 
essary to disperse contingents of 
B-47 aircraft to several Reserve 
organizations. Reports received from 
these contingents and briefings re- 
ceived from the SAC staff who 
visited the installations indicate out- 
standing support is being rendered." 

The future of the Reserve Re- 
covery program has been termed 
promising. During the recent Mid- 



Winter Council of the Reserve Of- 
ficers Association, General Tim- 
berlake indicated that he wants full 
recognition of the Recovery units 
with complete and clear definition of 
all aspects of the Recovery mission. 
The General also urged that con- 
tinued efforts be made to remove 
limitations, to lift manpower ceil- 
ings, to establish the Recovery units 
as Category A with improved train- 
ing and pay status, and to man them 
in some degree with non-prior serv- 
ice personnel. 

Perhaps the most controversial 
issue affecting the program centers 
around budgetary matters — partic- 
ularly the pay of personnel. 

The controversy arose over the 
category designations of Reservists 
entering the Recovery program in 
FY '62. They were to be training 
category B, pay group B, which 
limited them to 24 paid drills and 
15 days of active duty for train- 
ing. It was felt that this decrease in 
the number of training periods 
would have several adverse effects. 
It implied less importance, priority, 
and urgency for the vital recovery 
and reconstitution missions. 

The Air Force is on record as 
strongly favoring 48 paid inactive 
duty drills and 15 days of active 
duty yearly as being the minimum 
training needed for Recovery units 
to achieve a realistic D-Day readi- 
ness capability. 

Funds available for the Recovery 
program during FY '63 are deemed 
insufficient to provide drill pay 
spaces for all participating Reserv- 
ists. This was an important fac- 
tor in the decision to discontinue Air 
Force Reserve's six Base Support 
Groups. The six test groups were 
deactivated December 31. 1962, 
and the 1,100 participating Reserv- 
ists were transferred out of the 
program and offered Part I posi- 
tions (with MoARS) in the same 
grade and pay status as they had 
in the test program. 

Also outlined by Gen. Timberlake 
as 1963 aims for Recovery units 
were a firm tie-in of all Recovery 
squadrons with plans of using com- 
mands, improved training with us- 
ing commands, improved equipping 
with the aid of using commands, 
and preparation for effective 1 5-day 
tours of active duty in conjunction 
with those commands. 

While there is much to be done 
in a program this new. Recovery Re- 
servists are confident the program 
can grow more and more into a solid 
contribution to the survivability of 
our Air Force in time of need. 



U EST IONS & 
j^NSWERS 



This column is designed to clarify problems of general 
interest to members of the Air Reserve Forces. Personal 
problems should be discussed with your unit personnel 
officer. Letters not used in the column cannot be answered. 



Why has a medical officer, lieutenant colonel Air 
Force since 1946, 30 years service, and Ready Status, 
eligible for promotion since 1953, not been pro- 
moted? Promotion to colonel is on a best qualified 
basis; both Reserve and active duty officers are considered 
at the same time to fill a quota established by Head- 
quarters USAF. This means that promotion is limited to 
a few, and many very fine officers are not promoted. 
Selection criteria is determined by the board members 
who vote by secret ballot. 

Prior to my retirement May 31, 1961 under Section 
8911, Title 10, U.S. Code, I was a fully qualified 
aircraft commander on a combat ready crew flying 
KC-97G aircraft. I have been advised that there 
are openings for experienced pilots in an Air Na- 
tional Guard organization manned with C-97G air- 
craft. Are there any circumstances under which I 
might qualify to fill a pilot vacancy with the Air 
National Guard or Air Force Reserve organizations? 
No, a member who is receiving retired pay may not be 
redesignated as a Ready Reservist unless the Secretary 
of the Air Force makes a special finding that the member's 
services in the Ready Reserve are indispensable. 

/ will have completed 2.0 satisfactory years service 
this month. I have elected Option 1 and 4, Retired 
Serviceman's Family Protection Plan. If I should 
die before my retirement starts at age 60, will 
my wife receive any benefits from the plan and, 
if so, when do they start? No. The survivors of a 
Reservist who has qualified for retired pay at age 60 
who dies before reaching that age are not eligible for 
benefits under that plan. Even though he has elected to 
participate in the plan, his participation does not com- 
mence until he starts to receive retired pay and deductions 
are made from pay for the annuity. Participation con- 
sists of receiving less retired pay to build up an annuity 
for his survivors, and only the survivors of participants 
arc eligible to receive benefits. It is an annuity, not a 
pension plan. 

Does the wording of paragraph 59e, AFM 35-7C, 
September 29, 1961, exclude Reserve warrant of- 
ficers, who otherwise qualify, from applying for 
retirement? No. Paragraph 59 applies to both com- 
missioned and warrant officers. Sub-paragraph 59c is in- 
tended to include warrant officers in the wording "com- 
missioned grade as a major or below." 



Is the Air National Guard losing its F-104 aircraft? 
If so, what aircraft will replace the F-104s in those 
squadrons? Yes, the Air Guard will relinquish its re- 
maining F-104s (two squadrons) to the Air Force by this j 
summer. Plans call for these units to get the F-102. 

Can a person who has been a member of the Air 
National Guard enlist under the new Try One pro- 
gram? Yes, and so can members of the Air Force Reserve. 

Is it possible for persons who possess acceptable ACB 
(Airman Classification Battery) and AQE (Airman 
Qualifying Examination) scores to enlist without re- 
testing? Yes, if their scores can be verified on DD Form 
214 or from other official documents. 




qOSPACE 
IBRARY 



Robert Goddard, Space Pioneer, Anne Perkins DeweyJ 
(Little, Brown, $3.50). The biography of the man who 
nearly 40 years ago built and fired the first liquid-fuel 
rocket, paving the way for the scientists of today. God- 
dardVscrupulous attention to detail, plain hard work, and 
the frustration which later came, tell a compelling storjl 
of a man who lived ahead of his time. 

The War In The Air, Maj. Gene Gurney, USAF (Crown, I 

$7.50). A pictorial history of all the combat air forces \ 
in World War II. 1500 photographs, sketches and dia-1 
grams illustrate the contribution of air power to victory.l 

Skyhooks, Kurt R. Stehling and William Beller (Double-J 
day, $4.95). In the 180 years since the Montgolfier 
brothers launched their balloon over Paris, aeronauts have! 
flown, or attempted to fly, in the interest of science or sport.J 
This history documents the successes as well as the failures.! 

What Colonel Glenn Did All Day, Robert W. Hill (Johnj 
Day, $2.50). A pictorial account, with brief text, of what 
John Glenn did the day he became the first American to| 
orbit the earth. 

Ace In The Hole, Roy Neal (Doubleday, $3.95). ThJ 
dramatic story of the Minuteman missile, told simply bui 
comprehensively and its contribution to our deterrent force! 
The major role this missile will play in our defense system 
is analyzed against over-all problems faced by modern 
defense planners. 

Changing Patterns of Military Politics, edited by Sam- 
uel P. Huntington (Crowell-Collier, Free Press, $7.50). 
A series of scholarly studies which explore an important 
problem — the function of violence in the quest for surw 
vival and the new roles of the military in politics. 



10 



Air Force Reservists and CAP members have similar national emergency missions. 
Accomplishing these demand time from private pursuits. 
Effectiveness rests on their zeal and ability. 



Civil 

Air 
Patrol 
News 



embers of the Air Reserve 
s must be kept in a state of 
less along with their profession- 
vice counterparts, 
serve units are availing them- 

of assistance from their civilian 
;rs, Civil Air Patrol, which also 
lues its state of readiness, 
tether he be a Reservist earning 
; toward retirement, or the 
r without prospect of monetary 
or retirement with pay at any 
is of little consequence today, 
is a common denominator: 
must be as prepared to help as 
nanly possible should a national 
>ency arise. 

mt steps toward this goal have 
taken. One of these is the Air 
Reserve Recovery Program. 
>ervists and CAP have joined 
; in the Recovery program and 

most recent address to a CAP 
ice, CONAC chief, Lt. Gen. 
rd J. Timberlake has spelled 
le vital role CAP must play in 
lission: courier and light trans- 
:ion missions; reconnaissance 

damage assessment; medical 
ation, and radiological moni- 
; and communications missions 

among them. 



Throughout the country, interest 
in the Recovery Program is advanc- 
ing in tempo as CAP units join Air 
Reservists in training programs. One 
of the largest recent shows was when 
Valley Forge Group 90 of CAP's 
Pennsylvania Wing trained with the 
9208th Air Reserve Recovery Squad- 
ron at Fort Mifflin, Pa. Nine CAP 
squadrons were represented by 75 
seniors and cadets in the field with 
the Reservists. 

The pattern of detection and de- 
contamination of atomic radiation, 
communications, casualty evalua- 
tion, traffic control, and general ad- 
ministration was dovetailed by the 
CAP and Air Reservists in extensive, 
repeated simulated alerts for nearly 
two weeks. 

It was as General Timberlake em- 
phasized when he first announced the 
new CAP role that "CAP's coopera- 
tion during tests and exercises is 
equally imperative if the training is to 
be meaningful and effective." 

This cooperation is widespread 
now — and growing. It is part of the 
dual emergency effort that CAP 
must play just like the many-faceted 
jobs Air Reservists have to perform. 

Civil Air Patrol's second emer- 
gency slot — closely related to the re- 
covery program in many ways — is 
with state Civil Defense agencies. It 
was announced only recently that 50 



of the 52 CAP wings have written 
Civil Defense agreements with their 
states (including District of Colum- 
bia and Puerto Rico) and many have 
already explored the finer points of 
cooperation with one another. Only 
two wings remain to execute formal 
agreements, but under present CAP- 
CD working conditions in those 
wings, a written agreement would be 
"desired but not absolutely neces- 
sary," a CAP headquarters officer 
said. These wings have been working 
together for years with CD. 

There are "compelling require- 
ments," as the CONAC commander 
put it, that exist whereby CAP and 
the Reservists are meshed. Surface 
transportation, as well as air, and the 
vitality of an internal communications 
system were listed among the prime 
needs. With its network of more than 
14,000 small radio stations and about 
half of its fixed stations equipped 
with emergency power, 80 percent 
of CAP's communications system — 
including the mobile and aircraft 
units — would be unaffected by com- 
mercial power failure. 

With the recent upswing in Civil 
Air Patrol membership to more than 
76,000, of which 42,000 are eager 
cadets, an inseparable team of civilian 
airmen and their auxiliary volunteers 
is developing into a potent power on 
the home front of the U. S. 












Civil Air Patrol and Civil Defense cooperation is demonstrated as 1st Lt. 
Don Clarahan and Cadet Dan Dye of CAP's Iowa Wing, use CD equipment to 
check ruins for radiological residue during Des Moines effectiveness test. 



11 



AIR RESERVE FORCES POLICY COMMITTEE 

ANG W" 








V 




M/G Charles DuBois 
Chairman 



Col. Charles Bock 
Executive Secretary 



M/G Roy Sessums 
Vice Chairman 






«**«■*»•* 



B/G Joseph Foss B/G Donald Strait 






- 



B/G John Campbell B/G Edward Fry 



B/G Rollin Moore Jr. B/G William Price 





Col. Joseph Barron B/G Charles Heidingsfelder 




B/G Robert Campbell 



Col. Walter Dalton 



ALTERNATES 






M/G Albert Clan 




M/G Robert FrWm 




M/G Henry Thorni 




m 



M/G James McGih 




B/G Jamie Gougi 



Col Philip P.cleer B/G Gordon DoolittU 



B/G George Wilson Col. Clinton Moyer 



Each policy affecting Reserve Forces is prepared by 
a committee formally established by Title 10, U.S.C. 



A Voice 
in Policy 



mer Under Secretary of the Air Force, Dr. 
>h V. Charyk, has described the active Air Force, 
Vir National Guard and the Air Force Reserve as 
;, ". . . essential legs in a tripod that represents our 
capability." Further, Dr. Charyk stressed the im- 
ince of producing ". . . the strongest line in marriage 
;en these three elements," recommending ". . . fre- 
t occasion for close relationship between members 
these three elements of our capability." 
The Air Reserve Forces Policy Committee 
FPC) is a three-in-one type committee which typi- 
his "close relationship." Title 10 of the U.S. Code 
8033) authorizes an Air National Guard and an 
•brce Reserve Policy Committee. However, in keep- 
vith the Air Force concept of "total force," they 
been meeting as one group, the ARFPC. 
The mission of this committee is to advise the Sec- 
/ of the Air Force on Reserve Forces policy mat- 
ind to assist in the preparation and development of 
ies and regulations pertinent to the organization, 
bution and training of the Air Reserve Forces. 
The integrated composition of the committee en- 
iges recommendations which incorporate the knowl- 
and experience of officers of the Reserve Forces as 
as those of the active establishment. 
Speaking before the 35th meeting of the Air Re- 
Forces Policy Committee last October, Secretary 
e Air Force Eugene M. Zuckert stated, "There is 
mger doubt in any thinking person's mind that our 
rve Forces are an important element of our strength. 
3w that your deliberations will be of the greatest 
to us; and I look forward, as I have consistently done 
e past, to receiving your recommendations." 
The Reserve Forces Policy Committee is comprised 
8 members, with equal representation from each 
»onent — six members from the regular Air Force, 
"om the Air National Guard and six from the Air 
i Reserve. There are two alternates each from the 
National Guard and the Air Force Reserve plus an 
late for each regular Air Force member. Alternates 
only in the absence of a member from their com- 
nt and when authorized by the chairman. 
Organizationally, the senior Reserve component 
ber of the committee serves as chairman, and the 
•r member of the other component serves as vice 
man of the Air Reserve Forces Policy Committee, 
resent the Chairman of the ARFPC is Maj. Gen. 
Ies H. DuBois (Mo. ANG) and the Vice Chairman 
ij. Gen. Roy T. Sessums (AFRes). 
Administrative support for the committee is pro- 
1 by the executive secretary, a Reserve Forces offi- 
>n active duty under Section 8033, Title 10, USC. 
Charles F. Bock, who presently occupies this posi- 



tion, also is responsible for keeping committee members 
informed of significant Reserve matters between sched- 
uled meetings. In addition, he is the ARFPC's liaison 
with ci/ilian organizations which are interested in the Air 
Reserve Forces as well as with the Air Staff and other 
military groups such as the Reserve Forces Policy Board, 
OSD, (see Jan. '63 issue of The AIR RESERVIST). 

Items for consideration by the committee come 
from several sources: members of the committee, the 
Air Staff, the major air commands and their policy 
committees, individual members of the Reserve Forces, 
the National Guard Bureau, and civilian organizations 
interested in the Air Reserve Forces such as AFA, ROA, 
NGA, Normally, before a committee meeting, the chair- 
man will convene an agenda committee to review all items 
submitted and to select those of sufficient importance for 
consideration by the full committee. Items not selected 
for ARFPC consideration are returned to the originator 
with appropriate comments. 

Before the ARFPC meets, items selected by the agen- 
da committee are forwarded to Air Staff offices of pri- 
mary interest for preparation of background material and 
for comments. The ARFPC then considers each agenda 
item on the basis of all information available and also 
calls on the Air Staff for briefings and expert advisors to 
help determine solutions for the problems under study. 
The committee's recommendations are determined by a 
majority vote provided that an equal number of members 
from each component (at least four each from the Reg- 
ular Air Force, the Air National Guard, and the Air 
Force Reserve) are present. 

The committee's comments and recommendations 
are forwarded to the Secretary of the Air Force through 
the Chief of Staff, along with the Air Staff comments on 
each recommendation. After reviewing the report of the 
committee, the Secretary normally approves or disap- 
proves each recommendation on its merits. If a recom- 
mendation is approved, it becomes Air Force policy and 
is returned to the Chief of Staff for implementation. 
(This may involve a simple change to an Air Force di- 
rective or preparation of additional proposals for changes 
in Department of Defense policy — or, even for new legis- 
lation). In certain cases, the Secretary defers a decision 
until additional information is available. In other cases, 
if he finds that a recommendation is good in principle 
but its implementation is not feasible, he may direct 
special action by the Chief of Staff to resolve the problem. 

Implementation of Reserve Forces policy is moni- 
tored by the Assistant Chief of Staff for Reserve Forces. 
Again, in keeping with "Total Force" concept, the actual 
mechanics of implementing approved recommendations 
are accomplished by the Air Staff agencies responsible 
for similar active establishment functions. 




13 



scanning 



from page 7 



create a strong, favorable image of 
the U. S. and its Air Reserve Forces. 



type training. Such a mission would 
afford the crew experience along Mil- 
itary A i r Transportation Service 
air routes in unfamiliar areas of South 
America. Throughout the seven-day 
trip, some 50 air hours gave the C-97 
crew first hand experience in navigat- 
ing over Caribbean waters, as well as 
foreign clearance procedures and 
proper diplomatic conduct. 

The nine-member flight team flew 
the first leg of the flight nonstop to 
Charleston, S.C., a distance of 2,580 
miles, taking an elapsed time of nine 
hours. Two hours later they took off 
for Trinidad, British West Indies on 
the second leg of the trip, a distance 
of 2,000 miles with an elapsed time 
of seven hours, forty-five minutes. 
The third leg of the flight from Piarco 
Airport in Trinidad to Recife, Brazil, 
was accomplished the next day. Elev- 
en hours later, after covering 2,360 
miles across the northeastern section 
of South America, the group arrived 
at Recife, where they remained over- 
night. The following day, January 2, 
a two-hour flight down the coast of 
Brazil brought the cargo from Recife 
to Salvador. Part of the cargo includ- 
ed a refrigerator, washing machine, 
two foot-operated sewing machines 
and an x-ray machine. 

Fridav morning, January 4, the Air 
National Guardsmen and their C-97 
left for the States with the course 
charted from Salvador to Recife . . . 
a brief stop . . . then on to San Juan, 
Puerto Rico, where customs clear- 
ance was conducted early upon ar- 
rival Saturday morning, January 5. 
A crew rest followed in San Juan with 
departure that night for Eglin AFB, 
Fla. The final leg, across the states 
brought touch-down at Van Nuys, 
Sunday, 1 :30 p.m., Pacific time, Jan- 
uary 6 . . . bringing to completion a 
most successful mission. 



On the same day that the California 
Guardsmen returned home, nine 
members of Puerto Rico's ANG, in 
the role of Kings of the Orient, ar- 
rived at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, with a 
plane load of toys donated by fellow 
Air Guardsmen. The toys were dis- 
tributed to boys of the Ecole Nation- 
ale des Arts et Metiers, girls of the 
Vincent Foundation, and to young, 
orphaned boys and girls of the Mai- 
son des Enfants at Petionville. The 
lives of 250 needy children were 
brightened by the visit. 

Humanitarian projects, such as 
these have many rewards and help to 



£VbTl! TMISaLLANIOUS j 



zation po. 'mmmmm 

sitions are available at Continental 
Air Command headquarters, Robins 
AFB, Ga. The positions range from 
airman first class to lieutenant colonel 
and include a variety of specialties. 

Officer vacancies include: procure- 
ment staff officer; administrative of- 
ficer; personnel officer; intelligence 
officer; legal officer; medical adminis- 
trative staff officer; sanitary and in- 
dustrial hygiene engineer (staff); 
medical officer (preventive medicine); 
internist; medical officer (special 
weapons defense); and administrative 
nurse. 

Enlisted positions are: intelligence 
operations technician; administrative 
specialist; administrative supervisor; 
lithographic offset pressmen; person- 
nel specialist; personnel technician; 
personnel superintendent; physical 
conditioning specialist; education and 
training technician; aeromedical tech- 
nician; medical administrative super- 
visor; medical administrative super- 
intendent, and medical material 
superintendent. 

Applicants must presently be mem- 
bers of the Air Force Reserve and 
must reside in an area not more than 
250 miles travel from CONAC head- 
quarters. Interested persons may con- 
tact CONAC for further details. 



In the Caribbean, the Puerto Rico 
ANG was also commended by the 
Antilles Defense Command for per- 
forming its assigned Air Defense func- 
tions in an outstanding manner dur- 
ing the Cuban crisis. Its personnel 
were cited for, "promptly and effi- 



ciently policing the newly establish* 
Air Detention and Identification Zoi 
— on air approaches to San Juan- 
with a minimum of personnel, ai 
craft and equipment. Throughout tl 
tense period, air defense readine 
for the Puerto Rico area was mail 
tained at a high level." 



Also cited recently was the 123 
Fighter Interceptor Squadron of tl 
Oregon ANG, which was award 
the coveted Outstanding Unit Awa 
— the Air Force's highest peacetir 
citation. It is the first time that tl 
award has been given to an AN 
unit not on active duty. The citatii 
accompanying the award stated 
part: "The 123rd Fighter Intercept 
Squadron, ANG, Portland Air C 
fense Sector, Air Defense Commar 
distinguished itself by exceptiona 
meritorious service from June 
1960 to April 30, 1962. During tl 
period, through a highly profession 
skilled and cohesive team dedicat 
to producing only the best, the 12: 
FISq., has created a public image 
its geographical area of responsibil 
which inspires calm confidence in I 
ability of our air defense forces 
protect the nation." 



MATS Eastern Transport Air Fo 
selected the 84th Air Terminal Squ; 
ron (Res), Donaldson AFB, S. C., 
its outstanding Reserve air termi 
squadron of 1962. The EAST 
evaluators found the motivation, ( 
cipline and morale of the 84th to 
the highest of the command's se^ 
Reserve air terminal squadrons d 
ing the past year. Commanded 
Maj. E. L. Walker, the Rese 
squadron is composed of person 
from the Greenville, S. C, area. 




Air National Guard gets new captain: U. S. Rep. Richard H. Ichord (Mo. 
sworn in at Pentagon by Maj. Gen. Winston P. Wilson, Deputy Chief, NC 



u 




O ommunism, which would destroy freedom and 
^j everything else our country stands for, has not lost 
i will to win. The Communist leaders will draw upon 
f of their resources, including subversion and propa- 
nda and science and technology, to achieve their 
signs. In performing its assigned specialty in support 

United States objectives, the U. S. Air Force will 
ntinue to develop and train forces to meet the threat. 
"Maintaining our Nation's supremacy in aerospace 
II demand a great effort from all of us in the Air 
>rce — active and Reserve. New aircraft, new missiles, 
w piloted and pilotless aerospacecraft and space sys- 
ns will be required in the years ahead. At the same 
ne, the great variety of potential uses of current Air 
>rce weapon systems must be recognized in meeting the 
reat of the many possible intensities and geographical 
;ations of conflict. The possible intensities range from 
Id war, through counterinsurgency operations and 
lited war, to general war. We must be capable of 
utralizing or destroying enemy forces wherever they 
allenge our freedom. The threat in 1963 must be 
?t with what we have to meet it today. All of us must 
irk now to increase the knowledge related to employ- 
? aircraft, missiles and aerospace and space vehicles 
it will be needed to meet the diversified aerospace 
'eats of J 964, 1968, 1973 and beyond. 

"You can be sure that the aerospace forces of the 
lure will contain piloted aircraft, aerospacecraft and 
ucecraft, as well as missiles and satellites — and men 
th your interests, skills and experience will be needed 

operate them." 

— Gen. Curtis E. LeMay, Chief of Staff 



iAR-RENDEZVOUS IN SPACE. Dr. Edward Welsh, 
ecutive secretary of the President's National Space 
mncil, told the National Rocket Club recently that the 
viets "are ahead in large operational rockets, in near- 
idezvous experience, and in many aspects of life sci- 
ces as applied to space." The U.S., however, is "now 
tting forth a greater magnitude of effort than they are 
d belatedly has recognized relative space competence 
a cornerstone of our country's future. We are gain- 

, . . . 

The British aerospace magazine, Interavia, editorial- 
d on this contest last October: 

"In dispassionate terms, the Soviet aim in the recent 
)stok 3 and Vostok 4 operations was to try out in prac- 
e the methods so far developed for contact between 
biting space vehicles, and Western military observers 
ess that the rendezvous technique . . . constitutes the 



key to the successful development of large space stations. 
These could be used to keep the entire earth under obser- 
vation and, if necessary, to clear the satellites and space 
vehicles of other countries from the sky. 

"Thus, astronautics has become a set part of Soviet 
policy, and it is hardly possible to separate the military 
and non-military aspects. This being so, the race for the 
Moon, which outwardly appears so peaceful, now shows 
up in an entirely different light ... In the struggle between 
East and West, which is taking place in front of the 
whole world, a 'Red Moon' would put the Western powers 
at a serious disadvantage at the very start of the military 
space race." 

MODERNIZING THE NATION'S AEROSPACE FORCE. 

When one considers the vast,range of possible intensities 
of conflict in various world situations of the future, the 
necessity of using various kinds of piloted aircraft and 
aerospacecraft in the decades ahead is inescapable. 

In the FY 1964 budget provision is made for sub- 
stantial additional numbers of advanced tactical fighters 
and new reconnaissance fighter aircraft; and an increase 
in the number of airlift aircraft including more all-jet 
transports. By the end of 1964 the U.S. will still have 
over 1,000 strategic bombers, many equipped with the 
Hound Dog air-to-surface missile. Increases are being 
made in numbers of Titan II and Minuteman missiles. 
Research and development is continuing on the Dyna- 
Soar aerospacecraft and on many other systems, piloted 
and pilotless. At the same time, the Atlas and Titan I 
missile programs are being completed in 1963, tanker 
aircraft procurement is being finished early in 1964, and 
the phase-out of the B-47 bomber force continued. 

Requirements are being visualized now at the high- 
est levels for various new kinds of aircraft and piloted 
aerospace vehicles that will be necessary in the years 
ahead. The fact that some kinds of aircraft in current 
use will eventually be replaced by other systems should 
not be surprising. Also to be expected in the constant 
modernization of the Nation's aerospace force are sub- 
stantial quantity and quality increases in some kinds of 
Air Force aircraft and missiles and decreases in quanti- 
ties of others. 

The Air Force, overall, must be constantly improved 
to provide the .Department of Defense and the Nation 
with the widest variety of those capabilities for which the 
Air Force is responsible and in which it long has special- 
ized — aerospace capability at any altitude. This will call 
for the kind of imagination, enthusiasm, open-minded- 
ness and planning and management ability that have 
marked Air Force growth from its earliest days. 



Major technological advances in military capabilities are always difficult, time-consuming and 
tstly. Decisions made today on military research and development will largely determine the 
nd of Air Force this country can have in years ahead." 

Lt. Gen. JAMES FERGUSON, DCS/Research and Development 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



USAF Recurrinjf Publication 30 
No. 30-H-3-63-315.633 



reserve camera 





A Clothing for Cuban refugees is loaded aboard a C- 
of the 941 st Troop Carrier Group, Paine Field, W, 
under the watchful eyes of MSgt. Jim Lacy. Some 7 
pounds of clothing was airlifted from Washington 1 
to Homestead AFB, Fla., by the Reservists. Discu: 
the flight with Mrs. Mildred Allen of King's Ga 
Mission Services, Seattle, are pilot Capt. Elmer h 
ardson and squadron navigator, Ma]. Warren Lai 
Q The 440th Troop Carrier Wing's supply organize 
was first to receive Continental Air Command's 
standing Base Supply Award." Lt. Gen. Edward J. I 
berlake, CON AC commander, presented the awar 
recently promoted Brig. Gen. Joseph J. Lingle, 4i 
TCWg., commander. The award was for base su, 
activities from Dec. 1, 1961 through Nov. 15, 1 
based on proficiency in 15 management areas. Q 
median Bob Hope and troop pose with Air Guard* 
of the 146th ATWg., during visit to Philippines, 
crews from the Van Nuys, Calif., wing flew Hope 
and his group which toured Far East during the C/j 
mas holidays. Standing (l-r): Amedee Chabot; A 
Turner; Les Brown; Janis Paige; Hope; Jerry Colo 
Anita Bryant and Peter Leeds. Front row: Capt. Wa l 
J. Mason; Capt. Robert I. Behar; Maj. Jerome N. 
berg; Capt. David J. Novic; MSgt. Robert E. D Ago. 
Capt. Donald L. Smith; TSgt. Richard A. Dawes 
Capt. Peter J. Lee, Jr., Q $42.00 Eye-saver. This 
wash fountain, installed in the battery shop of 
223rd Radio Relay Squadron, Arkansas ANG, in 
Springs, quickly proved its value when acid fro 
charging battery splashed into the eye of SSgt. W 
D. Smith. Smith immediately flooded the eye, dil\ 
the acid and reducing the burning effect. The fou< 
was assembled by squadron personnel. 



• 3-63-652491 



the air reservist 



OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE AIR RESERVE FORCES 




MAY 1963 




the air reservist 

Vol. XV— No. 4 May 1963 

AIR FORCE RESERVE 
AIR NATIONAL GUARO CIVIL AIR PATROL 



General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 



EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 



The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of HQ USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423. Boiling AFB, Washington 25, O.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq. USAF. 




Two phases of Air Force Reserve's Air 
Rescue minion are depicted in our 
split cover which shows an HU-16B in 
flight, and a para-rescue technician in 
training The men and equipment of 
the AF Reserve Rescue units are a force 
ready to augment the active duty Res- 
cue units of MATS. 



Openings . . . exercises 
fund drive . . . test programs . . . conclaves ' 

people . . . miscellaneo 



Scanning Air Reserve Forces News 




Poised for action at Elmendorf AFB, Alaska, are these C-119s 
of the 403rd TCWg., during 1963 Operation Timber Line. 



OPENINGS 



The De- 
partment of 
the Air 
Force has revised its criteria for se- 
lection of officers to serve as advisors 
on Air Force Reserve affairs under 
Section 8033 and 265, Title 10, U. S. 
Code. Priority will be given to Air 
Force Reserve officers not on active 
duty. Officers serving on active duty 
in career Reserve status will be se- 
lected only if there are no qualified 
non-active duty applicants. 

In the past, non-active duty Air 
Force Reserve officers were recalled 
for such positions only when qual- 
ified career Reserve officers were not 
available. Air National Guard officers 
for similar positions will continue to 
be selected from those not on extend- 
ed active duty in career status. 

There are 1 3 Air Force Reserve 
Section 8033 positions authorized, 
all in Headquarters USAF. There 
are 25 Air Force Reserve Section 
265 positions, two of which are at 
Headquarters USAF and the remain- 
der at the headquarters of major com- 
mands and sub-commands. Eight of 
the "8033" positions and 12 of the 
"265" positions will be filled during 
1963 and 1964. 

Officers interested in applying for 



tours of active duty as Air Forct 
serve advisors may apply thi 
command channels to the Direct 
Military Personnel, Headqua 
USAF, Washington 25, D. C, i 
cordance with AFR 45-22. Alth 
area assignment preference ma 
indicated on the application, al 
plicants will be considered for 
vacancy that occurs. 

Selections will be limited to h 
competent volunteer Air Force 
serve officers whose qualification 
experience meet the requiremen 
the office or major command in \ 
the vacancy exists. The tour of 
is four years, after which the o 
normally will revert to inactive 

Positions programmed to be 
during 1963 and 1964 are as fol 
(Section 8033, at Hqs., USAF) 
(1) 141X, 143X, 0036, or 0316; 
(1) 28XX, 55XX or 0036; Col| 
0216 or 79XX; Col., (2) 0076, 
or 0026; Col. (1) 0016 or 11 
Lt. Col. (1) 80XX, and Lt. Co 
73XX, 0026 or 0016. (Section 
at Hqs. USAF and major comm; 
Col. (1) 63XX; Col. (1) 27XX; 
(3) 0016, 0026 or 73XX; Coll 
111; Lt. Col. (3) 73XX, 001 
0026; Lt. Col. (1) 31XX, 2(j 
27XX or 28XX, and Lt. Col. (1) 



TIMBER LINE j ^ j£ J 

8M«mm«> Air Force 

jservists of the 403rd Troop Car- 
:r Wing who took part in this year's 
askan Command field exercise, 
'imber Line," will remember it for 
me time. 

They were captured by "enemy" 
>ops and forced to spend an un- 
mfortable 24 hours as prisoners. 
The Michigan men were among 

Reservists of the 403rd who par- 
ipated in the arctic exercise while 
; two weeks active duty last Feb- 
ary. They were from the 63rd 
oop Carrier Squadron, Detroit 
ea; 64th TCSq., Chicago area and 
E 65th TCSq., of Muskogee, Okla. 
The Reserve contingent, led by 
)1. Gari F. King, 403rd TCWg., 
mmander, formed part of a Tactical 
r Command strike force support- 

1 both sides of the joint Army-Air 
>rce maneuver. 

The unlucky seven were captured 
ter being ordered to take their 
119 into an airfield to pick up 
rgo. Unknown to them at the time, 
sy had been "set up" for capture 
their wing commander. Taken 
isoner were: Lt. Col. George L. 
ttle, commander of the 63rd TCSq.; 
aj. James S. Brown; Captains' Ber- 
rd V. Kobylik, Dwayne L. Miller, 
ephen J. Korfchok and Duane A. 
jnklee. Also crew chief, SSgt. Den- 
s C. Gill. 

The prisoners were treated realis- 
:ally. They were stripped, searched, 
lotographed and lodged in dirt- 
iored tents under guard. 
Throughout the night they were 
lied out individually for question- 
g by a Russian-speaking interro- 
tor who attempted to prod intelli- 
nce information from them. The 
lestions asked were loaded. Lt. Col. 
:roy Felton, 403rd operations offi- 
r had previously supplied the ene- 
y with statistics concerning the men 
id their families. 

While prisoners, they were given 
od that had been dyed green and 
her colors to make it look moldy 
id unpalatable. This was served 
>ating in warm water in paper plates 

tin cans. They had to eat with 
eir fingers. 
The seven were allowed to return 

their outfit after 24 hours. Army 
x>ps operating the prisoner of war 
mp where they were held, had high 
aise for their conduct. 
The 403rd Wing sent 70 men from 
e Detroit area, and 40 each from 
tiicago and Muskogee, to take part 



in the Alaskan exercise. Other mem- 
bers of the Reserve Wing remained 
at home stations for the two week 
active duty tour. 

The 3,000 mile trip to Elmendorf 
AFB, Alaska, took the Reservists 
through Rapid City, S. D.; Edmon- 
ton, Alberta, Canada; Whitehorse, 
Yukon Territory and finally to El- 
mendorf AFB, on the outskirts of 
Anchorage, from which they operated 
during their Alaskan tour. They spent 
a night at each spot along the way. 
The Whitehorse stop was unsched- 
uled. Bad weather forced the Re- 
servists to spend the night in the small 
capital of Canada's Yukon Territory. 
There were no hotel facilities large 
enough to take care of the men so 
they were billeted comfortably in a 
local gymnasium for the night. 

Bad weather ruled out much of 
the tactical air support scheduled dur- 
ing the Reservists' Alaskan tour. They 
demonstrated their capability, how- 
ever, by completing a key tactical air 
drop in which they put 72 Canadian 
troopers of the Princess Patricia reg- 
iment and some heavy equipment, on 
target. A second troop drop was called 
off after three successive days of 
high winds over the drop area made 
it hazardous for the airborne troops. 



FUND DRIVE 



The Fal- 
| con Foun- 
dation, an 
organization devoted to providing 
preparatory scholarships to young 
men seeking admission to the United 
States Air Force Academy will con- 
duct its educational program fund 
drive in June. 

The goal for this year's drive is 
$250,000. An appeal to voluntarily 
support this campaign is going out 
to all active duty Air Force military 
and civilian personnel, Reserve, Na- 
tional Guard and retired. 

Money collected during the drive 



will go towards scholarships. The ulti- 
mate goal of the Foundation is to 
award forty $1,000 scholarships an- 
nually to deserving young men. 

Secretary of the Air Force Eugene 
M. Zuckert said in a letter to all Air 
Force personnel: 

". . . The Falcon Foundation pro- 
vides scholarships and other assist- 
ance to outstanding young men who 
aspire to attend the Academy and 
follow Air Force careers, but who 
require preparatory schooling to meet 
high standards for Academy entrance. 
It is a worthwhile program." 

Commenting on the drive, Air 
Force Chief of Staff, Gen. Curtis E. 
LeMay, added: "The Air Force of 
the future will be only as effective 
as its leaders. One of our essential 
tasks in perpetuating organizational 
effectiveness must, therefore, be to 
assure that the Air Force Academy 
continues to receive the best possible 
candidates and produces high qual- 
ity graduates. 

"The Falcon Foundation, a non- 
profit educational organization, for 
several years has conducted an out- 
standing program in support of this 
aim. In providing preparatory schol- 
arships to young men who exhibit out- 
standing leadership qualities, but who 
need further academic preparation 
to meet the Academy's high entrance 
standards, the foundation has tapped 
a source of fine officers who might 
otherwise be overlooked." 

General LeMay cautioned that con- 
tributions should be on a truly volun- 
tary basis. 

Those personnel not able to par- 
ticipate in an organized base or unit 
collection for the drive may send 
their contribution direct. 

Checks or money orders should 
be made out to the Falcon Founda- 
tion and mailed to the Republic Na- 
tional Bank of Dallas, Attn: Mr. 
Charles F. Neislar, Trust Department, 
P. O. Box 241, Dallas 21, Tex. 




Vv The falcon, mascot of the U. S. 

""^fc Air Force Academy and symbol 
for the Falcon Foundation serves 
as a reminder that the Falcon 
fund drive begins June 1 5. Funds 
are used to provide preparatory 
scholarships to young men seek- 
ing admission to the academy 
and a career in the USAF. 



Scanning Air Reserve Forces News 




View received by Brig. Gen. E. J. Haseltine, meeting with 
Reserve Staff during take-over of 1st Region operations. 



TAKE OVER 



"Why 
| don't we let 
the Reserv- 
ists run the shop while we're gone?" 

The question was posed by Brig. 
Gen. Benjamin G. Willis, and the 
"shop" referred to was the First Air 
Force Reserve Region headquarters 
at Stewart AFB, N. Y. The reason 
for the General's question — which in 
reality was more of a decision — 
stemmed from his desire to make an 
orientation visit to each of Conti- 
nental Air Command's five other re- 
gion headquarters and to have his 
staff of active duty Air Force officers 
accompany him. It was a 15-day trip. 

A little more than three years 
ago the Secretary of the Air Force 
approved a major revision to the 
organizational structure and future 
use of the Air Reserve Forces. One of 
the principal policy factors incorpor- 
ated in this revision, entitled Plan for 
Revised Management of the Air Re- 
serve Forces, called for a more tang- 
ible program of using qualified inac- 
tive duty Reservists in the manage- 
ment of subordinate Reserve elements. 

More than a score of the First 
Region's key Reserve staff officers 
involved in the "take-over" accepted 
the challenging proposal without hesi- 
tation. Reservist, Brig. Gen. Edward 
J. Haseltine, General Willis' counter- 
part, and the man upon whom would 
rest the responsibility for the man- 
agement of the First Region, ex- 
pressed his unequivocal indorsement 
of the plan. 

The complexities of the "take 
over" are best recognized when we 



realize that from the Stewart AFB 
headquarters, 40 Active duty and 60 
Air Force Reserve personnel direct 
every phase of the Ready Reserve 
program for 140 subordinate units 
within an eight-state area. Although 
geographically the smallest of CO- 
NAC's six Regions, the First is the 
largest in population. There are 
more than 4,000 Reserve officers and 
nearly 6,000 airmen assigned to sub- 
ordinate units. 

Some of the subordinate units are 
two troop carrier wings and their 
squadrons, an aerial port squadron, 
a casualty staging squadron, two 
field hospitals, three air terminal 
squadrons, and 13 recovery groups 
and 24 recovery squadrons. 

After about a three-hour overlap 
period during which both groups of 
officers were on board, the Reserv- 
ists picked up the functions without 
a break in stride. No special projects 
were created for the period, and 
every effort was made to give the 
Reservists an opportunity to perform 
the normal routine functions note- 
worthy items, among which, were: 
they planned for the forthcoming 
summer Recovery competition staged 
by First Region's 24 Recovery squad- 
rons; they expanded the Region liai- 
son with the 26th Air Division (ADC) 
in arranging sites for Recovery unit 
summer encampments; they rewrote 
several regulations; they prepared and 
edited the Region Digest and Region 
News Letter for the month of March, 
and they drafted and had disseminated 
recruiting materials. Also, and per- 
haps the most outstanding, was the 



review and submission of '64 65 
nancial Plan, including a revie\ 
the budget submissions of sutx 
nate units. 

Each of the Reserve officers 
ticipating in the take-over regu 
performs an annual tour of a< 
duty, but this was the first time 
worked together as a manager 
team. General Willis stressed 
fact that he did not consider th 
training period in the ordinary st 
rather, he described it as an ac 
command-management operation 

Upon his return to Stewart A 
at the end of the 15 -day take 
period, General Willis complime 
the Reserve officers for the exce 
manner in which they carried ou 
mission of the First Region, anc 
tributed their success to indivi 
dedication as well as the First Re 
policy of a quarterly work wee! 
coupled with week-day work as 
ments for the Reservists during 
two intervening months. 

According to First Region < 
mander these factors, ". . . i 
them an integral part of our r 
quarters and gave them the know] 
that they can conduct the oper 
of a region on their own." 



ANG CONCLAVE 



M ; 
Gen. 
m - tis R. 
assistant chief of staff for Re 
Forces, spoke at a meeting ol 
Adjutants General Associatioi 
the U. S. at San Juan, Puerto 
on April 22. 

The General pointed out tha 
professional competence display* 
Air Reserve Forces units durin 
Berlin contingency and the no-r 
response by Air Force Res< 
troop carrier and aerial port 
during the Cuban crisis, have be 
the standard of performance. 

"But, such performance c; 
with it an automatic challeng 
equal and surpass itself," the Ge 
cautioned those present. "Sine* 
Air Reserve Forces have now pi 
themselves, their readiness and 
fessionalism become factors in f 
planning. It is therefore mand 
that this high degree of reac 
be maintained." 

He warned the conferees, how 
". . . this excellence in perforn 
is in danger today because o: 
ficiencies in manning." 

He said he knows that the pre 
does not result from a lack of 
otism, but from a lack of u 
standing of the nation-wide ur; 



the need for really ready reserve 
ces. He added, "we have become 
used to security that it is difficult 

some people to realize how close 

enemy is. 
•'We must create a general spirit 
patriotic urgency — a climate which 
lecessary to a vigorous and effec- 
: Reserve program." 



TEST PROGRAM I 






Our Air 
Force Re- 
serve must 
intain management efficiency in 
npower and money. More prac- 
il utilization of Part III Reservists 
horized Recovery unit command- 
by Continental Air Command, last 
vember, is aligned with this goal, 
is a step — predicated upon return 
dollar investment — in the train- 
of these Reservists, 
rhe Recovery unit commanders 
e been delegated authority to per- 
: the Reservists to train with Re- 
vt and Active duty units, or as 
lP instructors. The trainees receive 
nts, but no pay. This type of train- 
is considered more beneficial than 
>sroom sessions under the "little 
schoolhouse , ' concept. 
Dne of the first to implement the 
n was Col. John S. Hoffman, 
^5th Air Force Reserve Recovery 
3up commander, in Washington, 
C. He established an experimental 
•gram using Part III personnel of 
2493rd Air Reserve Sector. 
\ssisting Colonel Hoffman were 
I. Harry Bishop, 2493rd Air Re- 
ve Sector commander and Maj. 
:rman S. Reed, director of Reserve 
sonnel, Headquarters Command, 
AF, both of Boiling AFB, D. C. 
Selected volunteers perform actual 
ision functions within the active 
iblishment instead of attending the 
ial two-hour classroom sessions. 
; duty periods are scheduled for 
same night of the week that the 
>ervists would attend class, 
sponsors of the experiment feel 
t the Air Force is realizing a bet- 
return on its investment in the 
t III program. During the first 
> weeks of the program the com- 
nd gained 96 additional manhours 
10 additional cost. 

Vlajor Reed cited as one example 
invaluable assistance rendered by 
iervists with comptroller and fi- 
ice type AFSCs. A number of 
m helped in preparing several 
usand W-2 tax forms issued by 
Command. Not only did they 
>edite mailing, but due to experi- 



ence gained in affiliated occupations, 
were able to suggest shortcuts that 
resulted in savings. 

Although the Reservists have been 
given other jobs, the major share of 
their training thus far has been con- 
fined to administrative work. 

Overall reaction to the Washing- 
ton experiment has been excellent. 

Members of the active establish- 
ment are in favor of the program and 
like the work of the Reservists. 

Headquarters Command recently 
conducted a survey among participat- 
ing Reservists. The trainees were in 
favor of the program. 

One man wrote that working with 
the actual operation of Boiling AFB, 
"gives all of us a renewed feeling of 
belonging once more to the day-by- 
day life of the Air Force." 

Another stated that he considered 
the program an excellent method of 
utilizing Reservists to assist the Reg- 
ular components, adding, "I person- 
ally feel I'm accomplishing more with 
this type of assignment than in the 
programmed classroom instruction." 

All expressed the desire that the 
program be continued. 

The present experiment will end 
June 30. At that time it will be 
evaluated with a view toward en- 
larging the program and recommend- 
ing its implementation throughout the 
Air Force Reserve. 



G 



iol. Starr Smith, whose M-Day as- 
signment is with the Air University's 
office of information, contributed the 
following article on the Senior Officer 
Orientation Course. • • • 



SENIOR OFFICERS 



Since its 
beginning 
in 19 5 6, 
approximately 200 officers have at- 
tended the five-day Air Reserve 
Forces Senior Officers Orientation 
Course. This course is given every 
spring by the Air University's Air 
War College at Maxwell AFB, Ala. 
The last class was held March 4-8. 
When and if a national emergency 
comes — these are the men who will 
lead the civilian components on to 
active duty with the Air Force. 

It is in preparation for this even- 
tuality that the course is held. Mil- 
itary strategy is the essence of the 
material presented. The Reservists are 
integrated into the regular War Col- 
lege classes for the morning sessions. 

see NEXT page 




TV producer Don Fedderson of "My Three 
Sons" is cited by Lt. Gen. Timberlake of 
CON AC for publicity given AF Reserve. 




1st Region Commander 
(c), is met by Reserve c 
E. Haseltine after 15-d 



V 




Rice mill, gift from people of Taiwan to 
Dominican Republic, is loaded aboard 
ANG C-97 at Travis AFB, California. 




SENIOR OFFICERS, from page 5 

In the afternoons they meet as a sep- 
arate group and study subjects se- 
lected especially for them, which in- 
cludes discussions of Air Force plans, 
programs and problems. They also 
take part in War College seminars, 
with two or three Reservists assigned 
to each seminar. 

Lt. Col. Eugene A. Lohman, Jr., 
War College project officer for the 
course, pointed out that the subject 
matter, much of it Top Secret, under- 
goes constant re-evaluation. "The 
world situation lectures, the com- 
mand briefings, such as SAC, 
NORAD and TAC are always given, 
but now our students want to know 
about counterinsurgency, space, the 
Strike Command and things like that." 

Reservists are chosen for the course 
by Headquarters USAF. Forty offi- 
cers attended the last class — 25 
AFRes and 15 ANG. 

In 1961, the alternate plan was 
initiated — all generals in one class 
and colonels occupying general slots 
in the next. This did not hold true 
in the 1963 class. 

Maj. Gen. Robert Taylor, III, Air 
War College commander and his staff 
know, of course, that only the high 
spots can be touched during the five- 
day period. But he thinks the course 
is a splendid idea. He says, "This is 
a tremendous experience for us at 
the Air War College and for the in- 
dividual Reservist. The exchange of 
ideas and information is beneficial to 
all concerned." 



PEOPLE ia ££ B w 

;:g jamin W. 

Lichty, air 

executive for the Air National Guard 
since 1960, has been named deputy 
to Brig. Gen. I. G. Brown, assistant 
chief, National Guard Bureau for Air. 
His new assignment is in addition to 
his duties as air executive. A veteran 
pilot, the colonel soloed at 19, in St. 
Louis, Mo. While a young man he 
was employed by a St. Louis aircraft 
corporation as a flying instructor. 
Charles A. Lindbergh was chief pilot 
for the company. TSgt. Irvin H. Lee, 
Hq 2nd Air Force Reserve Region, 
Andrews AFB, Md., has been award- 
ed an Oak Leaf Cluster to the Air 
Force Commendation Medal. The 
award was for meritorious service as 
public information technician with 
Pacific Air Forces from Aug. 20, 
1960, to July 24, 1962. 

CMSgt. Michael C. Monroe, one 

of the youngest chief master sergeants 
in the Air Force is working in the 
National Guard Bureau's Manpower 
and Organization Branch at the Pen- 
tagon. He is the only airman ever as- 
signed to the Bureau. Sergeant Mon- 
roe entered the service in 1948. Col. 
Charles J. V. Murphy, Air Force Re- 
servist, recently received The Nether- 
lands "William the Silent" award for 
journalism. 

The award, consisting of a gold 
medal and one thousand dollars, is 
normally presented annually by the 
people of The Netherlands to the 
American newspaper or magazine 



writer who has excelled in report 
about their country or on Neth 
land-connected subjects. 

Colonel Murphy is a mobilizat 
assignee with the military person 
section of Hq USAF. 

Ben F. Dillingham, former co 
mander of the Civil Air Patrc 
Hawaii Wing, was recently presen 
an Air Force scroll of appreciati 

One of Hawaii's leading citize 
Dillingham was cited for his merit 
ious service as commander of 
Hawaii Wing from January 1948 
May 1962, when he retired as a C 
colonel. During his command, 
wing expanded from two origi 
squadrons to fourteen. Dillinghan 
credited with introducing aerosp 
education into the Hawaii high sch 
curriculum and also establisr 
CAP's first glider training progr. 
Maj. Gen. John B. Montgonn 
AFRes, president of the Air Fc 
Association, has been named mol 
zation assistant to the superintenc 
of the Air Force Academy, Maj. C 
Robert H. Warren. Montgome 
duties will include all phases of 
Academy's operation. 



MISCELLANEOUS j * i 

tiated by the Vermont Air Natk 
Guard at Burlington is saving doll 
A corrosion control and treatn 
project has been established 
F-89J aircraft. The planes are ] 
tially disassembled, stripped 
treated, including vacu-blasting, \ 
several coats of a new paint. Als< 
new method of application is 
ployed. It is estimated that more t 
$2.7 million are being saved thrc 
supervision by the ANG and the 
of a contract field team-governn 
facility combination as opposed 
contract facility type operation. 



The Continental Air Comman 
cooperation with MATS is under 
ing a strenuous program of pre-s» 
ration counseling for active < 
nurses returning to civilian life. I 
an active duty nurse who leaves 
service can at about 90 days pric 
separation, be earmarked for 
Force Reserve or Air Guard duty 
immediately step into a vacancy i 
her return to civilian life. The Res 
nurse program allows a sepan 
nurse to be used and to avail he 
of the professional and economic 
vantages in the program immedia 



^ir National Guard flying units in 
inesota and Maryland have earned 

A.F. plaque for flying safety, 
vfaj. Gen. D. W. McGowan, chief 
the National Guard Bureau, said 

179th Fighter-Interceptor Squad- 

of the Minnesota ANG, Duluth 
nicipal Airport, and the 175th 
:tical Fighter Group, Maryland 
G, Baltimore, were selected by 

Air Force's Directorate of Aero- 
ce Safety for the award on the 
is of their past year records, 
•or the first time, General Mc- 
jvan said, an ANG unit will re- 
^e a missile safety award. It is 

124th Fighter Group, Idaho ANG 

Boise, flying F-86L Sabrejets 
ipped with 2.75-inch aerial rock- 

The award is also for its safety 
3rd of the past year, 
■lone of the units selected had 
ned the honor previously, records 
tie National Guard Bureau — which 
; back to 1954 — indicate. 
Jnits are selected on the basis of 
sion, amount and type of flying 
formed, accident rate, improve - 
U in record, weather in its locality, 
rational hazards with which it 
A deal, pilot experience level, type 
aircraft, and other factors. 



"hree jet fighter pilots, two from 
isas and one from Ohio, are the 
Air National Guardsmen to at- 
1 paratroop jump school at Ft. 
ining, Ga., in connection with for- 
d air controller training, 
■brward air controllers parachute 
i combat with Army airborne 
>ps to direct air attacks against 
my ground forces from front line 
jnd positions. 



Two of the three — Maj. Ralph T. 
Buchanan and Capt. Jackie R. 
Youngblood, both of the 127th Tac- 
tical Fighter Squadron, Kansas ANG 
at Wichita — have completed forward 
air controller training and have re- 
ported for jump school. 

The other F-100C Supersabre jet 
pilot— Capt. John B. Hinkel of the 
166th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 
Ohio ANG, Columbus — reported to 
Eglin AFB, Fla., for forward air con- 
troller training in April. He is slated 
to attend jump school this month. 

Air Force forward air controllers 
began taking paratroop training many 
months ago, but this is the first time 
it has been open to Air National 
Guard fliers. 

To be a forward air controller, a 
man must be a fighter pilot with air- 
to-ground weapons experience. 

Major Buchanan is commander of 
the 127th Tactical Fighter Squadron. 
Youngblood has been a student at 
the University of Wichita and Hinkel 
earned his bachelor's degree in math- 
ematics this spring at Ohio State. 



Some F-100C and F-84F pilots, 
plus support personnel of the Ohio 
Air National Guard will operate brief- 
ly from Niagara Falls, N. Y., Mu- 
nicipal Airport during the 121st Tac- 
tical Fighter Wing's June 15-29 pe- 
riod of active duty for training. 

Although the purpose — aerial 
weapons training — isn't romantic, the 
month and location are. So wing offi- 
cials at Lockbourne Air Force Base 
say there is only one logical title: 
"Operation Honeymoon." 



A Promotion Board will convene 
at the Air Reserve Records Center 
June 4-5, to consider approximately 
300 first lieutenants, captains and 
majors for unit or mobilization as- 
signment vacancies. 

First lieutenants to be considered 
must have a promotion service date 
on or before April 30, 1961. Cap- 
tains and majors must have a PSD 
on or before April 30, 1959. 



Another Air National Guard weath- 
er flight joined the Military Air Trans- 
port Service's Air Weather Service on 
April 1 . This was the 1 1 0th Weather 
Flight of the Missouri ANG, located 
at Lambert Airport, St. Louis, Mo. 
They received their federal recogni- 
tion inspection by a Hq AWS team 
headed by Brig. Gen. Roy W. Nelson, 
on April 20. This unit becomes the 
194th organization of the ANG to 
join MATS as an M-Day unit. 



As an incentive to stimulate its pri- 
or service recruiting program, Air 
National Guard secured special au- 
thority to transport two top individual 
airmen recruiters from each state for 
the months February through June 
1963, to Hawaii or Puerto Rico. 
Transportation is by ANG C-97 in 
conjunction with Guard transport 
units regularly scheduled over-water 
training flights. Travel is performed 
at the individual's own expense or 
furnished from local non-federal fund 
sources. Each state selects its two top 
recruiters for the month. 

Normally the training flight lasts 
from seven to ten days, and the "va- 
cationing" recruiters are advised to 
return with the same aircraft. 




Closed circuit TV is explained by Lt. Col. Lohman 
o Brig. Gens. Smith (I) and Lingle (r), attending 
ecent Senior Officer Course at Air War College. 



Lt. Col. J. Campbell (r) 109th ATGp (NY -ANG), 
presents MATS flying safety awards (l-r) to MSgt. 
A. Burroughs, Capt. G. Gregory and MSgt. P. Allen. 




Reservists Augment MATS 



Air Rescue 



J_ he Air Rescue Service was born 
of necessity; the innumerable pilots 
and crewmen forced down behind 
enemy lines during World War II 
prompted the development of a con- 
sistent system of rescue. 

The logical answer came in the 
form of the Air Rescue Service, which 
was formally activated in 1946 and 
had as its primary mission the re- 
covery of downed combat airmen. 
However, in peace or war the men 
of Air Rescue Service fly wherever 
and whenever they are needed. At 
present, Air Rescue Service has its 
headquarters at Orlando AFB, Fla., 
and is an integral element of the 
MATS mission. 

Augmenting this Regular Air Force 
team of rescue specialists are five 
Air Force Reserve Air Rescue squad- 
rons, the first of which (the 301st) 
was activated in August 1956. Geo- 
graphically the Reserve squadrons 
are located at: 301st, Homestead 
AFB, Fla.; 302nd, Luke AFB, Ariz.; 
303rd, March AFB, Calif.; 304th, 
Portland IAP, Ore., and the 305th, 
Selfridge AFB, Mich. 

Each squadron has a manning 
structure which consists of 26 officers 
and 96 men. In addition MATS as- 
signs to each squadron one major 
and two master sergeants of the Reg- 
ular Air Force who are rescue special- 
ists and serve as advisors to the 
squadron commander. 

The Reserve's Air Rescue squad- 
rons use the HU-16B (formerly SA- 
I6B) Albatross in the accomplish- 
ment of their search and rescue 
commitments. This versatile, twin- 
engine, amphibious aircraft carries a 
crew of five and has cabin space 




which may be adapted for various 
missions. As an ambulance it can 
carry 12 litters. For transport work 
it carries 10 passengers plus crew. 

Part of the standard survival 
equipment carried aboard each air- 
craft is the MA-1 Kit. It is a com- 
plete survival kit containing such 
items as food, clothing, water distilla- 
tion equipment and first aid materials. 
The MA-1 Kit consists of three 
bundles and two automatically inflat- 
ing 20-man life rafts, plus a thousand 
feet of rope. 

Operationally, when participating 
in a joint rescue search, the first res- 
cue craft to reach the scene auto- 
matically becomes the "On Scene" 
commander. As such, that aircraft is 
responsible for guiding and directing 
the efforts of the other air and land 
forces engaged in the rescue. 

Air Rescue Reservists also per- 
formed a vital mission during the 1961 
Berlin contingency. Two crews from 
each of the five squadrons volunteered 
for 60-day tours of active duty and 
took up stations at strategic jumping- 
off points for the Air National Guard 
jet aircraft crossing the Atlantic 
Ocean. Similar survival safety meas- 
ures were afforded these aircraft on 
their return trip. 

In addition to their augmentation 
assignments during periods of stress, 
the Reserve Rescue squadrons main- 
tain a constant alert to render assist- 
ance in local emergencies. For the 
302nd, a training mission at Lake 
Mead, Ariz., turned into the real thing 
when two F-101 B Voodoo jet fighters 
collided near Needles, Calif., last De- 
cember. One of the fighters crash- 
landed in the desert, and the other 



made it to Luke AFB. The pilot M 

radar observer of the plane wfl 
crashed, ejected successfully and lal 
ed in the desert. The 302nd rejfl 
men conducted an immediate sea 
for the men, located them and direc 
ed a Marine helicopter to the arefl 
In another instance of ResH 
rescuemen responding to local eni 
gencies, members of the 301st w 
into action last February when! 
commercial jet airliner crashed! 
the Florida Everglades. The Boek 
720B airliner was on a Miami-il 
Chicago flight when the accident a 
curred, killing 43 persons. The 30W 
plane was flying alongside the Cfl 
Guard helicopter which located || 
crash site. They remained overB 
site, handling all the initial commuitl 
cations which brought ground rescK 
parties into the isolated, reptile infett 
ed swampland. 

Prominent members of this Reserv 
rescue organization are the courage- 
ous and highly trained specialai 
known as Para-rescuemen. The dufc 
of the Reserve para-rescuemen, a 
air crew members, during search at: 
rescue missions, are to reach the dis- 
tress scene when other means ■ 
impossible or too time consumk 
When necessary, they parachute in 
seek survivors, administer emergeno 
treatment and advanced first aid, pro 
vide for survival, and assist in}| 
evacuation of victims. In accomplish 
ing this, the para-rescuemen must a 
hibit a combination of skills.H 
must be a precision parachutist; a 
expert underwater swimmer (familia 
with the use of SCUBA— Self Con 
tained Underwater Breathing Appa 
ratus — equipment) ; a skilled mew 
and thoroughly practiced in surviw 
on various types of terrain. 




W&Y* 



'•'/.'■'■ ''''•■•''■'•"• vX- • 



ch of the five Air Rescue squad- 
is authorized eleven para-rescue- 
Recruiting para-rescuemen is a 
process. "Not because there 
: sufficient applicants," says Maj. 
us C. West, 301st commander, 
reason is that para-rescue train- 
extremely rough. The applicant 
o be tops physically and men- 
and capable of fast and accurate 
ons. Further, he must be avail- 
for the extensive training." 
alifications for para-rescuemen 
:>r the dual AFSCs of paratroop- 
d medical technician. Any ex- 
ry man (Army, Navy or Air 
:) who has held either AFSC is 
led to enlist in this program as 
>ervist. The man who has had 
hute training (government or 
iry) receives medical training in 
iced first aid. Conversely the 
with previous medical training 
)e given parachute training, 
th approval from Headquarters, 
nental Air Command, selected 
:ants with no prior military 
e may enter the Air Force Re- 
s para-rescue program and re- 
the necessary training to qualify 
>ara-rescue technician, 
sides the military "jump" school 
rt Benning, Ga., the U. S. For- 
ervice's "Smoke Jump" school 
Cave Junction, Ore., conducts 
ng which meets the standards 
sary for para-rescue qualifica- 
Last year both the 304th and 
i Air Rescue Squadrons used 
;overnment facility to train as- 
; applicants. Medical training is 
iplished at Gunter AFB, Ala. 
len Air Reserve para-rescuemen 
ot actually engaged in a search 
escue mission their time is spent 
ng for such emergencies. MSgt. 



Robert L. Seale, NCOIC of the para- 
rescue section of the 301st, believes 
that, ". . . the more land, water and 
tree jumps, equipment drops, swim- 
ming, medical treatment and evacua- 
tion methods he learns, the more ef- 
fective he will be when needed." 

Seale is an Air Reserve Technician, 
responsible for the training and super- 
vision of the Air Force Reservists 
who make up the 301st para-rescue 
team. As a member of ART, he per- 
forms essentially the same functions 
during the week (as a Civil Service 
employee) that he does while in uni- 
form during unit training assemblies. 

Training for the para-rescue tech- 
nicians of the 301st comes from ac- 
tual participation with Regular Air 
Force Rescue Service organizations. 
Weekend training periods are spent 
at Homestead AFB, Fla., and at other 
bases in the U. S. At Stead AFB, 
Nev., they underwent the basic 
course in desert survival, and at 
Kincheloe AFB, Mich., they learned 
the principles of arctic survival. The 
relatively nearby Florida Everglades 
also serve as a site for their training. 

During 1962 all five Reserve Air 
Rescue Squadrons were accident free. 
For a similar accident-free year in 
1958 the 301st received the MATS 
Safety Award, the first time the 
award went to a Reserve Air Rescue 
squadron. The 301st received the 
award again in 1960 and 1961. 

Although a mere handful of men 
when compared to the overall num- 
ber of Air Reservists, these members 
of the Reserve Air Rescue squadrons 
have earned a solid reputation for 
professionalism and dedication to 
duty. They represent a ready force, 
trained and capable of adding vital 
equipment and "know how" to that 



of the MATS Rescue team in fur- 
therance of the Rescue motto, "That 
Others May Live." 

The high degree of professionalism 
achieved by the officers and men of 
the Reserve Air Rescue squadrons 
was epitomized when the Air Force 
called upon Maj. Curtis Fallgren to 
become the first Reservist sent over- 
seas to instruct Thai pilots. 

This unusual phase of the Air Res- 
cue mission came to light recently in 
an article submitted to The AIR 
RESERVIST magazine by well 
known aviation writer and author, Lt. 
Col. Leverett G. Richards, AF-Res. 
Colonel Richards currently holds an 
M-Day assignment with the Magazine 
and Book Branch of Air Force's Of- 
fice of Information. 

Major Fallgren is a member of the 
304th Air Rescue Squadron (Res.) 
at Portland, Oregon's International 
Airport. He went to Bangkok last 
September for 89 days to instruct the 
members of the new Royal Thailand 
Navy's air arm. There, he and one 
Regular Air Force pilot had six Thai- 
land pilots to check out in the two 
HU-16's, acquired from the U.S. 

Two more of the planes are pro- 
grammed in 1963 and two in 1964, 
to form the nucleus of the RTAF. 
They will be used for coast and sea 
patrol, and for support of ground 
troops inland. 

"Thailanders are a proud, self- 
sufficient, freedom-loving people with 
a good standard of living. There is no 
room for Communism there," said 
Major Fallgren, "and their pilots are 
eager, alert and hard-working." 

Major Fallgren flew more than 100 
hours in the 89 days, and made 140 
water landings while checking the 

see NEXT page 




O Downed "victim" in raft sets off 
smoke signal as he awaits help 
from fellow Reservists approach- 
ing in HU-16B. It is typical of 
training exercises conducted by 
302nd Rescuemen utilizing Lake 
Roosevelt, not far from Phoenix, 
Arizona. © Two volunteer crews 
of the 302nd Air Rescue Sq. pre- 
pare flight plans before depart- 
ing for Scotland where they gave 
rescue support to A N G ' s jets 
during the 1961 Berlin buildup. 



• - 




Thai pilots. "We never had an emer- 
gency, or put a dent in a bird," the 
Major said, adding that the Thais 
really take care of their aircraft. 

The Thailanders expressed a high 
opinion of the Major, in return. 

The training program was con- 
ducted by USAF pilots, supported 
by the Navy section of the Joint U. S. 
Military Advisory Group at Bangkok. 
The course included a rendezvous 
with a U. S. submarine at sea and 
drops to Thai Marines on maneuvers. 
The budding Thai Navy Air Force 
also was called out when a typhoon 
struck Thailand last October, killing 
about 2,000 persons. Tidal waves 
driven by the storm washed over 
whole villages. The Thai pilots, un- 
der instruction from the American 
pilots, made a number of landings 
to assess damage and need of relief. 
Admiral Damri Palkavongae na 
Ayudhaya, new commander-in-chief 
of the Royal Thai Navy, took a spe- 
cial interest in the training of his 
pilots. He was sold on the value of 
his new air force when he had to 
investigate an incident occurring on 
one of his ships at sea. 

Major Fallgren and a Thai pilot 
flew him out to the vessel as it 
steamed on patrol. Landing along- 
side, they put the admiral aboard and 
waited while he finished his investi- 
gation. Within an hour he was return- 
ing to the capital. 

He recalled that Admiral Damri 
asked why the U. S. Navy had pilots 
in Air Force uniform instructing Thai 
Navy pilots. "1 told him it was even 
more cosmopolitan than that. I said 
I wasn't even a Regular Air Force 
pilot, just a chicken farmer who flew 
in the USAF Reserves. He laughed 
and called me his favorite chicken 
farmer after that," Fallgren said. 

Maj. Gen. Joseph A. Cunningham, 
commander of MATS Air Rescue 
Service, recently paid the following 
tribute to these dedicated Reservists: 
"In the recent Cuban crisis Air Res- 
cue Reservists again demonstrated, as 
they have time and again over the 
years, their high degree of combat 
readiness and their willingness to lay 
it on the line and sacrifice for our 
country's good. It is a source of pride 
and confidence to our active rescue 
units to have these competent selfless 
men on our team." 




The rugged face of Oregon's Mt. Hood (1 1 ,245') serv 
as search area for 304th Rescue Squadron HU-16 cm 




Capt. Onesi (I) and SSgt. Walker of the 305th Resa 
Sq., await pilot's command to drop MA-1 sea rescue k 




California mountain used by 303rd Rescuemen (l- 
Sanders, Watkins and Batiste, for evacuation practic 



10 



insure a truly Ready Reserve position, UMD authorizations must be filled 
h qualified members of the Air Reserve Forces. Listed below are the num- 

of vacancies at Air Force Reserve Hospitals and Air National Guard 
ather Flights. Positions offer up to 48 paid drills, a 15-day tour of active 
y annually, retirement points, and possible promotion. Applicants should 
te directly to unit of choice, giving full name, address, grade and AFSC. 



LEGEND 

Officer grade identification: 
0-2/3, 1st Lt. & Capt.; 0-4, Maj.; 
0-5, Lt. Col. and 0-6, Col. En- 
listed: AFSC identifies skill level. 
The #7 in AFSC 90270 indicates 
openings for MSgts/TSgts. Sim- 
ilarly, #9 refers to CMSgts/ 
SMSgts. and #5 to SSgts/AlC. 



HOSPITALS-AFRes 



HOSPITALS-AFRes 



HOSPITALS-AFRes 



WEATHER FLIGHTS-ANG 



619th USAF Hosp. 
>ton Army Base, Mass. 



>FFICER 
C Grade No 

0-2/3 

0-4 

0-2/3 

0-2/3 

0-2/3 

0-4 

0-5 

0-5 

0-5 

0-5 

0-5 

0-6 

0-4 

0-5 

0-5 

0-5 

0-4 

0-2/3 



9735 0-2/3 2 

0-4 1 

9745 0-2/3 1 

0-4 1 

9754 0-2/3 6 

9926 0-5 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

90250B 26 

90258 9 

90270B 9 

90274 2 

90277 6 

90290 3 

90450B 5 

90470B 2 

90670 3 

90671 2 
90770 1 
90870 1 



631st USAF Hosp. 

amilton AFB, Calif. 



iFFICER 

C Grade No. 

0-2/3 1 

0-4 

0-5 

0-2/3 

O^J 

0-2/3 

O^J 

0-5 

0-2/3 

0-5 



0-4 

0-5 

0-4 

0-5 

0-6 

0-5 

0-5 

0-5 

0-5 

0-6 

0-5 

0-6 

O-l 

0-5 

0-2/3 

0-5 



9636 O^l 
9656 O^J 

0-5 

0-6 
9716 0-5 

9725 0-2/3 1 

9735 0-2/3 6 

9745 0-2/3 2 

9754 0-2/3 85 

0-4 2 

9856 0-2/3 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

90250B 15 

90252 4 

90254 2 

90255 2 
90258 6 
90270B 29 
90274 3 
90277 7 
90290 6 
90470B 3 
90490 2 
90690 1 
90670 5 
90790 1 



620th USAF Hosp. 
MacDill AFB, Fla. 



•FFICER 

C Grade No. 
0-2/3 
0-4 
0-2/3 
0-2/3 
0-2/3 
O-l 
0-5 
0-4 
0-5 
0-5 
0-5 
0-5 
0-5 
O^t 
0-2/3 
0-4 
0-4 
0-4 



9656 0-5 1 

9716 0-5 1 

9725 0-2/3 4 

9735 0-2/3 2 

9745 0-2/3 1 

0-4 1 

9754 0-2/3 15 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

90250B 14 

90252 2 

90255 1 

90258 4 

90270B 5 

90277 1 

90290 1 

90370 1 

90450B 5 

90470B 2 

90570 2 



637th USAF Hosp. 
Algiers, La. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

9216 0-2/3 

0-4 
9226 0-2/3 
9236 0-2/3 
9416 0-4 
9436 0-5 
9446 0-5 
9456 0-5 
9486 0-5 
9576 0-4 
9656 0-5 
9716 0-4 2 
9725 0-2/3 5 



9735 0-2/3 3 

0-4 1 

9754 0-2/3 17 

0-4 1 

9856 0-2/3 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

90250B 20 

90252 3 

90254 1 

90270B 6 

90274 2 

90290 1 

90690 1 



635th USAF Hosp. 
NY 14, NY 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

9216 0-2/3 2 

0-5 
9226 0-2/3 

0-4 
9236 0-2/3 

O^J 
9326 0-4 

0-5 
9336 0-5 
9386 0-6 
9416 0-5 

0-6 
9456 0-5 

0-6 
9486 0-5 
9576 0-5 
9586 0-2/3 

9626 0-4 

0-5 

9636 O-* 



0-5 1 

9656 0-4 1 

0-5 1 

0-6 1 

9716 0-5 1 

9725 0-2/3 12 

9735 0-2/3 6 

0-5 1 

9745 0-2/3 2 

0-4 1 

9754 0-2/3 69 

0-4 3 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

01090 1 

90250B 28 

90270B 23 

90290 6 

90470B 3 

90490 2 

90570 1 

98170 2 



628th USAF Hosp. 
Baltimore, Md. 



OFFICER 

AFSC Grade No. 

9216 0-2/3 1 

0-4 1 

9226 0-2/3 1 

9316 0-6 1 

9416 0-4 2 

0-5 1 

9486 0-5 1 

9716 0-4 2 

9725 0-2/3 5 

9735 0-2/3 1 



9745 0-2/3 1 

9754 0-2/3 13 

0-4 2 

ENLISTED 

AFSC No. 

90250B 2 

90252 2 

90270B 1 

90274 2 

90290 1 

90570 2 



625th USAF Hosp. 
Ft. Benj. Harrison, Ind. 



OFFICER 
4FSC Grade No. 

9216 0-2/3 

0-4 
9226 0-2/3 
9236 0-2/3 
9326 0-2/3 
9386 0-4 
9416 O-l 

0-5 
9436 0-5 
9446 0-5 
9486 0-5 
9576 0-4 
9626 0-4 
9716 0-4 2 
9725 0-2/3 3 
9735 0-2/3 2 



0-4 1 

9745 0-2/3 1 

0-4 1 

9754 0-2/3 15 

0-4 2 

9926 0-4 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

90250B 8 

90252 4 

90270B 7 

90274 2 

90290 1 

90450B 3 

90470B 2 

90690 1 

90870 1 



640th USAF Hosp. 
O'Hare IAP, Chicago, III. 



Fit. Location 



Vacancies 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

9216 0-2/3 2 

0-5 1 

9226 0-2/3 2 

0-4 1 

9236 0-2/3 1 

0-4 1 

9316 0-6 1 

9326 0-2/3 1 

9386 0-4 1 

9416 0-5 2 

0-6 3 

9426 0-5 1 

9446 0-5 1 

9456 0-5 1 

0-« 1 

9576 0-5 1 

9586 0-5 1 

9626 0-4 1 

0-5 1 



9636 0-5 1 

9656 0-5 1 

0-6 1 

9716 0-4 2 

9725 0-2/3 11 

0-4 1 

9735 0-2/3 4 

0-4 1 

9745 0-2/3 2 

0-4 1 

9754 0-2/3 77 

0-4 5 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

90270B 28 

90274 2 

90277 7 

90290 3 

90470B 2 

90490 2 

90790 1 



622nd USAF Hosp. 
Carswell AFB, Tex. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

9216 0-2/3 2 

0-4 1 
9226 0-2/3 2 
9236 0-2/3 3 

0-4 
9316 0-6 
9326 0-2/3 

0-4 
9336 0-5 
9416 0-4 

0-6 
9426 0-5 
9436 0-5 
9446 0-5 
9456 0-5 

0-6 
9486 0-5 

0-6 
9576 0-4 
9586 0-2/3 



0-4 1 

9636 0-5 1 

9656 0-5 1 

9716 0-4 2 

0-6 1 

9725 0-2/3 7 

9735 0-2/3 5 

9745 0-2/3 1 

9754 0-2/3 39 

0-4 4 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

90250B 15 

90252 6 

90258 7 

90270B 13 

90277 6 

90290 1 

90370 1 

90450B 2 

90470B 1 

90490 1 



616th USAF Hosp. 
March AFB, Calif. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

9216 0-2/3 2 

0-4 1 

0-5 1 

9226 0-2/3 2 

9236 0-2/3 2 

9326 0-2/3 1 

9336 0-5 1 

9416 0-4 4 

0-5 6 

0-6 1 

9436 0-5 1 

9446 0-5 1 

9456 0-6 1 

9576 0-5 1 

9586 0-4 2 

0-5 1 

9626 O-l 1 

0-5 1 

9636 0-4 1 

0-5 1 

9656 0-5 1 

0-6 1 

9716 0-4 2 





0-6 




9725 


0-2/3 
0-4 


12 


9735 


0-2/3 
0-5 




9745 


0-2/3 
0-4 


2 


9754 


0-2/3 
0-4 


85 


9856 


0-2/3 





ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

90250B 25 

90258 10 

90270B 27 

90277 6 

90290 5 

90350 1 

90370 2 

90470A 1 

90470B 3 

90490 2 

98170 1 

98270 1 



101 


Boston, Mass. 


25370, 
25251 


25271, 


104 


Baltimore, Md. 


25370, 
25251 


25271, 


105 


Nashville. Tenn. 


25370. 
25251 


25271, 


107 


Detroit, 
Mich. 


0-2/3 

25370, 

25251 


(1) 

25271, 


110 


St. Louis, 
Mo. 


0-2/3, 
25370, 
25251, 


0-4(3) 
25271, 
70250 


111 


Ellington AFB, 
Tex. 


0-2/3 

25370, 

25251 


(2) 
25271, 


113 


Terre Haute, 
Ind. 


0-2/3 

25370, 

25251 


(2) 
25271, 


116 


Spokane, 
Wash. 


0-2 '3 

25370, 

25251, 


(1) 

25271, 

70250 


119 


Newark, N. J. 


0-2/3 
25251 


(1) 


121 


Andrews AFB, 
Md. 


0-2/3 

25370, 

25251 


(2) 
25271, 


122 


New Orleans, 
La. 


25370, 
25251 


25271, 


123 


Portland, 
Ore. 


21271, 


70250 


125 


Tulsa, Okla. 


0-2-3 

25370. 

25251, 


(1) 

25271, 

70250 


126 


Milwaukee, 
Wis. 


25370, 

25251 


25271, 


127 


McConnell 
AFB, Kans. 


0-2/3 

25370. 

25251 


(1) 
25271, 


131 


Westfield, 
Mass. 


0-2/3 

25370, 

25251 


(2) 
25271, 


140 


Philadelphia, 
Pa. 


25370, 
25251 


25271, 


146 


Pittsburgh, 
Pa 


25370, 


25271 


154 


Little Rock, 
Ark. 


0-2/3 

25370, 

25251 


(1) 
25271, 


155 


Memphis. 
Tenn. 


0-2/3 

25370, 

25251 


(1) 
25271, 


156 


Charlotte. 
N.C. 


0-2/3 

25370, 

25251 


(1) 
25271, 


163 


Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 


0-2 '3 

25370, 

25251 


(2) 
25271, 


164 


Mansfield. 
Ohio 


0-2/3 

25370. 
25251 


(1) 
25271, 


165 


Louisville, 

Ky. 


25370. 
25251 


25271, 


167 


Charleston. 
W. Va. 


0-2 3 

25370, 

2?251 


(1) 
25271, 


181 


Dallas. Tex. 


0-2 1 

25370. 

25251 


(1) 
25271. 


182 


Kelly AFB, 
Tex. 


0-2 3 

25370, 

25251 


(2) 
25271, 


195 


Van Nuys, 
Calif. 


0-2 - 3 

25370. 

25251 


(2) 
25271. 


196 


Ontario. 
Calif. 


0-2 3 

25370. 

25251 


(1) 
25271, 


198 


San Juan. 
P. R. 


25370. 
25251 


25271, 



199 Hickam AFB. 
Hawaii 



0-2 '3 
25271. 



(1) 

25251 



11 



Reserved 
For You 



T, 



_ he recruiting of Air Force Re- 
servists takes many forms, running 
the gamut from the distribution — on 
a national level — of printed materials 
themed to create a favorable climate 
toward the Air Force Reserve, to the 
production of individualized pamph- 
lets and posters in support of specific 
training program elements. But, one 
of the most professional methods of 
telling the Reserve story to the Ameri- 
can public is Continental Air Com- 
mand's in-house production, "Re- 
served For You." 

The public service weekly radio 
series "Reserved For You," pro- 
duced by CONACs Recruitment Mo- 
tivation Directorate celebrated its 
11th anniversary in April, and the 
letters RFY have a special meaning 
for thousands of Air Force Reserv- 
ists. RFY (Reserved For You) is 
literally music to their ears. It is their 
"commercial." 

RFY's are shipped directly to 
1,570 using AM radio stations to 
assure timely use with national im- 
pact in support of manning objectives 



GOALS 

PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE - 

Family and Employer 

RECRUITME NT-Support of 

weak manning areas 

PRIDE — Country, Reserve, 
Unit 




CONAC Dance Band supplies popular music for RFY shows. 
Commercials are brief, pointed, and reflect themes which 
stimulate Reserve recruiting and enhance public acceptance. ^ 

■ ■ "" -« 




Producing exactly 5 minutes, of "Reserved For You" requires 
perfect timing and technical knowledge. Here MSgt. Fred 
Lyle blends, "voiced with music as he cues his announcer. 



RECOGNITION 

Readiness 



Reserve 



and themes for a given month's series 
of shows. 

Currently, the series consists of six 
5-minute shows, featuring the CON- 
AC Dance Band, under the direction 
of CWO Nicholas Azzolina, with 
commentary by Air Force Reservist 
Capt. Dick George. MSgt. Fred Lyle 
is technical director and audio engi- 
neer. Each show contains a spot an- 
nouncement promoting training pro- 
gram elements of the Air Force Re- 
serve . . . and allows 10 to 30 seconds 
for local unit tie-in. Six shows month- 
ly provide additional selections and 
allow stations programming flexibility. 

"Reserved For You" is tape re- 
corded monthly in the Continental 
Air Command Recording Studio and 
Music Hall at Robins AFB, Ga. Edit- 
ed tapes, along with label information 
and distribution instructions, are 
forwarded on a scheduled basis to the 
General Services Administration 
broadcasting agent for a test pressing. 
Upon approval of the test, production 
discs arc pressed, packaged and dis- 
tributed to requesting stations. 

I he first four programs were pro- 



duced at Boiling AFB, but tec! 
difficulties, time and distance ii 
made it necessary to arrange fo: 
ter facilities at Mitchel AFB. In 

1952 arrangements were made t( 
row radio transcription equip 
from the State Department (Vo 
America), and in January 19 
small recording studio was comp 
at Mitchel, then CONAC Hq. 

Initially, the programs feature 
USAF Dance Band, using a 15 
ute format. Two shows per disc, 
pressed with some commentary 
phase of the Reserve Program 
guest speaker. Six programs wen 
duced in 600 copies each, ani 
tributed to the numbered Air I 
under CONACs jurisdiction in 

Fifty-two shows were produ< 

1953 and 529 radio stations re] 
using the program. Public Servi 
time obtained was estimated i 
million dollars, while the prod 
costs, including the wages of m 
personnel engaged in the prodi| 
was estimated at $18,000 am 
Today the production costs for 
discs averages about $7,500 a 



12 




'S 



■ Total EM " 



GOALS 

AANNING - 5,000 prior 
ervice men by June 30 

MOTIVATION - Opera- 
ion Muster and Try One pro- 
irams 

ESPONSIBILITY - Every 
Guardsman 

AVERAGE -All informa- 
ion media 



aj. Gen. Winston P. Wilson, 
:y chief, National Guard Bureau, 
tressed the necessity for an all- 
ecruiting effort, indicating that 
jture of the Air National Guard 
the allocation of funds for its 
ition may very well hinge on 
ler they can fill their vacancies 
e end of Fiscal Year 1963. 
ie General called upon each 
dsman to dedicate himself to as- 
vith the task of recruiting the 
>ximately 5,000 prior service 



men needed before June 30. 

Additional funds have been allotted 
for the purpose of producing recruit- 
ing and motivation materials to assist 
in what the General calls the "total 
effort," and the Guard is now on the 
final leg of its recruiting campaign, 
labeled Operation Muster. 

The Try One program (The Air 
Reservist, Jan. '63) is being given 
special attention. A pamphlet has 
been produced and distributed to 
field units explaining this special pro- 
gram. Under Try One, former serv- 
icemen from any branch of the 
armed forces or from the reserve 
components are permitted to enlist 
in the Air National Guard on a one- 
year period trial basis and at the rank 
he held while on active duty. 

A letter, signed by General Wilson, 
now goes to each Air Guardsman 
whose date of separation comes be- 
tween now and June 30. In it, the 
General makes a personal appeal to 
the man to reenlist. 

In addition, the Guard Bureau is 
producing printed and recorded radio 
spot announcements, live action tele- 
vision announcements, and a variety 



of pamphlets, booklets and posters. 

At field level, some of the results 
have been stimulating. The 184th 
Tactical Fighter Group, McConnell 
AFB, Kan., took advantage of Wichi- 
ta's week-long Sport, Boat and Travel 
Show, to bring the ANG story before 
the public eye. An attractive display 
was set up on the show grounds, and 
Guardsmen were there to explain the 
Try One program and define the bene- 
fits of Guard affiliation. 

About a month later the 1 84th fol- 
lowed this effort with what they 
termed a Buddy Day, which permitted 
personal guests of the Guardsmen to 
get a detailed description of the unit's 
mission and virtually every aspect of 
Air Guard operations. A question and 
answer session followed this person- 
alized tour, and led to a good per- 
centage of the more than 1 50 Buddies 
to express a decided interest in be- 
coming members of the unit. 

The efforts of this group, when 
multiplied by the number of similar 
ANG units, will produce the total 
effort of which General Wilson 
speaks, and should make the Guard's 
goal easily attainable. 




FGp., serg 




13 



Miami CD and CAP personnel chart "swamp buggy" 
rescue of crashed helicopter off Florida's Tamiami 
Trail this year— Photo by Sanders, Miami Herald. 



CAP-owned aircraft of California's San Fei 
Airport Squadron 35, prepares for mission, 
one of several planes operated by that seam 




1 962 was a year of added prestige 
for the Civil Air Patrol. Among other 
things, CAP pilots marked their or- 
ganization's 21st anniversary by lead- 
ing the nation's Search and Rescue 
(SAR) activities. They logged 56 per- 
cent, or 19,667 of the 34,841 hours 
flown by both military and civilian 
pilots under this country's SAR plan. 

SAR is coordinated nationally by 
the Military Air Transport Service's 
Air Rescue Service at its head- 
quarters at Orlando AFB, Fla. Area 
Air Rescue Centers are at Robins 
AFB, Ga. (Eastern), Richards- 
Gebaur AFB, Mo. (Central) and 
Hamilton AFB, Calif. (Western). 

Alaska led CAP's 52 wings by 
flying 5.183 hours of the nation's 
inland total. 

The Air Rescue Service's semi- 
annual report for the first half of 
1962 placed CAP at flying slightly 
more than 5 1 percent of total hours 
flown. A three-wing search in Georgia 
and a multitude of searches in Alaska 
brought CAP's total to 56 percent. 

North Carolina, Georgia and Ten- 
nessee wings battled bitter cold, 
snow, turbulence and high winds in 
;i search mission for a pilot missing on 




Air Patrol News 



a flight from Atlanta, Ga., to Dunlap, 
lnd. The fatal crash site was found 
five days later, not far from Atlanta. 

Far to the northwest, an accident 
involving a CAP pilot, added con- 
siderably to Alaska Wing's SAR time. 
The pilot was forced to parachute 
when his plane caught fire while 
transporting gasoline about 1 50 miles 
from Anchorage. He later told res- 
cuers that the plane's wing fell off, 
the fuselage exploded, and "the bird 
just died." 

CAP and other pilots searched 
the desolate country for six days 
before spotting the downed pilot near 
an abandoned cabin. He had survived 
by eating caribou moss and burning 
parts of the cabin for firewood. Four- 
teen CAP planes were in the air when 
he was finally sighted. 

Searches go on almost daily in 
every wing of CAP as the following 
seven year record testifies: 



EAR 


MISSIONS 


SORTIES 


1956 


160 


6,323 


1957 


156 


7,413 


1958 


157 


7,401 


1959 


201 


8,401 


1960 


216 


9,873 


1961 


442 


11,267 


1962 


384 


10,136 



Prestige was further enl 
when Western Air Rescue Cei 
Hamilton AFB, Calif., recenti 
permission from the governing 
of the CAP corporation for 
civilian pilots to operate in the 
areas across the borders of | 
and Canada. 

Despite a decline in availab 
plus aircraft from the Gover 
the number of privately owned 
and licensed pilot members ii 
has been on the upswing. Av 
aircraft now stands at 4,3C 
increase of 150 over recent n 
Pilot membership was 9,292 
count. More cadets are learr 
fly from their own resource: 
more seniors own aircraft. 

CAP is also strengthening 
tional youth program — the or 
of its kind combining military t 
and aerospace education. Its g 
the next four years is 160,000 
and cadet members. Today's s 
is over 76,000 of which 42,0 
in the cadet corps. 

Now in it's twenty-seconc 
CAP is still a flying organiza 
volunteer civilians that will sc 
at the ring of a telephone. 



u 



n the modern concept, a theater of military operations may include the whole territory of a heh 
erent country or coalition, whole continents, large bodies of water, as well as extensive air and 

— from the new Soviet book Military Strategy 



%mic space 



Air Force 
Point 01 View 



ng range planners recognize that the piloted air- 
craft will be a vital requirement in the defense forces 
>ur Nation for many purposes for as far as we can 
in the future. They will be necessary in a mixed 
e of strategic missiles and aircraft — and later, aero- 
:ecraft and piloted and pilotless spacecraft. To point 
the advantages of aircraft is not to imply that they 
better weapons than missiles. Each kind of system 

advantages and disadvantages; they complement 
1 other. The missiles' advantages in speed, penetra- 

capability and survivability are widely publicized. 

Not widely understood is the fact that ICBMs and 
iris missiles are designed for use, if necessary, only 
i nuclear warheads, whereas aircraft can be used 
i either nuclear or non-nuclear weapons in wars 
ill the varying intensities of conflict. 

Among the capabilities for which many Air Force 
raft currently are particularly well suited: 

• Can destroy, discriminately, military targets, par- 
ticularly those near cities. 

• Can destroy deeply hardened strategic missiles. 

• Can detect and promptly destroy mobile strike 
forces, mobile aerospace defense forces, and other 
mobile forces and systems. 

• Have optional uses, with either nuclear or jion- 
nuclear weapons. 

• Can perform reconnaissance and wartime as- 
sessment of target damage. 

• Are recallable and reusable. 

• Can "show the flag" in a "show of force." 

Since we have no reason to destroy population 
ers as such, there is a major category of targets 
which missiles are not considered the best weapon 
luse of their relatively limited accuracy. These are 
high priority military targets in or near cities. Destruc- 

of the targets can be accomplished by aircraft with 
Her weapons delivered with pinpoint accuracy. 

Missiles cannot be used efficiently to destroy mobile 
iiles. And only very powerful ballistic missiles with 
ially 100 percent reliability and accuracy could 



destroy hardened strategic missiles on a one-for-one 
basis. Piloted aircraft could perform these functions 
more effectively. 

Piloted aircraft have an added advantage also over 
pilodess weapon systems in their adaptability to opera- 
tions in cold war, counterinsurgency, or limited war, as 
well as general war — and their ability to make best use of 
non-nuclear warheads. 

Too often when the capabilities of piloted aircraft 
in a general war are being discussed, the environment of 
such a war is not considered. But in a realistic discus- 
sion, it must be. There is a misunderstanding about how 
strategic aircraft would be used in modern warfare. The 
World War II picture of massed bombers winging their 
way over enemy targets amid bursts of anti-aircraft flak 
is for the history books. Strategic air warfare tactics of 
this kind went out with the advent of nuclear weapons, 
improved bombers and advancements in air defense. 

The advent of missiles is changing the tactics of 
counterattack. Use of missiles plus aircraft permits an 
initial one-two counterstrike. First would come the 
softening up of enemy radar and military command 
centers, plus enemy air defense missile sites, air fields 
and surface-to-surface missile bases, by strikes from our 
long-range ballistic missiles and missile-and-bomb-car- 
rying aircraft. The aircraft would use penetration tactics 
and devices unknown in World War II. Then more of 
our aircraft would strike — some with explosives heavier 
and more powerful than any of our missiles can deliver, 
others with multiple small weapons for use against a 
variety of targets. While large forces of our aircraft 
would head toward their targets at first warning, and 
could be recalled if the warning of attack proved false, 
our ICBMs (launched after it was certain that we had 
been attacked) would beat many aircraft to the target 
area, severely degrading the enemy's air defenses. 

The piloted vehicle is a weapon system not only of 
the past, but of the future. Missiles and aircraft are 
complementary weapon systems, each with definite and 
decided advantages. Although the growing performance 
capability of missiles indicates they will have a major 
role, the tasks for piloted vehicles are equally important; 
their uses are many and varied in cold war, counter- 
insurgency, limited war, and general war. 



Proposed increase in Army aviation would require 
increases in the Air Force. The Secretary of Defense has 
approved a proposal of the Army Howze Board (headed 
by Lt. Gen. Hamilton H. Howze) for the Army to test 
air assault and support units, substituting Army aircraft 
for trucks and tanks and otherwise providing much of 
its own air-delivered firepower, air reconnaissance and 
air transport in the battle area. Experts both in the 
Army and the Air Force agree that, if approved, the 
proposed "air mobile operations" would require an in- 
crease in the Army's present reliance on the Air Force 
for air support, such as strategic airlift, intra-theater air- 
lift, troop carrier operations, long-range reconnaissance, 
interdiction of the battle area, counter-air and close air 
support. Moreover, in the area of Air Force tactical air 
transport, additional air support would be required to 
operate aerial lines of communications. 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



O/l C-97 cockpit, displayed at one of two 
Open House recruiting drives by the 9603rd 
AFRes Recovery Sq., Billings, Mont., brought 
this "Will it bite?" expression to young Bart 
Christiansen. Capt. Robert L. Ransom, USAF, 
helped quell Bart's fears. © A hero in '57 
when he air-searched and found a missing two- 
year old, Capt. Donald Mageean, ANG (Vt.) 
jet pilot and CAP wing operations officer, 
duplicated the feat this March when he located 
missing crash victim, Dr. Peter Garner. © 
Summer encampment plans for ANG's 108th 
TFWg., McGuire AFB, N.J., are reviewed by 
Commander, Brig. Gen. Donald J. Strait and 
staff, (l-r) Lt. Col. H. Cumberland, Gen. 
Strait, Capt. W. Deiner and Lt. Col. R. Ritch- 
ings.Q Faced with leaving the AF Reserve 
by a UMD revision of the 459th TCWg., 
Andrews AFB, Md., (l-r) SSgts Dorothy Faulk- 
ner, Olivia Brown and Cleo Burgess remained 
true to AF blue by accepting assignments with 
the (formerly all-male) 2493rd AF Reserve 
Sector, Boiling AFB, D.C. 



USAF Recurring Publication 
No. 30-H-4-63-3 16,449 




4-63-652498 




^ 




AT 






the air reservist 



x 




letv look 



or 



lir guard 
lircrafi 



The Official Magazine Of The Air Reserve Forces 



the air reservist 



Vol. XV— No. 5 June 1963 



. 



AIR NATIONAL GUARD 
AIR FORCE RESERVE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 



EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 



The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of Ho USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, D.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq USAF. 



tfte air res> 

"" ()HI» 







"New Look" ihowing recently adopted 
Minuteman imignis of Air National 
Guard it proudly displayed on swept 
back tail of this Springfield-based 
(Ohio ANG) F-84F Thundersfreak. 
Insignia, with state name above, will 
identify all Air Guard aircraft. 



Scanning the news 



Reservi§t8 Help USAF with Sonic Boom Problem 



c, \J*Oo^' eeAom \l 




Reservists of Miami Information Flight are helping USAF quell "Sora 
Boom" fears. Original radio & TV spots, printed materials, newspape 
articles, speeches, and the above 15' x 54' billboard are part of the effon 



RECOVERY IN 

SNOWSTORM 



B 1 i nding 
snow- 
storms are 
not uncommon in Utah, but the vol- 
untary efforts of an Air Force Re- 
serve Recovery squadron during a 
storm are, and deserve recognition. 
Last April 19, Mother Nature hung 
a "Closed for Business" sign on the 
front door of Hill AFB, Utah, forcing 
a flight of three F-84s to divert to 
the Salt Lake City Municipal Airport 
about 20 miles to the south. 

Maj. Al Conta, commander of the 
9627th Air Force Reserve Recov- 
ery Squadron and his maintenance 
officer, Maj. Donald Cook have an 
agreement with the tower operators 
whereby one or the other is informed 
immediately of such unusual landings, 
especially those involving Regular Air 
Force aircraft. Since the recovery of 
military aircraft is the squadron's pri- 
mary mission, these Reservists feel 
their unit's participation in such ac- 
tual emergencies affords the best pos- 
sible training and practical experi- 
ence. Upon learning of the F-84s' 
precarious situation the "tower" op- 
erators at Salt Lake City immediately 
notified Maj. Al Conta. In turn, Major 



Conta spread the word by teleph 
to the members of his squadroi 
their places of business. Within 
minutes the first Reservist (SSgt. 
Glow) arrived, to be followed she 
thereafter by the other members, 
within one hour of landing the F- 
were back in the air and headed 
their destination. And so, the 
servists marked one more instanc 
Recovery readiness and capabi 

However, a C-133B Globema 
facing the same weather conditi 
quickly brought the Reservists I 
out to the airport. The huge aire 
the largest turboprop transport in 
Air Force inventory, landed ' 
hopes of being refueled immedh 
in order to proceed on its missioi 

Not having the amounts of fue 
other supplies (liquid oxygen) 
quired by the C-133, the Reser 
were almost forced to give the 
craft commander a negative ans 
But the basic concept of the Reco 
program leaves little room for 
ative answers and provides n 
latitude for initiative and persf 
ance, and these Reservists perfor 
according to their training. 

The problem was quickly so 






ound trip over snowy roads to 
^FB. With only a few hours 

the big craft was once again 
to continue its mission. 
ice within the space of one day 

Recovery Reservists, volun- 
ill, proved not only their readi- 
ind dedication, but served also 
lonstrate the day-to-day practi- 
of the Air Force Reserve Re- 
r concept. 



CONVENTION 
AT SAN JUAN 



The 47th 
annual 
meeting of 
jjutants General Association of 
nited States, held in San Juan, 
> Rico, April 21-25, was a cue 
jard leaders and others to take 
of the National Guard situation, 
ing problems and accomplish- 
and predicting its future, 
j. Gen. Winston P. Wilson, dep- 
lief of the National Guard Bu- 
outlined an impressive array of 
:ms from pilot shortage and in- 
ate school quotas, to lack of 
ft and other equipment, 
called on Guardsmen in the 
to study the problems that face 
and to propose solutions, no 
• how unorthodox, to the NGB. 
leral Wilson told the Adjutants 
al that above all the National 
1 must not let tide of events run 
t but must, by boldness, deter- 
ion and imagination, remain 
r of its fate. 

g. Gen. I. G. Brown, assistant 
NGB, for Air, said that the 
I's performance over the last 
s best symbolized by the owl. 
le said, the Guard has shown, 
jatience to sit out the tension 
arying challenges of the world 
on . . . and the wisdom to meet, 
:e, evaluate and act on the many 



requirements and changes that events 
and DOD have asked of it." 

Going into the specifics of the 
year's highlights, he mentioned some 
of the many activities of the ANG in- 
cluding participation in the Cuban 
crisis; providing striker and inter- 
ceptor aircraft in support of tests on 
our Air Defense system; and photo 
reconnaissance missions flown to pro- 
vide films for the AF Library. 

In addition, he mentioned that the 
Air Guard's Air Defense units on 24- 
hour alert had scrambled 9,915 times, 
accomplished 16,620 intercepts and 
flown 19,195 hours under Air De- 
fense Command control so far this 
fiscal year. The Guard's heavy air 
transport units accomplished 2,101 
flights, flying approximately half a 
million miles, he said. 

For the future, General Brown out- 
lined several plans to increase Air 
Guard versatility and combat readi- 
ness. One of these is the new concept 
whereby Guard air transport units in 
the western states are to fly training 
missions over the Atlantic and eastern 
units are getting a chance to fly mis- 
sions over the Pacific. In this way all 
Air Guard transport units will be- 
come familiar with operational diffi- 
culties in both oceans. 

In the crucial area of recruiting, 
the General announced that the Air 
Guard had a net gain of 1,344 men 
during March, and another 1,401 
for April; figures that are well over the 
monthly goal. However, he warned 
against the possibility of overconfi- 
dence and urged that the total effort 
continue to bring the Air Guard to 
full strength by June 30. 

In closing, General Brown said he 
was optimistic about the prospects of 
the Guard. He feels that, "The skills 
we have developed among our peo- 
ple over the years will be valuable 



assets to the nation in the future, re- 
gardless of whether the missions are in 
counterinsurgency or in outer space." 

Another speaker at the conference, 
Lt. Gen. David A. Burchinal, Air 
Force deputy chief of staff for plans 
and operations said, ". . . our active 
forces are insufficient to meet all con- 
tingencies, and we must rely on our 
Reserve Forces for operationally 
ready units and trained individuals." 

General Burchinal promised the 
Air Guard new and better equipment 
just as soon as the Air Force received 
some itself. He said the increased pro- 
curement of F-4Cs, and the TFX will 
mean additional F-lOOs and later 
F-105s for the Reserve Forces. 

For the future General Burchinal 
said he saw "... a continued likeli- 
hood that Reserve and Guard units 
will be called upon to assist when- 
ever a real trouble spot appears." 

He said that "Our concept of real 
readiness is working; it has been 
tested in crisis; it has been found 
equal to very severe demands. 

"We have every confidence that 
our Reserve establishment will con- 
tinue to grow, to improve, and its 
mission will continue to expand." 



ROA CONVENES 
AT MIAMI BEACH 



More than 
1,500 dele- 
gates and 
guests of the Reserve Officers Asso- 
ciation are expected to converge upon 
Miami Beach, Fla., for the 37th an- 
nual Convention, to be held there 
this month (13th thru 15th). 

Although the convention's formal 
opening is scheduled for June 13, 
many of the delegates will arrive a 
day earlier for registration and the 
traditional president's reception. 

Air Force Secretary Eugene Zuck- 
ert will be this year's keynote speaker. 



Conventions 



Mr. John Lang, deputy for Reserve 
i ROTC, and Brig. Gen. Donald 
■npbell, commander, 302nd TCWg., 
raton County AFB, Ohio, award local 
neral Electric plant manager David 
iw a certificate of appreciation for 
npany's excellent cooperation with 
ployee/Reservists during last year's 
ban recall. Mr. Lang was principal 
taker at the ROA state convention in 
irton. © Maj. Gen. James Cantwell, 
n president of Adjutants General 
sociation, spoke at convention as suc- 
sor, Maj. Gen. Edwin Heywood and 
. Benjamin Fridge, Air Force special 
istant (Manpower, Personnel and Re- 
ve Forces) listen. 



IK 



• I * I 

, . , i . , . it*.. 




1 



Scanning the news 



COULEE CREST 
USES 452nd TCW 




European Reserve Officers, members of CIOR, attended LOGEX '63 as 
observers. Here they are briefed by Brig. Gen. James McPartlin, commander 
of the USAF contingent assisting with the Army's map maneuver exercise. 



continued from page 3 

In April, the ROA's National 
Council adopted a resolution which 
praised the speed with which 14,000 
Air Force Reservists answered the 
nation's call in the Cuban crisis of 
last year, terming it "unique in the 
annals of military history." The reso- 
lution lauded the emergency airlift 
provided by C-l 19 and C-123 aircraft 
of the units called to active duty and 
others which volunteered their serv- 
ices, including the 25 Recovery units. 
Though not called up, personnel of 
the latter units assembled "volun- 
tarily and without pay" to meet the 
needs of the active Air Force. Copies 
of the resolution were sent to the sec- 
retary of Defense, secretary of the Air 
Force, the chief of staff and com- 
mander of Continental Air Command, 
and Tactical Air Command. 



RESERVISTS AID J^r^Y' 

JOINT EXERCISES luujsa, 
Coulee 
Crest and Big Blast Papa, may not 
mean much to the man in the street, 
but they have a familiar ring to many 
members of the Air Reserve Forces. 
They are the names of three exer- 
cises which various units of the Air 
Force Reserve or Air National Guard 
have participated in during the past 
two months. This month, Air Guards- 
men will take part in another exer- 
cise — Apache Opal. It will be fol- 
lowed by the big one — Swift Strike' 
III — commencing in July. 



LOGEX '63 TESTS 
AFRes REACTION 



LOGEX is 
the brief 
title given 
the U. S. Army's command post ex- 
ercise and map maneuver conducted 
annually with the cooperation of the 
U. S. Air Force, the Department of 
State and the U. S. Navy. This year's 
LOGEX began in late April and 
ended May 10. 

LOGEX '63 was held at Fort Lee, 
near Richmond, Va., and 46 Air 
Force Reservists participated, serving 
active duty tours ranging from seven 
to fifteen days each. The Reservists 
came from a variety of CONAC 
units, some from troop carrier wings, 
air terminal and aerial port squad- 
rons, and others from recovery units, 
aeromedical evacuation and casualty 
staging squadrons. 

Primarily a logistic exercise, 
LOGEX '63 was built about a hypo- 
thetical general war between allied 
forces and an aggressor, involving 
the employment of nuclear weapons. 
In general the exercise consisted of 
participant reaction to certain situa- 
tions and requirements, some of which 
existed when the problem opened and 
others which were presented during 
the exercise. 

LOGEX '63 provided student offi- 
cers of the Army technical and ad- 
ministrative service schools the op- 
portunity to apply the theories learned 
at their respective schools. Also, it 
gave emphasis to the value of inter- 
service cooperation, and afforded the 
participating Reservists a source of 
interservice training. 



E x e rci 
C o ul| 
Crest, J 

largest troop exercise ever staged i 
the West Coast, was conducted in t 
vicinity of Yakima, Wash., fro 
April 30 to May 20. 

The joint exercise which involv 
some 40,000 soldiers and airme 
was held by the U. S. Strike Coi 
mand. Its battlefield covered a n 
neuver area of more than one milli 
acres, and live firing was conduct 
by air and ground components 
the opposing sides. 

Air Reserve Forces participati 
was limited to aircraft and person 
of the 452nd Troop Carrier Wi 
which provided 10 C-l 19s. Seven 
these were from March AFB, Cal 
and three from its detachment at I 
AFB, Utah. Fifty-seven officers a 
twenty-four enlisted crewmen fl 
into Gray Army Air Field, Was 
on May 5, for initial operations. F 
of the officers were assigned to 
Combat Airlift Support Unit (Ci 
SU). Maj. William Martin, b 
operations officer for the 452nd 
March AFB, commanded the unit. 

The C-l 19s were used to fly act 
and simulated air evacuation, ca 
and courier missions. They ser 
both Red and Blue Forces. 

Figures available at press ti 
show that during the first four d 
of the exercise, C-l 19s airlif 
29,000 pounds of assorted cargo i 
a total of 668 passengers. The lai 
included 345 simulated and 21 act 
casualties. The "patients" were 
evacuated from casualty staging ar 
at forward air strips to Gray. 

The Reservists flew 61 sorties, 
pending 171 flying hours in dii 
support of the exercise while logg 
a total of 228 hours overall. 



SWIFT STRIKE III 
STARTS IN JULY 



Swift stl 
III w 
comme 

July 21 with many Air Rese 
Forces personnel, units, aircraft : 
equipment scheduled to particip 
The maneuver ends August 16. 

Reservists from 16 of CONA 
flying units and a total of almost '. 
aircraft, both C-l 19 and C-123, 
provide airlift support for the "R 
and "Blue" forces in this mass 
U. S. Strike Command military i 
neuver conducted in the Carolii 
STRICOM, commanded by C 
Paul D. Adams, USA, is the uni 
command which operates directly 
der the Joint Chiefs of Staff. ] 
mobile, flexible and highly trai 



is composed of combat-ready 

of Air Force's Tactical Air 
tnand and the Continental Army 
tnand. Seventy-five thousand 
[COM troops will engage in the 
ided field training exercise, 
sides providing practical train- 
or the participants, Swift Strike 
vill serve as a proving ground 
ne employment of new systems. 
1 important change to the cur- 
system of air support will be 
1 thoroughly during the ma- 
;r. The "Direct Air Support 
m" will find Air Force's For- 

Air Controllers (The AIR 
ERVIST, Aug '62), Army's 
id commanders and Air Force 
ttions centers, using newly de- 
ed communications equipment 
eed up the air support reaction 
in front line situations, 
e following Air Force Reserve 

carrier groups (13 using C-119 
ift and three using the C-123) 
wovide airlift for the three-week 
ise: 901st, L. G. Hanscom Field, 
.; 902nd Grenier Field, N.H.; 
l and 907th, Clinton County 

Ohio; 930th and 931st, Baka- 
iFB, Ind.; 932nd, Scott AFB, 
915th Homestead AFB, Fla.; 
l, Bates Field, Ala.; 933rd, Gen- 
Mitchell Field, Wise; 934th, 
eapolis-St. Paul International 
>rt, Minn.; 912th and 913th, 
\S Willow Grove, Pa., and the 
i, Niagara Falls Municipal Air- 
N. Y. The three C-123 groups 
?18th, Dobbins AFB, Ga., and 
>19th and 920th at Memphis 
cipal Airport, Tenn. 
servists from these units are 
uled to fly more than a thou- 
sorties, airdropping cargo and 
roops, and ferrying cargo. Dur- 
ast year's exercise CONAC's 
ve aircraft flew 1,222 sorties 
2,703 hours, dropping 5,416 
•oops, air-landing 4,219 infan- 
n, and transporting 2,322 tons 
rgo. Each of the 2,703 hours 
lown without a-' accident. 
>NAC will be supplying further 
ance for the maneuver in the 
of more than 400 Air Force 
ve members of the Recovery 
am. Three Recovery squadrons, 
9313th, Laurenburg, N. C, 
:h, Spartanburg, S. C., and the 
:h, Anderson, S. C, will serve 
ect support of STRICOM's di- 
-controller headquarters at 
anburg. The three squadrons, 
>ers of the 8439th Recovery 
3 at Charlotte, N. C, will 
ad" their active duty service 
the period of Swift Strike III. 
e Recovery squadrons will per- 



form the functions for which they 
constantly train, servicing aircraft 
with fuel and minor maintenance, 
and providing aircrews transportatioi 
and crash-rescue protection. 

Two other Recovery squadrons, 
the 9305th Winston-Salem, N. C, 
and 9306th, High Point, N. C, will 
serve at a Swift Strike III deploy- 
ment site, Bush Field, Augusta, Ga., 
in direct support of the exercise. 

Air National Guard tactical fighter, 
reconnaissance, troop carrier and 
other units from nine states will take 
part in the exercise. They are: 102nd 
Tactical Fighter Gp., Boston, Mass.; 
107th TFWg., Niagara Falls, N.Y.; 
184th TFGp., Wichita, Kans.; 117th 
Tactical Reconnaissance Wg., Birm- 
ingham, Ala.; 123rd TacRecon Wg., 
Louisville, Ky.; 127th TacRecon Wg., 
Detroit, Mich.; 130th Troop Carrier 
Gp., Charleston, W. Va.; 135th 
TCGp., Baltimore, Md. and the 143rd 
TCGp., of Providence, R.I. Commu- 
nications units also will participate. 



The Air 
Force is 



EXTRA POWER 

FOR ANG KC-97 

preparing a 

feasibility study to determine whether 
or not the Air National Guard can 
add extra power in the form of jet 
engines to its three squadrons of 
KC-97 air refuelers. 

If the proposal should be approved, 
the addition of jet engines to the 
prop-driven KC-97 would greatly in- 
crease its capability, allowing the jet 
augmented aircraft to take a prime 
place in the TAC's aircraft inventory 
alongside its first-line fighters. 

The improved air refueler would 
have greatly increased flexibility. It 
would be capable of refueling all Air 
Force and Navy refuelable receivers 
at altitudes up to 30,000 feet and at 
the mach number of the KC-97, with 
more fuel than TAC's present KB-50. 

The modification would make the 
KC-97 capable of logistic support of 
contingency and counterinsurgency 
operations at short length forward 
airstrips, supplying tactical aircraft 
with fuel, supplies and support per- 
sonnel. It would, in fact, make the 
three Air Guard squadrons complete- 
ly mobile and essentially self-support- 
ing tanker forces. 

The jet-augmented tanker could 
take off from 5,000-foot runways 
carrying maximum gross loads with 
a greater safety factor than the pres- 
ent model has on a two mile runway. 

With reduced loads the plane could 
safely operate from much shorter 
strips making it useful for Army and 
counterinsurgency operations. 







O During LOGEX '63, Air Force Reservist 
TSgt. William Moseley (I) relays informa- 
tion to Regular AF counterpart, MSgt. 
Eugene demons. © Brig. Gen. Andrew 
Cannon, commander, 6th AFRes Region, 
presents OOD award to Mr. Ira Bechtold 
for work with Reserve's Military Affiliate 
Radio System program. © Maj. Gen. Ray- 
mond Reeves (r), vice commander, MATS, 
accepts tribute certificate from Maj. Gen. 
Winston P. Wilson, Deputy Chief, NGB, for 
his command's contributions toward firm re- 
lationship with Air National Guard program. 



jg£5| 




Scanning the news 



"Muster Day" Aids ANG Recruiting. 

— i — r 




Thirty thousand spectators crowded San Juan's new stadium to witness Muster 
Day" ceremonies by Army and ANG units in joint recruiting drive Maj. Gen. 
Juan Davila, Adjutant General of P. R., hosted the varied and colorful event. 



R. 



'OLD SHAKY' 

DOWN TO RIO 



„oger S. Swanson, Travel Editor 
for the Kansas City Star (Mo.) ac- 
companied an Air Force Reserve 
flight crew on a mission they accom- 
plished in May. Below are excerpts 
of his account of that trip as they 
appeared in his newspaper • • • 

Rio de Ja- 
neiro — I 
have just 
been flying down to Rio — the long 
way, in a roaring, rattling, lumbering 
200-mile-an-hour C-124 cargo plane 
of the U. S. Air Force. 

"Old Shaky" as the crew calls the 
big 4-engine C-124, wasn't out to 
break records. It had a particular and 
rather proud assignment: To go to Sao 
Paulo, Brazil (by way of Rio) and 
pick up an X-15 rocket plane and a 
Project Mercury space capsule that 
had been on display at a Brazilian 
aeronautical exhibition. This task 
was turned over to the 442nd Troop 
Carrier Wing at Richard-Gebaur 
AFB, Kansas City, Mo. 

Lt. Col. Douglas Jenkins, a tele- 
phone company executive, headed the 
crew of Reservists who had been tem- 
porarily ordered to active duty to fly 
the Globemaster south. His co-pilot 
was C apt. Richard Garbrink, a corn 
and cattle farmer from Paxton, Neb. 

v you won't find this old bird 
exactly like the Boeing 707," the 
Colonel explained. "It's big and noisy. 
Bui Us a fine airplane. We just call 



it Old Shaky because it shakes." 

We departed Richards-Gebaur on 
a Sunday morning, then stopped at 
Detroit, Mich., to pick up Col. C. U. 
True, an officer making the trip. 

Shortly after we were airborne, I 
came to have a new respect for these 
Air Force civilian Reservists. At the 
drop of a hat, they seem to have a 
marvelous capacity for switching from 
civilian clothing and jobs to Air Force 
discipline and the rigorous require- 
ments of modern military aviation. 
This kind of skill and dedication al- 
ways has stood the nation well in time 
of emergency (the 442nd, itself, was 
called to duty during the Korean and 
Cuban crises). When you consider 
these men voluntarily give up their 
weekends, and often, their vacations 
you get a picture of devotion. The 
small extra income they receive is 
hardly worth the time sacrifice. 

Colonel Jenkins discussed the 
camaraderie of Air Force Reservists. 
"We all feel a certain sense of achieve- 
ment and comradeship," he com- 
mented. "As Reservists we believe, 
too, we have an unusual obligation 
and responsibility." 

Capt. Elwin Elswood, an architect, 
and Maj. Burl G. McCanless, a 
draftsman, served as navigators on 
the trip. Other crew members in- 
cluded Sgt. Sam Russell, Sgt. Girardo 
Gandini, Airman Jesse Smith, and 
Sgt. James Taylor. 

After Detroit, Old Shaky headed 



for Charleston, S. C. and an ov 
night stop. The next morning we to 
off for a 6-hour overwater leg 
Ramey AFB, Puerto Rico. 

The next day provided a real ti 
We left Ramey AFB, Puerto Rj 
at 9 o'clock. It was 1 5 hours of n 
stop flying before we landed for 
night at Recife, Brazil. 

But next morning, the final lei 
Sao Paulo proved an unusual tn 
The plane paralleled the coast 
South America, flying over such ci 
as Vitoria and Salvador. A pai 
cloud cover obscured the coast, bu 
we approached Rio, the sky ope 
and one of the world's magnifu 
cities unfolded below. The spectao 
Christ statue of the harbor, sill 
etted against a white cloud b; 
ground, stood out splendidly. So 
Sugar Loaf and the wall of i 
scrapers at Cocacabana Beach. 

Now, Sao Paulo loomed only 
miles ahead. Another spectac 
horizon, massive blocks of 
scrapers surpassing even Chica] 
Touching down at Gongonhas 
port, the C-124 attracted wide ai 
tion. By far, it was the monste 
all civilian and military craft tl 
Old Shaky was secured for 
days. On the return trip, new pa; 
gers would be aboard, the X-15 
the capsule, to be held in the ] 
of the great whale of a cargo plar 



C 



_/ apt. Floyd E. Sageser, an 

F o j c e Reservist with the 24 
AFRes Sector, Belton, Mo., furn 
the following description of a I 
MATS trans-Atlantic medical 
uation flight in which Air Force 
servists participated • • • 

The 
TRANS-ATLANTIC F 1 1 

AIR EVACUATION ~"f ' 

CO d.S 

was a dark mass in the distan 
the crew of the Military Air 7. 
port Service C-135B jet transpo 
gan its descent procedures frorr 
000 feet in preparation for a la 
at McGuire AFB, N. J. In the 
cabin a flurry of activity beg: 
blankets were tucked in, litter 
tightened, medical supplies se< 
and personal effects collected. 

The MATS jet was one of ai 
four such aircraft to cross the Ai 
and Pacific oceans each week as 
medical evacuation aircraft, 
in the rear cabin were sick ai 
jured servicemen, dependents, 
partment of Defense employees 
medical evacuation crews reti 
them to the US for treatment. 



>art of that nursing crew were 
Air Force Reservists — members 

36th Aeromedical Evacuation 
ron at Richards-Gebaur AFB, 
who had volunteered for seven 
Df active duty. 1st Lt. James 
nderson, a male nurse, SSgt. 
; E. Webb and A2C Stanley 
oldman, medical technicians, 
Hearing the end of an unusual 
our which had taken them half- 
iround the world. Its purpose 
d orientate them in the latest 
evacuation techniques and for 
to assist an active duty evacu- 
team in caring for a plane load 
iical evacuees. 

: Reservists were the 40th crew 
• Reservists and Air National 
smen to participate in this 
ig program since it was organ- 
)y MATS Eastern Air Force 
[uarters last August. A total 

Reserve and ANG units are 
pating in the program. 

three trainees reported to Mc- 
AFB, where they were briefed 
. Col. Sara K. Neese, chief 
AF flight nurse, 
iring the regular course of our 
'e medical unit training, we 

that many of our Reservists 
nly limited contact with real 
ts. By allowing them to work 
air active duty crews on these 
they have an excellent oppor- 

to observe patients who are 
sly ill. They also can learn the 
: the latest special equipment 
1 the aircraft," said Col. Neese. 
;r, the three men arrived at 
■Main Air Base, Frankfurt, 
iny, after a 7 hour, 10 minute 
aboard a C-135A, which also 
16 tons of assorted cargo, 
fternoon, Lieutenant Anderson 
sd to the 1454th Aeromedical 



Evacuation Squadron where he was 
briefed on aeromedical evacuation 
procedures. Sergeant Webb and Air- 
man Goldman were also briefed. 

Early next morning Lieutenant An- 
derson was picked up at his quarters 
by the two nurses with whom he 
would work on the homeward flight, 
Senior Nurse, Capt. Happy Taketa 
and 1st Lt. Geraldine Bendickson. 

The next morning the two enlisted 
Reservists assisted in the conversion 
of a C-135B from passenger con- 
figuration to passenger and litter in- 
terior to accommodate both ambula- 
tory and stretcher cases. 

At approximately 10 a.m. the pa- 
tients began to board, first those who 
were ambulatory; then the litter cases. 
Last litter case aboard was an Army 
paratroop captain who was almost 
completely paralyzed from a head in- 
jury. He was Lieutenant Anderson's 
responsibility on the homeward flight. 

At 11 a.m., the big jet was air- 
borne and the Reservists went to 
work. Medication for several of the 
patients continued during the eight 
hour flight, litters had to be remade 
and hot meals served. 



RESERVE NEWS 

IN BRIEF 



Promo- 
tions of 

a p p r ox- 
imately 650 Reserve 2nd lieutenants 
to 1st lieutenant will be considered 
by a Board convening at the Air Re- 
serve Records Center August 5-6. 
Eligibility requires a June 30, 1961 
(or before) promotion service date 
and being in an active status . . . 
Flying Safety awards were recently 
presented two Air Force Reserve 
troop carrier wings. Recipients were 
the 349th, Hamilton AFB, Calif., with 
almost 20,000 accident-free hours, 
and the 435th, Homestead, Fla., with 



over 14,000 hours. Air Force Re- 
serve's total accident rate for 1962 
was 2.9 percent per 100,000 hours, 
and Air National Guard's was 7.85. 

The 166th TFSq., Ohio ANG, re- 
ceived the Frank P. Lahm Air Safety 
trophy for the 18-month period end- 
ing Dec. 1962, which included Berlin 
crisis active duty flights. The trophy 
is named for Brig. Gen. Lahm (Ret.) 
who is one of two living aviators 
trained by the Wright brothers . . . 
Thirty-three aircraft from two Air 
Force Reserve troop carrier wings 
were used by over 1,000 Catholic 
paratroopers who took part in this 
year's annual St. Michael's Society 
jump at Ft. Bragg, N.C. on May 25. 
The planes were from the 445th at 
Dobbins AFB, Ga., and the 446th 
at Ellington AFB, Tex. 

Air Force Reserve units throughout 
the nation received another stimulus 
last month aimed at bolstering their 
recruiting efforts through a new "Try 
One" enlistment program. Under Air 
Force Reserve's Try One program, 
enlistments for periods of one year 
are now authorized, and former serv- 
icemen from any branch of the armed 
forces or from the reserve components 
are permitted to enlist for a one year 
period trial basis and at the rank held 
while on active duty, provided the re- 
enlistment takes place within one year 
of release from active duty. 

Previously only enlistments of three, 
four, or five years were permissible. 
Individuals may take advantage of the 
new concept, just once, if they have 
completed their military obligation. 

The program, originally adopted by 
the Air National Guard and the sub- 
ject of special consideration by the 
Air Reserve Forces policy committee, 
hopes for full manning soon. 



Lend Helping Hand 



People to People banner presented 
zilian officials by Roger Swanson, 
author of "Old Shaky" story (pg. 6) 
dmired by Reservist, Lt. Col. Doug- 
Jenkins, (c) aircraft commander dur- 

flight, and Forrest McCluney, pres- 
nt of Kansas City's People to People 
ncil. © Seriously injured patient 
ube fed by Reserve 1st Lt. James 
Jerson (c) and nurse, 1st Lt. Geral- 
e Bendickson, during recent MATS 
Jical evac flight from Germany to 
led States. (Story pg. 6-7) 




Mr. Benjamin W. 

FRIDGE 



Special Assistant (Man- 
power, Personnel and 
Reserve Forces.) Mr. 
Fridge is an AFRes 
Brig. Gen. with a mo- 
bilization assignment as 
Deputy to the Com- 
mander, Hq. Command, 
Boiling AFB, D. C. 



Mr. John A. 

LANG 



Deputy for Reserve and 
ROTC Affairs. Mr. Lang 
is an AFRes Brig. Gen. 
with a mobilization as- 
signment as Deputy 
Commandant, Hq., 
AFROTC, Air Univer- 
sity, Maxwell AFB, 
Alabama. 




a voice in Policy 



America's military posture is linked firmly to 

the individual and joint policy decisions 

of the several services and their Reserve components. 



In each of the first three issues o 
The AIR RESERVIST for 1963, a 
article was devoted to explaining th. 
Reserve Forces' policy making pro. 
ess. At Department of Defense levt 
both the Reserve Forces Policy Boar. 
(Jan. '63) and the Office of the As- 
sistant Secretary of Defense/Mar 
power (Feb. '63) screen and evak 
ate proposals and advise the Secretin 
of Defense on Reserve policy matter: 
The Air Reserve Forces Policy Con. 
mittee (Mar./ Apr. '63) performs ; 
function within the Department of th. 
Air Force which is similar to that a 
the Reserve Forces Policy Board. 

In this issue, we discuss the n 
sponsibilities of the Office of the 5« 
retary of the Air Force and of th 
Headquarters USAF Staff. 



J_ he Secretary of the Air Forci 
has designated the Under Secretary o 
the Air Force as the statutory ap 
pointee responsible for Reserv 
Forces matters as required by la» 
(Dr. Brockway McMillan has bee 
nominated to be Under Secretary c 
the Air Force to replace Dr. Josep 
V. Charyk who resigned effectiv 
March 1, 1963.) Working closel 
with the Under Secretary are two ei 
perts on Reserve affairs: Mr. Benjj 
min W. Fridge, special assistant fc 
manpower, personnel and Resen 
Forces, and his Deputy for Resen 
and ROTC, Mr. John A. Lang, Jr. 

These gentlemen (both brigadif 
generals in the Air Force Resent 
review not only the recommendatior 
of the Air Reserve Forces Polk 
Committee but also proposed actiot 
by the Air Staff which affect the A 
National Guard and Air Force R 
serve. Their advice, based on acth 
duty military experience and in tl 
Reserve Forces, plus intimate know 
edge of current programs and prol 
lems, provides a foundation for dec 
sions by the Secretary and Und< 
Secretary. Among their many respoi 
sibilities, they represent the Seer 
tary on various boards and commi 
tees dealing with the Reserve Fore 
and before Congressional committee 
They also maintain close liaison ai 
meet with the various non-milita 
organizations which are interested 
Reserve Forces programs. 

Although Mr. Fridge and Mr. Lai 
are the Secretary's principal advise 



Maj. Gen. C. R. 

LOW 



Directly responsible to 
Air Force's Chief of 
Staff, Maj. Gen. Curtis 
Low insures the appli- 
cation of the "Total 
Force" concept as it is 
applied to the Air Na- 
tional Guard and Air 
Force Reserve. 




Reserve matters, the total force 
;ept of the Air Force mandates 
interest in Reserve affairs by all 
ions of the Department of the Air 
:e. Thus, you will find that the 
stant secretary for materiel, the 
sral counsel, the director of in- 
lation and all the other members 
le Office of the Secretary are vital- 
nterested in those aspects of the 
erve Forces program which fall 
lin their areas of responsibility. 
he Chief of Staff also has a prin- 
.1 advisor on Reserve matters, the 
istant Chief of Staff for Reserve 
:es, Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low. 
hin the Air Staff, however, even 
e than in the Office of the Secre- 
, the total force concept dictates 
management concept. The Chief 
taff has directed that the Air Staff 
: on and treat the Air Reserve 
:es the same as it does the active 
r units and, as nearly as possible, 
;ct the same rapid response from 
n. It is therefore imperative that 
is, policies, and programs for the 
National Guard and Air Force 
erve be in consonance with those 
the active force. They must be 
doped concurrently by the same 



agencies, and with the same emphasis. 

Each deputy chief of staff and di- 
rector is responsible to the Chief of 
Staff for developing and coordinating 
throughout the staff those policies, 
plans, programs, and procedures for 
the Reserve Forces which fall within 
his functional area. Each also must 
accomplish normal staff actions in 
support of Reserve programs and the 
Civil Air Patrol. In other words, he 
does for the Reserve Forces exactly 
what he does for the active duty force. 

Offices which are constantly and 
deeply involved in Reserve matters 
utilize the services of Reserve ad- 
visers. These are ANG and AFRes 
officers assigned for four year tours 
under Section 8033 and 265 of Title 
10, U. S. Code (See "Openings," p. 
2, May 1963 AIR RESERVIST). 
Their job is to provide on-the-spot 
knowledge of Reserve Forces prob- 
lems and capabilities and to assure 
that these factors are considered in 
all actions affecting Reserve programs. 

The Assistant Chief of Staff for Re- 
serve Forces (General Low) constant- 
ly analyzes and evaluates the broad 
policies developed by the Air Staff 
to insure that they are consistent with 
overall objectives and give considera- 
tion to the special problems of the 
Reserve Forces. He acts as the final 
coordinating authority for the Chief 
of Staff on policies concerning over- 
all concepts, mission assignments, 
personnel, utilization, and force struc- 
ture for the Air National Guard and 
the Air Force Reserve. He assures 
that these policies are effectively im- 
plemented by the functional areas of 
the Air Staff and maintains continu- 
ing surveillance over the mission cap- 
abilities and readiness of the Air Re- 
serve Forces. 

Since he is the coordinator, re- 
viewer, and appraiser for the Chief 
of Staff, he must have a voice in the 
development of policy. He therefore 
attends meetings of the Air Staff 
Board and the Air Force Council 
when Reserve matters are being con- 
sidered, and provides advisers to com- 
mittees and panels of the Air Staff 
Board. He makes certain that his 
office is represented on all working 
groups for systems involving the Air 
Reserve Forces. 

In the legislative field, he provides 
support witnesses for posture hearings 
and for defense of appropriation re- 
quests for Air Reserve Forces support. 
He coordinates with Air Staff action 
offices in preparing and supporting 
legislation applicable to the Air Re- 
serve Forces and the Civil Air Patrol. 

The Assistant Chief of Staff for 



Reserve Forces also represents the 
Air Force as a member of the Reserve 
Forces Policy Board (Office of the 
Secretary of Defense) and maintains 
close liaison with the Air Reserve 
Forces Policy Committee. He serves 
as the Air Staff point of contact with 
the National Guard Bureau, Conti- 
nental Air Command, and the war- 
time gaining commands on matters of 
broad policy relating to the Air Re- 
serve Forces. 

In the public affairs field, he repre- 
sents the Chief of Staff in relations 
with non-service organizations hav- 
ing primary interest in Air Reserve 
Forces matters. He coordinates all 
information programs and policies 
pertinent to the Air Reserve Forces 
and maintains close liaison with the 
Director of Information, USAF, and 
the information offices of the National 
Guard Bureau and CONAC. 

The manning authorization for the 
office of the Assistant Chief of Staff 
for Reserve Forces is 15. This in- 
cludes ten officers, three of whom are 
ANG 8033 and 265 officers and three 
who are Air Force Reserve 8033 
and 265 officers. 

Recent changes in the organiza- 
tion and functions of the office are 
designed to produce more positive 
control of Reserve programs and to 
identify more clearly the responsibili- 
ties of deputies and directors of the 
Air Staff. Heretofore, responsibility 
for actions on various Reserve Forces 
matters had been assigned partly to 
the office of the Assistant Chief of 
Staff for Reserve Forces and partly 
to other Air Staff agencies. There 
was no clear cut "home" for many 
types of actions. The Assistant Chief 
of Staff for Reserve Forces has now 
been relieved of these detailed oper- 
ating functions in order to concentrate 
his efforts on major policy matters 
which have far reaching implications 
for the Air Reserve Forces. Each 
agency in the Air Staff now has a de- 
finitive responsibility for Reserve mat- 
ters which corresponds to its re- 
sponsibility for active force matters. 

The total force concept requires 
that Air Reserve Forces be a ready, 
responsible part of total Air Force 
power. It demands that Air Reserve 
Forces capabilities be used wherever 
they can make the maximum contri- 
bution to Air Force effectiveness, 
across the entire spectrum of Air 
Force missions. 

The Air Reserve Forces manage- 
ment structure is tailored to support 
the total force concept — to insure 
the proper and full utilization of Air 
Reserve Forces capabilities. 



m 



■ 



•>\&*0> 




REPORT FROM WASHINGTON 

The following bills (all favorable to members of 
the Reserve Forces) are currently before the 88th 
Congress awaiting action or have been proposed by 
the Air Force or DOD. 

H.R. 2500. Would equalize the treatment of Reserves 
and Regulars in the payment of per diem. It would 
amend the Career Compensation Act so that the term 
"permanent station" may also include the home of a 
member. It would permit payment of per diem to 
Reservists under circumstances such as: service on 
boards away from home; advance parties making 
arrangements for annual training encampments; at- 
tending service schools; participating in airlift mis- 
sions, fire-power demonstrations and air rescue mis- 
sions, as well as others. Awaiting DOD coordination. 

AFLI 1429. Establishes the Reserve Emergency Service 
Medal. To be awarded to Reserves of the Armed Forces 
who, after Sept. 25, 1961, are involuntarily ordered 
to active duty during periods of international tension 
or crisis. Awaits DOD coordination. 

H.R. 4241. Provides additional flexibility, uniformity, 
and equity within the Reserve enlistment program. 
This would be achieved by fixing the minimum period 
of active duty for training at not less than four months 
and leaving the maximum to be determined by the 
training necessary to qualify the individual in his 
specialty. It would provide the Reserve Forces with 
one standard military service obligation of six years 
for all who enlisted between the ages of 17-26. Non- 
prior service personnel between the above ages, who 
became members of the Reserve and National Guard, 
would be deferred from induction under the .UMTSA, 
contingent upon satisfactory participation. Awaits 
House Armed Services Committee approval. 

H.R. 4271. Would amend and clarify re-employment 
provisions of the Universal Military Training and 
Service Act. It assures that Reservists are not denied 
employment, retention in employment, promotion, or 
any other incident or advantage of employment be- 
cause of current or future obligation to serve in the 
Armed Forces. Awaits House Armed Services Com- 
mittee action. 

DOD 88-9. Authorizes a program of less than four 
years duration for the ROTC. It would authorize mili- 
tary departments to continue their present four-year 
ROTC programs or establish programs of less than 
four academic years in civilian colleges and universi- 
ties. It establishes two-year officer education programs 



and makes it possible for all sophomores in universi- 
ties, colleges, and junior colleges to compete for 
admission. Scholarships and allowances for a maxi- 
mum of $1,300 per year would be authorized during 
junior and senior years. Indoctrination program remains 
unchanged. In DOD coordination. 

H.R. 2501. Provides permanent authorization for the 
promotion of qualified Reserve officers of the Army 
and Air Force to existing unit vacancies, including 
general officer grades. In DOD coordination. 

DOD 88-64 (Similar to H.R. 2503). Authorizes medical 
and dental care for dependents of Reservists who die 
while on active duty for 30 days or less from an 
injury incurred or aggravated while on inactive duty 
training. Present law entitles these dependents to such 
benefits only if death is a result of injury or disease 
incurred while on a tour of active duty for more than 
30 days. Awaiting clearance by the Bureau of Budget. 

H.R. 2509. Authorizes Reserve officers to combine 
service in more than one Reserve component in com- 
puting the four years of satisfactory Federal service 
necessary to qualify for the uniform maintenance 
allowance. In DOD coordination. 

H.R. 220. Relates to the conversion of national service 
life insurance to a new modified life plan. Affects 
Reservists who have NSLI. Its provisions include: con- 
tinuance of the policy at a level rate of premium; at 
age 65 the face value of the policy would automati- 
cally be reduced by one-half without a reduction in 
premium; an option to maintain other half by paying 
the additional premium rate for that age group, no 
medical examination required. In DOD coordination. 

H.R. 2505. Amends titles 10 and 32 of the U.S.C. to 
provide benefits for nonregular members of the Armed 
Forces and members of the National Guard disabled 
from disease. It grants the same hospital and medical 
care, pay and allowances, and other benefits for 
members of the Guard or Reserve who contract or 
aggravate a disease in line of duty. It also provides the 
same benefits to those who are injured in line of duty 
while proceeding directly to or from inactive duty 
training or active duty as they would receive were the 
injury incurred during a scheduled period of training 
or duty. In DOD coordination. 

H.R. 2504. Amends titles 10 and 32, U.S.C. with re- 
spect to technicians of the National Guard. Makes the 
Federal Civil Service Retirement Act applicable to 
them and brings them within the purview of the 
Federal Employees' Group Life Insurance Act of 1954, 
as amended, and the Federal Employees' Health Bene- 
fits Act of 1959. In DOD coordination. 



ID: To identify officer grades listed below, 0-2 stands for First Lieutenant, 0-3 for Captain, and 0-4 for Major. Enlisted: The AFSC identifies both the 
d the skill'level. As an example, the #5 in 72150 indicates openings for Staff Sergeants and Airmen First Class in the Information career field. Simi- 
#9 refers to Chief and Senior Master Sergeants, and #7 to Master and Technical Sergeants. 



-nonth's "Help Wanted" section is devoted to Air National Guard's TRY ONE recruiting drive, the 113th Tactical Fighter Wing 
j) at Andrews AFB, Md., Air Force Reserve's Mobile Communication Squadrons and their Detachments, and the 302nd TCWg., 
in County AFB, Wilmington, Ohio. Positions offer up to 48- paid drHls, a 15-day tour of active duty annually, retirement points' 
ossible promotion. Applicants should write directly to unit of choice, giving full name, address, grade and Air Force Specialty Code. 



mmunications — AFRes 

11th Mobile Comm. Sq., 
Scott AFB, III. 



FFICER 
! Grade No. 
0-3 1 

ILISTED 

: No. 

5 
B 1 

3 



29150 
29370 
29350 
30371 
30471 
30474 
36370 
42173 



#1, 11th Mobile Comm. Sq. 
Selfridge AFB, Mich. 



FICER 

Grade No. 
0-3 1 

0-2 1 



ENLISTED 
AFSC No 

27250B 

27270 

30371 

36350 

42173 



it. #2, 11th Mbl Comm Sq., 
lichards-Gebaur AFB, Mo. 



'FICER 

Grade No. 
0-3 1 

0-2 1 



ENLISTED 

AFSC No. 

27250A 1 

27250B 2 

27270 4 

30371 1 

30474 1 



t. #3, 11th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Off utt AFB, Nebr. 



LISTED 

: No. 

B 1 

2 
1 



30371 
30451 
30474 
42173 



it #4, 11th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Suffolk County AFB, N.Y. 



LISTED 

No. 

A 1 
B 2 

5 



30351 
30371 
36350 
64650 



it #5, 11th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Davis-Monthan AFB, Ariz. 



FICER 

Grade No. 
0-3 1 



ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

27250A 2 

27250B 2 

27270 2 



it #6, 11th Mbl Comm Sq., 
/right-Patterson AFB, Ohio 



"FICER 
: Grade No. 

0-3 1 



ENLISTED 

AFSC No. 

27250A 2 

27250B 2 

30351 1 

30371 1 

30454 1 



it #7, 11th Mbl Comm Sq., 
March AFB, Calif. 



'FICER 
: Grade No. 
0-2 1 

LISTED 

A 1 



27270 
29350 
30351 
30371 
36350 
42173 



Communications - AFRes 

12th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Mather AFB, Calif. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

1634B 0-4 1 

1634B 0-3 1 

6424 0-2 1 



ENLISTED 



AFSC 

27250B 

27270 

29170 

30371 

30471 

30474 



No. 

2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 



Det #1, 12th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Hill AFB, Utah 



ENLISTED 30351 

AFSC No. 30371 

27250B 1 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

3034 0-2 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

27250B 2 



27270 
30351 
30371 
30474 
36350 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

1634B 0-3 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

27250A 1 



27250B 

27270 

30371 

36350 

42153 



ENLISTED 27270 

AFSC No. 30371 

27250B 2 42153 



Det #6, 12th Mbl Cokir 
March AFB, Calif. 



Sq-, 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

1634B 0-3 1 

3034 0-2 1 



Det #2, 12th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Travis AFB, Calif. 

ENLISTED 30351 1 

AFSC No. 30371 1 

27250B 2 30474 1 

27270 4 

Det #3, 12th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Fairchild AFB, Wash. 



Det #4, 12th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Luke AFB, Ariz. 



Det #5, 12th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Hamilton AFB, Calif. 



ENLISTED 



AFSC 

27250A 

27250B 

27270 

30351 

30371 



No. 
1 
1 
5 
1 
1 



13th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Tinker AFB, Okla*. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

7324 0-2 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

27250A 1 
27250B 2 
27270 5 
29150 4 



29170 

29370 

30171B 

30371 

30474 

36350 

36370 

42173 

64650 



Communications — AFRes 

Det #7, 12th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Luke AFB, Ariz. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

1634B 0-3 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

27250A 1 
27250B 2 



27270 
29370 
30371 
30454 
30474 
36350 
42153 



Det #1, 13th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Bergstrom AFB, Tex. 



ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

27250A 1 

27250B 1 



27270 
29370 
42153 



Det #2, 13th Mbl Comm Sq., 
James Connally AFB, Tex. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

3034 0-2 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

27250B 2 



27270 
30371 
30451 
30454 
36350 
42153 



Det #3, 13th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Hunter AFB, Ga. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

3034 0-2 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

27250A 2 



27250B 

27270 

30351 

30371 

30451 

64650 



Det #4, 13th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Kelly AFB, Tex. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

1634B 0-3 1 

3034 0-2 1 



ENLISTED 

AFSC No. 

27250A 1 

27250B 1 

27270 4 

30454 1 

36350 1 



Det #5, 13th Mbl Comm Sq., 
Bates Fid, Mobile, Ala. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

3034 0-2 1 

ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

27250B 2 



27270 
29350 
30351 
30454 
30474 



Det #6, 13th Mbl Comm Sq., 
MacDill AFB, Fla. 



ENLISTED 27270 

AFSC No. 30351 

27250A 2 30371 

27250B 2 42153 



Det #7, Mbl Comm Sq., 
Robins AFB, Ga. 



ENLISTED 
AFSC No. 

27250A 2 
27250B 2 
27270 5 



30371 
36370 
36350 
42153 



Tactical Fighters — ANG 

113th TacFtr Wg, ANG 
Andrews AFB, Md. 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 

1435A 0-3» 1 

1435Z 0-3» 2 

1115BO-2* 11 



1334 0-3» 
6444A 0-2 
9754 0-3 
9926 0-4 
2524 0-2/3 



* Must be rated, jet qualified and on 
flying status. 



ENLISTED 



AFSC 

00350 

24 170 A 

24270 

25251 

25271 

25370 

27170 

29150 

29170 

30151B 

30171 

30171B 

30474 

36150 

36250 

40370 

42133 

42153 

42251 

42353A 

42373A 

42450 

43131A 

43131C 

43151C 

43230 

46131 

46150 

46170 

46171 

46270 

47131 

47151 



No. 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
16 
4 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 



47153 

53250 

53350 

53430 

53450 

54450Z 

55250 

55251 

55270 

56370 

56550 

56570 

57130 

57150 

57170 

58250 

60251 

60270 

60351 

64350 

64250A 

64370A 

64670 

64750 

65150 

67151 

67153 

67170 

68370 

70250 

77130 

90252 

90650 

90850 

92250A 



I 



TRY ONE - ANG 

Prior-service men, to age 57, can 
reenlist with the Air National Guard 
for a one-year trial period or for 
three or six years, at the grade they 
previously held and for the period 
of the enlistment contract. Prior 
service required varies with the ap- 
plicant's age, as follows: 

Under 36: none 

36 — under 38: one year 

38 — under 41: two years 

41 — under 58: two years plus the 
number of years the applicant is 
over age 40. 

For details, visit local ANG unit. 



Troop Carrier — AFRes 

The 302nd TCWg, Clinton County 
AFB, Wilmington, Ohio, is seeking 
160 new members by June 30. Open- 
ings exist in almost every career 
field for both officers and enlisted 
men. For information, write the unit 
or call Area code 513, 382-3811, 
ext. 3103. 



11 



One of many entertainers to get appreciation 

awards for contributions to "Guard Sessions" is singer 

Keely Smith. Maj. Gen. Henry McMillan, National 

Guard's Adjutant General of Florida, makes presentation. 



THE 

"TRY ONE" 
COMPETITION 





12 



FINISH JUNE 30th 



START FEB. 1st 



H 



VETERANS 

ALL TRY 1 YEAR £//4/W 

\WC¥¥€S MAIR GUARDS' 

wmmmu Hmmmum 



j 



165th Air Transport Gp., Savannah, Ga., used 
irk benches for Try One recruiting exposure. 







r National Guard's "Try One" 
liting drive has rolled into high 
The total efforts of Try One's 
nal as well as internal promoters 
achieved comparatively startling 
ts. With an ultimate objective of 
lg a minimum of 5,000 (mostly 

service) members to its rolls 
jne 30, 1963, the Try One cam- 
l is getting the professional sup- 
of many prominent figures in the 
tainment world. 

le National Guard plans to pre- 
awards to 20 well-known enter- 
rs who have donated their time 
talents to promoting the Guard 
^cording issues of "Guard Ses- 
" the radio show distributed by 
National Guard Bureau to over 
) stations across the country, 
aj. Gen. D. W. McGowan, chief 
; National Guard Bureau, kicked 
tie program several months ago 
>resenting an award to singer 
i Lawrence on a TV program. 
Gen. Henry W. McMillan, ad- 
t general of Florida, presented 
/ Smith's award to her on her 
ing night at a hotel in Miami 
h. Maj. Gen. James A. May, 
ant general of Nevada, honored 
leader "Tex" Beneke, singer Ray 
le, and the Modernaires before 
) people at a popular club in 

Tahoe, Nevada. Brig. Gen. 
ild J. Strait, commander, 108th 
ical Fighter Wing, presented 
dy Herman with his Guardsman 
rd during the bandleader's ap- 
ince at McGuire AFB, New Jer- 
in April. 

her entertainers scheduled for 
ntations in the coming months 
de Delia Reese, Duke Ellington, 
l Vaughan, Paul Weston, Jo 



Stafford, Nelson Riddle, Anita Bry- 
ant, Les Brown, Andy Williams and 
Skitch Henderson. 

Internally, the Try One recruiting 
campaign is being carried on in a 
variety of methods. Open Houses 
have been held, Buddy Days spon- 
sored, motivational materials pro- 
duced and distributed locally and na- 
tionally, and innumerable face-to-face 
meetings initiated. 

An excellent example of what Air 
Guard units are doing all over the 
country is evidenced by Georgia 
ANG's 165th Air Transport Group, 
Travis Field, Savannah. The con- 
solidated efforts of all the members 
has resulted in some unusual ap- 
proaches to their quest for Try One 
exposure. Besides normal methods 
such as pamphlets, posters, brochures, 
releases to news media, radio and TV 
spot announcements, the members 
have built new back rests for some of 
Savannah's park benches. Naturally, 
the new backs carry eye-catching let- 
tering aimed at veterans and the Try 
One program. The unit's recruiting 
buses now carry a similar message. 
Savannah's trash cans have even 
joined the Try One effort — they too 
are spreading the message. But, one 
of the more unusual phases of this 
unit's effort is a personal sacrifice in- 
volving the group's maintenance 
squadron commander, Maj. Charles 
E. Miller, Jr. The major has agreed 
to walk~ one mile for every prior- 
service man recruited by his squadron 
personnel. A by-product of Major 
Miller's daring vow came in the form 
of local newspaper publicity as re- 
porters explained to their readers the 
reason for the agreement. 

Such are the endeavors of but one 



ANG unit. Multiply these by the 
number of Air Guard units and you 
have some indication as to how they 
have achieved such outstanding re- 
sults. Since the Try One total effort 
commenced in mid-February the fol- 
lowing official figures have been com- 
piled by ANG's personnel division: 
By the end of February the Air 
Guard's rolls showed a net gain (over 
and above normal attritional losses) 
of 328; at the end of March the figure 
for the month was 1 ,344, and through- 
out April it was 1,401. Some 3,073 
members had been added to the pre- 
campaign figure, meaning about 61 
percent of the goal had been achieved. 

To stimulate interstate interest and 
at the same time to apprise each of 
the 52 participants (the 50 States, 
Puerto Rico and D.C.) of each other's 
results, the Guard Bureau's personnel 
division has likened the Try One drive 
to a steeplechase horse race. Under 
the direction of Mr. Raymond J. Hig- 
gins, the air personnel division sends a 
letter each month to all the adjutants 
general, informing them of the current 
standing (track position) of their par- 
ticular "horse" since it left the post 
on February 1. This figure is based 
on the percentage of the required to- 
tal net gain the state has attained 
during the previous month. Each of 
the 52 competitors was assigned a 
specific number of persons to add to 
its on-board count, depending on how 
many recruits it needed to reach au- 
thorized (UMD) strength. The final 
date (finish line) is June 30. 

Where ANG's Steeplechase devi- 
ates from reality is in the fact that 
every "horse" can and is expected to 
be a winner, and the month of June 
may prove this to be true. 









^■1 



CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS 



Air Reserve officer participation 
with the Civil Air Patrol has in- 
creased at an annual rate of about 
20 percent since 1960. Last year 
more than 24,000 manhours were ex- 
pended by 368 Reservists and the in- 
crease is expected to continue. 

The 1963 summer encampments 
are expected to draw the largest num- 
ber of CAP cadets in recent years 
—more than 9,000 at 35 Air Force 
installations throughout the country. 
The summer program will begin 
the first two weeks in June with the 
Alaska Wing encampment at El- 
mendorf AFB, Anchorage. 

As CAP cadet activities increase, 
so does the opportunity for Air Re- 
servists to join the training program. 
"Instructing the young cadet can 
be a rewarding and interesting ex- 
perience," Col. James H. Isbell, chief 
of staff, Continental Air Command, 
stated recently. 

Colonel Isbell said that Reservists 
with teaching experience are especi- 
ally needed. He said that Part III 
Reservists, those nonaffiliated with 
Reserve units, may also be awarded 
points toward retirement in connec- 
tion with administration, liaison and 
maintenance duties. 

Aerospace education workshops 
for teachers is another field of co- 
operative effort by CAP and Air 
Force Reserve programs. The num- 
ber of workshops is expected to rise 
to 150 in 1963. 

Air Reserve activity with CAP is 
not limited to individual Reservists 
earning points in the training pro- 
gram. Reservist aircrews of C-119's 
and C123's in various sections of the 
nation are scheduled to airlift cadets 
and seniors for encampments. 

In addition to the accelerated Re- 
serve support, the "big lift" is yet 
to come this summer. Air Force, AF- 
CAP liaison aircraft, MATS, and 
Air Force-chartered commercial air- 
liners will fly more than K00 selected 
cadets and escorts participating dur- 
ing June, July and August. 

' on the schedule of national 
events is the Federal Aviation Agency 
Orientation Course, June 23-29 at 
the 1AA Academy, Will Rogers 



Field, Oklahoma City. Here, like the 
three other orientation courses, one 
honor cadet from each of CAP's 52 
wings is selected to attend. The FAA 
course offers indoctrination in air 
traffic management, air navigation 
and flight standards. 

The CAP International Air Cadet 
Exchange with 21 countries this year 
will be held during the period from 
July 14 through August 9. Canada, 
Great Britain and countries of conti- 
nental Europe, the Near East and 
South America will exchange 135 
cadets plus senior escorts for each 
group with the CAP. Rhein-Main Air 
Base, Germany, is the central dis- 
semination point. CAP cadets, flown 
there by MATS from Andrews AFB, 
Md., will be taken over by their host 
nations. The returning MATS planes 
will bring the foreign cadets to New 
York City before they disperse to 
CAP wings for about ten days. 

The Jet Orientation Course, July 
21-27, at Perrin AFB, Tex., con- 
sists of 16 hours of academic train- 
ing plus flying instruction. Both 
phases are taught by primary duty 
USAF instructors. Each of the 52 
cadets fly several hours in T-33 jets 
as part of the regular orientation. 

The event involving the most ca- 
dets,, both boys and girls, is the Na- 
tional Drill Competition to be held 
August 5-9. There will be eleven 
teams competing, one from each of 



the eight regions. Also, teams fn 
Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. 1 
Air Force moves the 275 cadets i 
escorts to and from the U. S. , 
Force Academy, Colorado Sprir 
Colo., for the event. 

Maxwell AFB, Ala., is the site 
the annual Aerospace Age Orier 
tion Course, the only national coi 
for girls only. The cadettes are 
lected on the same basis as the 
dets for the other events — one fi 
each CAP wing. This course is m 
up of briefings and demonstrati 
on world affairs, Air Force care 
fire power, intelligence, space ei 
ronment and many other aspects 
aerospace that the cadettes will c 
with during their lifetimes. 

The Space Age Orientation Con 
like the FAA course, is to be ( 
ducted for the third time this Au; 
25-31. Special educational reqi 
ments must be met by the 52 I 
and their escorts to cope with 
advanced study of missiles and t 
systems presented by the instruc 
at the Chanute Technical Trail 
Center, 111. 

As Civil Air Patrol grows in 
ture, seeking its goal of 165. 
members-strong by 1967, the 
Force and Air Reservists are d 
their part to shape the destinj 
this volunteer force of trained, a 
space-minded youths and adults 




Civil Air Patrol Cadets from Maine and Vermont Wings get Air Force mi: 
indoctrination during their combined encampment at Loring Atb, Ma 



14 



Soviet advances: A Soviet anti-sub or anti-missile ad- 
ince could upset strategy plans according to Lt. Gen. 
imes H. Doolittle (USAF Ret.). He observed: "Both 
le Soviets and we are striving hard to develop a 
)unter to the submarine and a defense against missiles, 
they were to achieve a substantial capability in these 
eas before we did they would have a distinct military 
ivantage. We would then have to depend, almost en- 
rely, upon our manned bombers to deter nuclear war, 
• to prevail if all-out war was thrust upon us. In this 
ise it would be very important indeed that we have the 
ost modern and effective vehicles and weapons." 

IRECT AIR SUPPORT: Faster Air support system de- 
sed by Air Force. Maj. Gen. S. J. Donovan, deputy 
r operations, Tactical Air Command told an audience 
Cincinnati recently that "the newly devised Direct 
ir Support system will result in faster action in giving 
Dntline ground commanders air firepower when they 
:ed it. Under this system the Forward Air Controller 
-who, I might add, is a jump-qualified tactical fighter 
lot working with the ground troops — is in direct and 
stantaneous contact with the air commander. When he 
lays a strike request back to the air commander, action 
n be taken to direct the necessary air strike within a 
atter of minutes. This answers two vital requirements 
r effective close air support: speed and precision." 

Strongly endorsing STRICOM, General Donovan 
id also that "we in TAC are convinced that the estab- 
hment in 1961 of the U.S. Strike Command was a 
mificant step forward: it is the focal point for the 
velopment, testing and application of air/ground com- 
t doctrine, tactics and techniques. It gives us the 
lifted command structure that is essential to produce 
aximum combat effectiveness, and at the same time 
sure that we take full advantage of the inherent flex- 
ility of tactical airpower in giving the Army the mo- 
lity.it must have." 

FFERING VIEWPOINTS: Public discussion of differ- 
ces among military viewpoints is essential to national 
iderstanding and to our form of government, accord- 
l to Neil E. Harlan, assistant secretary of the Air 
>rce for financial management. Mr. Harlan said: 
"As there has continued, over the years, 
be controversy between the legislative and 
ecutive branches — and within each of those 
anches — especially among the members of 
)ngress — there have also been differences 
opinion within the Department of Defense, 
lere are differences among the Services and 
tween one or more Services and the Office 
the Secretary of Defense. And the pres- 
ce of such differences does not appear a 
specter of particular administrations. . . . 
do not find such disagreement alarming, 
r, in my opinion, should the community at 
"ge. There are other political systems, other 
rms of government which preclude such 
bate; but we are not ready to recommend 



Air Force 

Point 

Of View 



them as a solution. If we reach a point where such 
differences are not brought to the light of public dis- 
cussion, we will have lost an important element in the 
checks and balances which make our total political sys- 
tem feasible. Differences of opinion will exist as long 
as men think about the issues; and if they do not come 
into public scrutiny, they will be settled by other means 
— perhaps less embarrassing means, but perhaps, also, 
less wholesome means. 

"It is difficult enough at best for the intelligent 
man on the street to form an opinion on military issues. 
. . . The open discussion at least makes it possible for 
the Lippmans, the Alsops, the Restons, the Kissingers, 
the Kahns, the Baldwins to form more valid opinions. 
If it does, it also helps the citizen who is trying to have 
an opinion. I, for one, hope the dialogue will continue." 

SPACE COMMAND POST: A command post in space 
may be needed, according to Gen. Thomas S. Power, 
commander in chief of Strategic . Air Command. He 
said: "We may find that, eventually, the only really 
survivable command and control structure — not only 
for SAC but all our military forces — would be one 
employing a maneuverable command post in space. 
Should such a spaceborne command post become neces- 
sary, it would have to be large enough to carry all 
electronic gear required to gather, process and dissemi- 
nate operational information on a global basis. Also, it 
would have to be capable of defending itself against 
any interference or attacks from the ground and space. 
It is inconceivable to operate such a central command 
post, especially one deep in space, without a skilled 
crew to operate and maintain its complex equipment 
and without competent officers fully qualified to assume 
command of the strike forces whenever necessary. Here, 
then, may be the first major requirement for military 
men in space." 

WHAT NEXT: After the B-52, what kind of aircraft 
will be needed? The Secretary of the Air Force answered 
the question: "We can't say now just where we will 
come out, but there doesn't seem to be any question as 
to the value of manned vehicles able to stay aloft for 
long periods, travel very great distances, fly 
high or fly low, and fly fast." 

The Air Force Chief of Staff told a Con- 
gressional committee in February that the 
Air Force was conducting studies on three 
kinds of strategic aircraft besides the XB-70: 
a long endurance missile-launching airplane, 
a plane designed for low-altitude penetration, 
and "a high-altitude type of airplane, sim- 
ilar to the B-70, but using the state of the 
art that has advanced in the last four or five 
years since we started the B-70." He added 
that "we will probably come up with an air- 
plane half the size." This plane, he said, 
would be used for both reconnaissance and 
strike purposes. 



wish every American could understand fully how much is demanded of the modern military 
an . . . Never in history has military science embraced so many fields of knowledge, or de- 
anded the levels of technical competence that it does today. And it is to these professionals 
at we entrust the priceless treasure of our national security." 

Hon. Eugene M. Zuckert/ Secretary of the Air Force 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



USAF Recurring Publication 30- 
No. 30-H-5-63-308,fS84 




RESERVE CAMERA 



Leroy Jackson, well known halfback for the Washington 
Redskins, recently took the oath of enlistment when he became 
a member of Air National Guard's (D.C.) 113th Tactical 
Fighter Wing. Conducting the ceremony was Lt. James E. 
Snight, also prominent in football as an official. I Lt. Gen. 
E. J. Timberlake, commander, CON AC, presents USAF's Fly- 
ing Safety plaque to Col. Bourne Adkison, commander 349th 
TCWg., Hamilton AFB, Calif., for his unit's 1962 record of 
no accidents for almost 20,000 flying hours. ) Capt. Richard 
E. Deitrick (1) Commander, 7th Aeromedical Evacuation 
Group, Coraopolis, Pa., congratulates the commanders of two 
of his Group's aero. med. evac. squadrons for earning MATS' 
medical service Readiness Awards. The awards are presented 
for outstanding operational improvement during a fiscal year. 
At right is Capt. Donald Cook, 47th Sqd., Minneapolis, Minn., 
and (c) Maj. James E. Costanzo, 33rd Sqd., Greater Pittsburgh 
International Airport, Pa. Brig. Gen. Roy W. Nelson, Jr., 
(c) commander of MATS' Air Weather Service recently paid a 
personal visit to the Air National Guard's newest Weather 
Flight at Lambert Municipal Airport, St. Louis, Mo. The pur- 
pose of Gen. Nelson's visit was to sign the official report of 
inspection, thereby giving federal recognition of the new unit. 
Onlookers are (r) Maj. Charles K. Reynolds, commander of 
the new 110th Weather Flight, and Maj. Gen. Charles H. Du- 
Bois, Jr., chief of staff of the Missouri ANG and also Chairman 
of USAF's Reserve Forces Policy Committee. The new Flight 
is the 31st such ANG unit to train with and augment MATS 
with its global weather commitments. 

• 5-63-652499 



* 



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JULY 1963 



trie air reservist 



x 



The Official Magazine Of The Air Reserve Forces 




the air reservist 

Vol. XV— No. 6 July 1963 

AIR NATIONAL GUARD 
AIR FORCE RESERVE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 

EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 



The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of Hq USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, D.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq USAF. 









inn Mr rasorrlst 


MM 
gniui nyi 




• ibproMem 
tsseabr 




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kafc 



This month's cover is a symbolic rep- 
resentation of the variety of Air Guard 
missions which stem from federal, 
state and natural requirements. For a 
Guardsman's appraisal of the program 
— its strong points and its problem 
areas— see story by Brig. Gen. William 
R. Sefton, page 8. 



Scanning^^j) 



Reserve pilots sought for astronaut training. 




Air National Guardsmen and Air Force Reservists fortunate enou 
to be selected for the NASA astronaut training program can expi 
to undergo periods of weightlessness similar to that being expe 
enced by these trainees in a C-135 at Wright-Patterson AFB, Oh 



GEN. LeMAY ON 
USE OF RESERVISTS 



In a letter 
to all Air 
Force 
commanders and key staff officers, 
General Curtis E. LeMay, Air Force 
chief of staff, spelled out the follow- 
ing policy concerning the use of Re- 
serve Forces: 

"It is necessary that commanders 
and their staffs throughout the Air 
Force understand the importance of 
placing proper emphasis on training 
units and individuals of the Air Na- 
tional Guard and the Air Force Re- 
serve to perform their tasks in the 
total Air Force mission. It is equally 
essential that such tasks be selected 
and assigned on the basis of realistic 
Air Force requirements and Air Re- 
serve Forces capabilities. 

"As the only available sources of 
unit and individual augmentation for 
the Air Force during periods of inter- 
national stress, it is important that the 
capability of these components be 
maintained at a high level. Command- 
ers and staff agencies at all levels of 
command must exert comprehensive 
effort in the planning, management 
and training of the Air National Guard 
and the Air Force Reserve. Such a 
program will insure that the Air Na- 
tional Guard and the Air Force Re- 
serve will continue to provide both the 
responsive and combat ready units 



and the trained individuals capab] 
meeting the exacting needs of 
Air Force. 

"I expect commanders and 
agencies of all echelons to insure 
those needs are capable of being 
by affording the Air Force Res 
Forces the same high quality of 
pervision, training, and suppor 
provided active duty units of the 
Force." 

NASA SEEKING The'] 

MORE ASTRONAUTS tional 

_ onaut 



and Space Administration is see 
applications from Reservists 
Guardsmen interested in beco 
an Astronaut. 

Applicants selected will ent 
full time training program at 
Manned Spacecraft Center, Hou 
Tex., that is designed to pn 
them for the proposed Gemini 
Apollo space flights. Accordin 
Mr. John Cairl, personnel offia 
NASA, about 10 or 15 appli 
will be chosen, depending upor 
number who qualify. Requirer 
are most exacting and include: 
plicant must be physically fit an 
taller than six feet; must be a 1 
citizen, born after June 30, 1 
possess a degree in engineering c 
physical sciences; be recomme 



his present Air Force Reserve or 
• National Guard unit commander, 
i he must have at least 1 ,000 hours 
jet pilot experience, or have at- 
led experimental flight test status 
is would require the successful 
npletion of a test pilot school) 
ler through military, civilian or 
kSA sources. 

Reservists and Guardsmen who 
et the above qualifications and 
h to apply may do so by forward- 

this information to: Hq National 
ronautics and Space Administra- 
l, Attn: Personnel Officer, P. O. 
k 18534, Houston 23, Texas. 



ROA HIGHLIGHTS 
AT MIAMI BEACH 



The ROA's 

37th annual 

convention 

5 held June 12 to 15 at Miami 
ich, Fla. Attending the function 
re many prominent Regular and 
serve military officers and distin- 
shed guests having an interest in 
Reserve Forces. 

keynote speakers were the Hon. 
gene M. Zuckert, Secretary of the 

Force, and the Assistant Secre- 
/ of Defense for Manpower, the 
n. Norman S. Paul. Other Air 
xe leaders who spoke were Lt. 
a. William S. Stone, deputy chief 
staff for Personnel; Lt. Gen. E. J. 
iberlake, commander, Continental 

Command; Maj. Gen. Winston 
Wilson, who next month becomes 
;f of staff of the National Guard 
reau, and Maj. Gen. Curtis R. 
tt, assistant chief of staff for Re- 
ve Forces, Hq USAF. 
;n reference to the Reserve forces, 
retary Zuckert stated: "Nowhere 
he importance of man in his na- 
lal defense role more evident than 
ong Reservists. Here you can more 



Awards At ROA 

J) Attendees at ROA's mid-June 
invention at Miami Beach, Fla., 
iaw MATS Commander, General 
loe W. Kelly, honor Air Force Re- 
wrve's 303rd Air Rescue Sqd., 
Karch AFB, Calif., with ROA's out- 
standing unit award. 303rd Com- 
nander, Lt. Col. Reginald Anderson 
iccepts award. (2) CONAC Com- 
nander, It. Gen. E. J. Timberlake 
>rtsented the command's one thou- 
sandth "1,000 Hour Achievement 
Certificate of Aircrew Recognition" 
o SSgt. Marshall J. McGinnis of 
he 76th Troop Carrier Squadron, 
Homestead AFB, Fla. 



readily see him as a local citizen, a 
part of a family unit, a producer of 
goods or services, as well as an on- 
call defender of freedom." 

Secretary Zuckert urged the con- 
vention to work for legislation which 
would benefit not only its own lot 
but that of the Regular Air Force. 

He told the group: "I suggest that 
we should not lose sight of the fact 
that the more rewarding we make 
service in the active forces the more 
rewarding we can make service in 
the Reserve forces. The trend is to- 
ward closer integration of the latter 
with the active forces." 

He lauded the Reservists for their 
effective response during the Cuban 
crisis of the past year and said: "This 
kind of readiness must be maintained 
at a high level and even strengthened. 
We are reminding all of our com- 
manders in the active forces of the 
importance of placing proper empha- 
sis on training Reservists and Guards- 
men to perform their tasks in the 
total Air Force mission." 

Based on his experience of almost 
one year as commander of CONAC, 
General Timberlake reviewed the 
problem areas of the Air Force Re- 
serve and listed the first requirement 
as the need for more realistic pro- 
gramming for the Reserve Forces, 
and the second as pertains to manning 
and retention. The general stressed 
two other factors which were also 
pointed out by Mr. Paul — the need 
for gaining recognition of the Re- 
serve Forces within the local com- 
munities, and the problem of the em- 
ployer-employee relationship as it 
affects the Reserve program. General 
Timberlake also referred to the pro- 
posed reorganization of the Air Force 
Reserve's medical program. 



General Low discussed the recent 
organizational changes made in the 
office of the assistant chief of staff 
for Reserve Forces and outlined the 
progress being made in coping with 
the manning problem throughout the 
Air Reserve Forces. 

Several individual and unit awards 
were presented during the four-day 
assembly with Mr. Robert W. Smart 
chief counsel of the House Armed 
Services Committee (also a Brig. Gen. 
in the Air Force Reserve) receiving 
ROA's highest general award, the 
Distinguished Service Citation, "for 
outstanding contributions to National 
Defense." The 8508th Air Force Re- 
serve Recovery Group, Ft. Worth, 
Tex, was honored as the "Outstand- 
ing Recovery Group" among 
C O N A C ' s 82-group, nationwide 
structure. In the "Other Reserve 
Unit" category, the 303rd Air Res- 
cue Squadron, March AFB, Calif., 
was named the outstanding unit and 
was accorded appropriate honors. 



PARTNERSHIP PLAN 
LAUDED BY CONAC 



Lt. Gen. E. 
J. Timber- 
lake, com- 
mander, Continental Air Command, 
recently gave his personal attention 
to a very meaningful ceremony con- 
ducted by CONAC's 445th Troop 
Carrier Wing, Dobbins AFB, Ga. 

Aptly labeled "Operation Partner- 
ship," the program was devoted to 
honoring the wives and employers 
of those Reservists who had been 
recalled during the Cuban crisis. 
Brig. Gen. George H. Wilson, com- 
mander of the 445th, played host to 
an estimated 17,000 Atlanta area 
residents, including many prominent 
figures in industry and politics. 

The central theme of the affair 
see NEXT page 




Scanning 



"Dixie" wing honors partners-wives and employers. 




Seventeen thousand Atlanta area residents recently attended ceremonies 
conducted by the 445th TCWg., Dobbins AFB, Ga., honoring wives and 
employers of Air Force Reservists recalled during the '62 Cuban crisis. 



continued from page 3 

was to express the Air Force Re- 
serve's cognizance of, and apprecia- 
tion for the numerous sacrifices en- 
dured by families and employers dur- 
ing the Reservists' absence. 

A feature attraction at the event 
was a performance by Air Force's 
famed aerial demonstration team, 
The Thunderbirds. The Open House- 
type ceremony included the award of 
special citations to five employers 
and five wives of 445th personnel. 
The ten recipients chosen at random 
served as a representative group for 
all employers and wives affected. 
Each received a special certificate of 
appreciation for his cooperation and 
understanding during the crisis. 

In an address to the attendees, 
General Timberlake summed up the 
spirit of the occasion as he said, 
"When some 14,000 Air Force Re- 
servists were summoned to immed- 
iate active duty in that crisis the na- 
tion suddenly realized that the 
Reserve was an important part of 
our deterrent power." He paid trib- 
ute to the wives and employers, say- 
ing, "You are in a true sense full 
partners in the Air Reserve program." 

At last month's ROA convention 
held at Miami Beach, Fla., General 
Timberlake pointed with pride to the 
efforts of the members of the 445th, 
and stressed the favorable attitude 
of one of Georgia's leading business- 
men, bank president, Mr. Mills B. 
Lane. According to General Timber- 
lake, Mr. Lane was confronted with 
the fact that 40 of his employees were 



suddenly dropped from his staff by 
reason of their recall to active duty. 
Mr. Lane's reaction was to call a 
meeting of these Reservists and ad- 
vise them that their position with the 
bank was in no way affected by their 
Reserve affiliation and that, in his 
personal opinion, these Reservists 
could use their active duty time as a 
means of gaining knowledge which 
would make them more valuable em- 
ployees upon their return. 



"TRY ONE" DRIVE 
TO BE CONTINUED 



"Try One" 
— the Air 
National 
Guard's all-out recruiting drive initi- 
ated last February, has ended. 

The drive's purpose was to raise 
Air Guard strength to 72,000 by June 
30. As of June 15, with 45 of the 52 
participants reporting, the Air Guard's 
strength was 72,693, surpassing its 
original goal. 

Guard officials were so pleased 
with early returns of Try One that 
the drive will be continued. The new 
goal will be to increase total strength 
to between 73,000 and 75,000 by the 
end of the next fiscal year. Ail 
provisions of the Try One program 
will be extended, including the op- 
portunity offered former servicemen 
to sign with the Air Guard for a one- 
year tour in the highest grade they 
previously held on active duty. 

Under Try One, each of the 50 
states, Puerto Rico and the District 
of Columbia, were actually assigned 
two quotas — a prior-service enlist- 
ment quota and a net gain quota. 



These were designed to increase th 
strength of state ANG units to alig 
them with the total Air Guard avei 
age. (see June '63 AIR RESERVIST 
To stimulate interest and to keej 
participants informed of progress, th 
Guard Bureau compared the driv 
to a steeplechase. Each month th 
various adjutants general were ii 
formed of the current track positio 
(standing) of their particular "horse 
(State) and that of the others. 

The latest report from the Burea 
indicates that 11 of the participan 
had already crossed the finish Hi 
with a 100 percent or better achiev< 
ment record. 

North Dakota ANG led the fie] 
with a net gain of 183.78 percen 
The other 10 in order of percental 
gain were: Idaho, 161.76; Pueri 
Rico, 153.84; Delaware, 124.32; Mi 
sissippi, 119.64; Utah, 114.28; H 
waii, 109.09; Oregon, 108.25; Mil 
nesota, 105.51; Tennessee, 102.( 
and Virginia, 100 percent. 



CIVILIANS TRAIN 
RECOVERYMEN 



CONAC 

9319th A 
. Force R 
serve Recovery Squadron of We 
Palm Beach, Fla., has been autho 
ized by Headquarters USAF to u 
the facilities of Butler Aviation, In< 
of West Palm Beach International Ai 
port, on a six-month trial basis 
provide training for squadron mei 
bers. The program was initiated < 
Armed Forces Day. 

Basically, the program allows tl 
9319th to use equipment and perso 
nel of Butler for unit training pi 
poses once a month. The compa 
offers the Reservists training in t 
areas of aircraft maintenance, d 
patch, parking and fueling. All trai 
ing is under the guidance and sup( 
vision of qualified firm employees. 

The 9319th is presently the or 
Recovery squadron in the nation e 
gaged in this type of training. 

Mr. Frank O. Butler II, assists 
general manager of Butler Aviati 
volunteered the company's facilit: 
without cost to the government 1; 
June, but at that time such traini 
interchange was prohibited. Lt. C 
Louis B. Bills, 9319th commanc 
and Butler later presented a pi 
which showed the need for such 
arrangement and how it would bene 
national defense. 

This "first" in a new type of trai 
ing program may eventually lead 
similar arrangements between oil 
Reserve units and civilian firms, 
will, however, be contingent upon t 
outcome of the present trial progra 



IG BLAST PAPA In separate 
ND APACHE OPAL examples 
of Air Na- 
il Guard and active forces part- 
iip, Guard jets were "targets" 
lg recent exercises conducted by 
h American Air Defense Com- 
d's 26th and Northern Regions, 
le exercises were "Big Blast 
i," in May, and "Apache Opal," 
last month. These exercises per- 
sd NORAD forces from Maine to 
[Tarolinas, west to the Ohio bor- 
and through most of Canada, to 
their defenses, 
total of 36 ANG striker aircraft 

nine states participated in the 

exercise. They were deployed 
Hancock Field, N.Y.; Dow 
jj Me.; Niagara Falls, N.Y., and 
lley AFB, Bermuda, to fly routes 
h covered the battle area. 
ORAD attempted to intercept 

target several times to give the 
lses a maximum of practice, 
uard target aircraft were given 
ise tracks to fly, set up to match 

simulated tracks programmed 
a computer. This was displayed 
le NORAD battle staff so that 

could coordinate the exercise 
make evaluations of the success 
ie weapons involved. 
>r example, RB-57 crews from 
123rd Tactical Reconnaissance 
I (Kentucky ANG), took off from 
lley AFB, and penetrated the 

coastline between Boston and 
leston at 40,000 to 47,000 feet. 
' then flew into Stewart AFB, 
, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, 
sville, Ky., and Little Rock, Ark. 
: Shewmaker ANG Base in Louis- 
, the RB-57 "targets" landed 
een two and six in the morning, 
istoms inspector had to be hauled 
in the early-morning darkness 
leek the Guardsmen's baggage — 
inusual assignment in Louisville 
h has no regularly scheduled 
seas flights. 

tie 123rd Wing's four squadrons 
i Arkansas, Kansas, Kentucky 
Nevada, all had RB-57s in the 
:ise. Oklahoma ANG C-97s air- 
1 maintenance crews and spare 
; in support of the aircraft, 
uring the exercise, Maj. Romolo 
li and Capt. Eugene Galley of 
136th Tactical Fighter Squadron 
Niagara Falls, (NY-ANG) took 
r om their home base at 2:00 a.m. 
flew a target run that took them 

Buffalo, N.Y., to Raleigh, N.C. 
then to Myrtle Beach, S.C. 
sfore and during target runs of 
Guard and other aircraft, 
IAD took other actions to sim- 
J all the different events of an 



attack on the U.S. 

The 26th NORAD Region again 
tested its skills during exercise 
"Apache Opal" in June. Once more, 
the Air Guard took to the skies as 
"targets" to help in keeping our 
armed forces at peak proficiency. 
Guard aircraft from thirteen states 
participated, contributing a total of 
49 aircraft. They were from Illinois, 
Maine, Massachusetts, Kansas, Wis- 
consin, Mississippi, Arkansas, Ne- 
vada, New York, Vermont, Virginia, 
Kentucky, and Michigan. 



TAX RULE FAVORS 
RESERVE FORCES 



Internal 
Revenue 
Service 
las ruled that members of the 
Air Reserve Forces are in a "travel 
status" while they are serving on 
temporary active duty (Revenue Rule 
63-64). Thus, the expense of the Air 
Force Reservist or Air National 
Guardsman's meals and lodging at 
his official post of training duty are 



deductible when such expenses ex- 
ceed any non-taxable allowances for 
subsistence or quarters. Basic to the 
allowance of this deduction is the 
Reservist's or Guardsman's mainte- 
nance of a regular place of business 
other than where his duty occurs; i.e., 
the duty must take place away from 
the general area where his civilian 
place of employment is located. 
Further, only his own expenses, not 
those of his family, are so deductible. 

Those to whom meals and lodging 
are furnished in kind are considered 
to have incurred no expenses and are 
not entitled to a deduction. 

The new ruling applies to those 
who served during the Berlin and 
Cuban crises. Claims for refund may 
be filed for the 1961-62 periods. This 
can be done either by submitting an 
amended tax return or by filing a 
Form 843 (Claim for Refund). A 
claim for refund will frequently re- 
sult in an examination of the person's 
tax return for that period. 




(1) Bermuda stop during Big Blast Papa meant filing customs forms by 
Col. Verne Yahne (I) and Maj. James McClure at Shewmaker ANG base, 
Ky. Inspector Boyd Jones helps. (2) Two Guardsmen at Kindley AFB, 
Bermuda, fuel an Arkansas ANG RB-57 during Apache Opal. 




Scanning^)) 



WILLIAM TELL Represcn 

MEET IN OCTOBER ing the A 

Nation 




Twenty-eight Military Air Transport Service C-121G Super Constel- 
lations such as the one pictured above soon will replace the C-119s 
now used by three Air National Guard aeromedical transport squadrons. 



CONSTELLATIONS A Wyom- 
FOR AIR GUARD ing Air 

. National 



Guard flight crew became the first 
Air Guardsmen to complete a six- 
week C-121G Super Constellation 
training and transfer program con- 
ducted by the U.S. Navy at the Naval 
Air Station, Moffett Field, California, 
last month. 

The ANG crew, members of the 
187th Aeromedical Transport Sq., 
of Cheyenne, then ferried the first 
of a series of newly-adopted Con- 
stellations to their home base. 

Under the program, Navy Air 
Transport Wing, Pacific, a component 
of the Military Air Transport Service, 
will transfer 28 of the big four-engine 
aircraft to the Air Guard. They will 
also provide Guard air crews and 
maintenance personnel with the neces- 
sary transitional training. This will 
include a two-week ground school 
refresher course, 20 hours of instruc- 
tion in a C-121 flight simulator, 30 
to 50 hours of local flight instruction, 
and an over-the-water familiarization 
flight. A total of 12 pilots, 12 flight 
engineers (two each per crew) and 
48 maintenance personnel will be 
trained by July 15. 

Two other ANG units — the 167th 
Aeromedical Transport Sq., of Mar- 
tinsburg, W. Va., and the 147th 
AMTSq., of Pittsburgh, Pa., will re- 
ceive Navy C-121Gs in the near 
future. They already have flight and 
maintenance crews in training. 



The Air Guard previously ac- 
quired 28 of the longer range Connies 
from MATS, but the accepting crews 
were Air Force trained. The C-121Gs 
will replace the older twin-engine 
C-119 Flying Boxcars that the ANG 
units have been using for aeromedical 
evacuation. These larger, faster 
aircraft will enable Guardsmen to fly 
overseas missions which they could 
not do with the smaller C-119s. 

For about a year, four C-121 
equipped ANG aeromedical trans- 
port squadrons — the 183rd, Jackson, 
Miss.; 156th, Charlotte, N.C.; 150th, 
Newark, N.J., and the 140th of 
Olmsted AFB, Pa., have been train- 
ing to aid MATS in its world-wide 
aeromedical evacuation and military 
airlift programs. 

Upon completion of the present 
program the Navy will turn over to 
the Air National Guard the huge 
flight simulator now being used for 
training crews. The simulator, an 
exact replica of a Constellation's 
flight compartment, duplicates actual 
flight conditions. Under guidance of 
trained instructors, pilots and flight 
engineers are taught how to handle 
almost every possible in-flight emer- 
gency without ever leaving the 
ground. Consisting of 14 computer 
cabinets, together with connecting 
cables, a simulator fuselage and en- 
closure, the device presently occupies 
a 36 by 40 foot room at Moffett. It 
will be relocated at Martinsburg, W. 
Va., ANG base. 



Guard for this year's William T( 
Weapons Meet to be held at Tyndi 
AFB, Fla., in October, will be i 
crack 146th Fighter Intercept 
Squadron of Pittsburgh, Pa., 19( 
Ricks Trophy winners. 

The 146th is a part of Pennsj 
vania ANG's 112th Air Defeii 
Wing, standing 24-hour alert. 

For the first time in Air Gua 
history it will field a complete tea 
during the William Tell Meet. It \» 
include a ground force of weapo 
controllers and control technicia 
from the 130th Air Control a 
Warning Squadron, Salt Lake Ci 
Utah; 138th AC&WSq., Denv 
Colo., and the 140th AC&WSq., Pi 
ta Salinas, Puerto Rico. 

The ground force, all from I 
Guard radar units on 24-hour ale 
will train at active Air Force instal 
tions to become current in the equ 
ment they are to use at the me 
since it is not ordinarily assigned 
Air Guard installations. 



K.C. RESERVISTS Not v 

IN JOINT EXERCISE many p 
pie k n ( 



it, but a short while ago the sou 
eastern section of the United Sta 
came under attack by an aggres 
force. Shortly after the initial att; 
the Air Force began flying casuali 
to the Fitzsimmons General Hosp 
at Denver, Colo., but while enro 
Denver was annihilated by a nucl 
bomb. To make matters worse, 
airborne ambulances flew througl 
cloud of radioactive dust on their v 
to Fairfax Airport, Kansas City. 

Make believe? Of course, but 
a host of Army, Navy and Air Fo 
Reservists from the greater Kan 
City area it was not theory but i; 
and they reacted accordingly. 

The 8581st Air Force Reserve ] 
covery Group, Kansas City, N 
conceived the attack as part ol 
training exercise designed to test 
recovery capability of the Rese 
forces in the area. Lt. Col. J. V 
Ham Benton, commander of 
8581st, enlisted the cooperation of 
following units in the vicinity: 43 
Troop Carrier Wing, Bakalar A] 
Ind.; Air Wing Staff 88 of the N; 
Air Reserve, USNAS Olathe, K 
9544th AFRes Recovery Sq., F 
fax Airport; 9543rd AFRes Rec 
ery Sq., Mid-Continent IAP; 954 
AFRes Recovery Sq., Springfi 
Mo.; 9546th AFRes Recovery 
Joplin, Mo.; 325th Army Gen 



tpital, Kansas City, Kans.; 137th 
nsportation Co. (Light Helicop- 

of the Kansas Army National 
ird, Fairfax Airport; Civil Air 
rol cadets of the Wyandotte Com- 
ite Sq., Kansas City, Kans.; the 
ay's Special Forces Unit of Kan- 
City, and the firemen of the Kan- 
City Fire Department, 
is soon as the first mental bomb 
st two C-119s from the 434th 
Wg., and one C-45 from the 
ry's AWS 88 began hauling their 
ents to Denver, were diverted, 
' through a contaminated area, 

made for Fairfax Airport. Upon 
ving the aircraft were met by the 
:overy group and squadron per- 
nel who, with the assistance of the 
nen and CAP cadets, serviced the 
raft and crews, including decon- 
ination. The ground forces also 
sted with the transfer of the cas- 
ies to the field hospital set up at 
airport by the men of the 325th 
ny hospital unit. The Army's heli- 
ter company was used to trans- 
t the flight crews from the exercise 
i to a debriefing site, 
lie only villains of the exercise 
le from the Army's Special Forces 
t, who represented the enemy in 

form of an infiltration group. 
:n they were successful in their 
sion, that of liberating an im- 
tant prisoner of war who was 
ard the aircraft along with the 
inded. 



:iVIL DEFENSE 
ATTACHMENT 



Air Force 
Res ervists 

attached 

a Civil Defense office are advised 
t Air Reserve Records Center, 
iver, Colo., may only publish CD 
ichment orders: upon being ad- 
:d of a Reservist's selection by the 
3t. of the Army; to revoke such 
ers at the request of the Reservist 
CD office concerned; or to relieve 
iervists by reason of transfer, in- 
lity to continue participation, or 
ure to earn enough points for re- 
tion in an active status. 
VRRC does not have a listing of 
various Civil Defense offices or 
ir requirements. 

f you are presently attached but 
e located another office which can 
ize your services and is better 
:ed for your situation, have the di- 
tor submit a request for your at- 
timent in accordance with Civil 
fense procedures to the Depart- 
nt of the Army. 

f you are not presently attached 
i desire an attachment, contact 
ir local Civil Defense director. 




MATS GAINS FIVE All five 
AFRes C-124 UNITS Air Force 
Reserve 



Joint Training Stressed 

(t) Cheyenne, Wyoming, Guards- 
men, Brig. Gen. Roy E. Cooper, (c) 
end Maj. Frank Jurenka (r) learn 
operation of C-121 flight simula- 
tor from Navy Lt. R. McLoskey. 
(D Reservists of 325th Army 
Hosp., Kansas City, Kans., handle 
mock casualties during joint 
recovery exercise conducted by 
8581st AFRes Recovery Gp., 
Kansas City. 



troop carrier groups equipped with 
C-124 Globemasters were transferred 
from the gaining-command jurisdic- 
tion of Tactical Air Command to the 
Military Air Transport Service on 
July 1. The C-124 is considered bet- 
ter suited to the global cargo and per- 
sonnel carrying mission of MATS 
than TAC's combat assault mission. 

The five groups were: 935th and 
936th, Richards-Gebaur AFB, Mo.; 
937th, Tinker AFB, Okla.; 916th, 
Carswell AFB, Tex., and the 917th 
at Barksdale AFB, La. Under the 
present equipment authorizations, 
each group is authorized eight air- 
craft. All are now under the jurisdic- 
tion of Brig. Gen. James P. McPart- 
lin, 442nd Troop Carrier Wing com- 
mander at Richards-Gebaur. 

Continental Air Command will 
continue to command and provide 
administrative, budgetary, and logis- 
tic support for the units just as it 
administers troop carrier units ear- 
marked for TAC. TAC will remain 
the gaining command for Air Force 
Reserve troop carrier units equipped 
with C-119 and C-123 aircraft— 14 
wings with 40 groups throughout the 
nation. The units involved in the 
transfer are the same five which 
served on active duty under Tactical 
Air Command during the Berlin re- 
call of 1961-62. 



NEW AIR GUARD 
FIRING PROGRAM 



The Air De- 
fense Com- 
m a n d initi- 
ated a new fighter interceptor firing 
program, in May which again includ- 
ed the Air Guard. The plan set up no 
regular firing deployments, but au- 
thorized deployments for firing on the 
basis of special weapons evaluation 
and testing requirements. 

Regular weapons deployments for 
training and testing were cut off in the 
Air Guard last September because of 
increased training and alert commit- 
ments of the active forces due to 
world tensions. 

Under the new program, ANG air- 
craft, from one plane to a full squad- 
ron, are requested by ADC on the 
same priority basis as regular ADC 
units to deploy to Tyndall AFB or 
some other designated test site for a 
specified number of days. Although 
the first mission of these deployments 
is "to support and conduct specific 
tests" on interceptor weapon sys- 
tems, Air Guard fighter interceptor 
units will, of course, reap training 
benefits from the deployments. 



w, 






by Brig. Gen. William R. Sefton 

Commander, 

122nd Tactical Fighter Wing 




,its problems 

. its strong points 

as seen by 

an <zMir (guardsman 






HILE FIRST AND FOREMOST an 

essential link in the "total force" con- 
cept of our nation's military structure, 
the Air National Guard may also be 
termed a "home town" Air Force. 
Each unit, besides being comprised 
of members of the local community, 
is also sustained by that community's 
understanding and moral support. 
This dual role of ANG, its organiza- 
tional structure, and its operating 
methods are unique to the point that 
they could not be duplicated in any- 
thing other than a democratic system 
of government such as ours. 

The Second Amendment to the 
Constitution permits all citizens to 
bear arms, and gives the individual 
states the right to maintain a military 
organization for self protection. These 
rights are as valid today as they were 
almost two centuries ago when first 
conceived. However, the evolution 
from the militia of the late 1700's to 
the efficient fighting force it is now, 
was a period filled with controversy, 
political pressures, and a lack of un- 
derstanding between the Guard and 
the active military forces. The old 
arguments of political stigma, state 
colonels, and raggedy militia, are dis- 
appearing with each successive Guard 
triumph; but, as few and as weak as 
they may be, they tend to leave the 
public confused and anxious to know 
for certain whether their tax dollars 
are being spent judiciously. 

On the other hand, it may be that 
these problem areas of the early days 
helped make the Air Guard the vital, 
first line component of the aerospace 
force which it is today by placing it 
on the defensive and forcing it to 
prove its capability by deeds rather 
than by words. 

There is a spirit of competition 
within the Guard which is stronger 
than I can describe. It is friendly yet 
genuine and aims for progress and 
perfection. It is a competitive spirit 
which pits each Guard unit against 
every other unit of its kind. 

Often criticized and seldom under- 
stood is the Guard's highly decentral- 
ized command system which permits 
each state to have its own organiza- 
tion with the governor as commander- 
in-chief. What critics may not realize 
is that all Air Guard units are trained 
by and required to meet the same 
standards that apply to the active duty 
Air Force. Guardsmen operate and 
maintain the equipment, fly the 
planes, and fire the weapons according 
to USAF procedures. The difference 
is a matter of Who is doing the job, 
not How it is being done. 

When the Guard is under state 



control, its affairs are administered I 
officers appointed by the governor, 
accordance with the laws of the sta 
and the requirements of the acti 
military establishment. The Guard 
available to the governor to ass 
with civil emergencies and to t 
President in times of national cris 
Every Guardsman assumes the o 
ligation of immediate readiness wh 
he joins a unit. He knows that, as 
member of a 100 percent volunte 
organization, he must devote the th 
required to be proficient. 

The hard core of the Air Gua 

program is composed of veterans 

World War II and Korea. Some i 

ex-Marines; others served with t 

Army or Navy, but most of th< 

gained their experience with the / 

Force. These people stay in the I 

Guard for various reasons. Most < 

it as a patriotic avocation where th 

can enjoy a feeling of accompli! 

ment and fellowship. From this gro 

come the supervisors and instruct! 

who mold our non-prior service 

cruits into full-fledged Guardsmen. 

Also from this group come most 

the full-time technicians who : 

technically state employees paid w 

federal funds. One of the main n 

sons for the Guard's success is t 

highly professional, stable force 

technicians who are devoted to th 

jobs and to the Air National Gua 

A look at the facility and operat 

expenses at one location (Baer Fk 

Ind.) should prove the dollar-sav 

value of the Air Guard structure. 

Because we share the use of 

already existing civilian flying facil 

the only costs borne by the Fede 

Government are for such things 

minimum essential operational ; 

training facilities as well as for 

arresting barriers and extra runv 

length for the military aircraft. ( 

construction costs are meager cc 

pared to Air Force-owned milit 

bases. The maintenance cost for 

use of Baer Field, paid to the c 

is our pro-rata share of the t( 

traffic and although high, it rep 

sents a tremendous savings to 

taxpayer when compared to the 

pense of maintaining a complete bi 

Baer Field's control tower, ra 

approach equipment and other ni 

gation and communications eqi 

ment are operated and maintained 

the FAA at no cost to the Air Gus 

The exclusive military base must r. 

vide its own services in this area i 

tremendous cost. 

There are many other expen: 
items which must be provided 
active-duty unit which the Air Gu 



not furnish. Some of these are 
ling, dining halls, recreational fa- 
es, hospitals, and large transpor- 
>n and communication systems, 
he system of assignment of air- 
: to the Guard, represents an- 
r saving to the taxpayer. The Air 
rd has been an outlet for the 

airplanes generated by the new 
els being bought by the Ab- 
ie. This savings then is in the 
1 of amortization of the invest- 
t for a longer period. Our present 
aft were built in 1951-1952, 
,ed out of the Regular Air Force 
956-1957. The Air Guard has 
nded the useful life by at least 
/ears, giving the taxpayer double 
noney's worth. 

:>me say this is false economy, but 
;e past history to show pay-offs 
ly affecting our military posture, 
he outbreak of the Korean war, 

Regular Air Force had been 
tically reduced in numbers of 
er aircraft. Virtually all the pro- 
:r F-5 1 Mustangs were in the Air 
rd inventory, in excellent condi- 

The Air Force immediately had 
quirement for fighters beyond its 



own capability, and the Air Guard 
reacted by ferrying a number of 
F-5 Is to the West Coast for trans- 
fer to Korea. Meanwhile, replace- 
ment F-5 Is were given to the Air 
Guard from the "bone yard." Shortly 
thereafter many of the Guard wings 
were ordered to active duty for the 
air defense of the United States and 
to furnish pilots and ground person- 
nel for the Korean conflict. When 
this war ended, the Regular Air Force 
retained our aircraft and equipment, 
and those of our people who volun- 
teered for a career. We returned to 
state control somewhat decimated and 
without equipment, but we had filled 
the gap. 

In 1961 the Berlin contingency 
operation arose. Again the Regular 
Air Force fighter force was danger- 
ously low. The only source of need- 
ed fighters to "beef up" Europe and 
the Tactical Air Force was in the 
Air Guard. Most of these fighters 
were the F-84F — some 10 years old 
— long discarded by the Regular Air 
Force, but nevertheless possessing 
some respectability for the type of 
conflict contemplated. The President 
called the Air Guard tactical fighter 




(1) Air National Guardsmen "filled the gap" during Berlin crisis 
of 1961, by adding men and equipment to the federal military force. 

(2) Guardsmen labored through night to combat mid-winter floods 
near Jackson, Miss., and save Flowood community from submersion. 




wings to active duty, immediately ex- 
panding the fighter force for the job 
at hand, and as before, most of the 
Guard's aircraft were retained to 
equip active force units. 

Korea and Berlin demonstrated 
that our older aircraft were important. 
The main point is that the gap was 
filled by an effective system which is 
within financial reason. Obviously, to 
maintain an Active-duty fighter force 
for the 10 years or so prior to Korea 
until the present — one that would 
meet any contingency — would be a 
prohibitive drain on our economy. 

Now we are rebuilding again — 
looking for better ways to do a job 
within the economy concept of the 
Air Guard. The aircraft presently as- 
signed are old and inferior in per- 
formance compared to the potential 
enemy. Although the used aircraft 
system has worked well in the past 
and has been to the economic ad- 
vantage of the taxpayer, there is a 
need for change to modernize our 
philosophy and still achieve the in- 
herent economy of the Air National 
Guard. The Air Guard needs new 
tactical aircraft, possessing the best in 
performance and combat capability. 
I would like assurance that the Air 
Guard will be furnished modern 
weapons in the future as the require- 
ments change. When and if this be 
missiles, the Air Guard should be 
in the missile business or performing 
other space age missions consistent 
with its inherent capability. Such 
modern weapon systems would pro- 
vide true deterrence as valid, I be- 
lieve, as that of the Regular Forces. 
It would not be necessary to federal- 
ize the Air Guard in another Berlin 
situation to show our adversaries our 
power. The intelligence agents of the 
enemy would compute these weapons 
and their potential as a routine mat- 
ter of fact. The natural dispersion of 
Air Guard bases, which includes 
every state in the Union, certainly 
would complicate enemy target plan- 
ning. Should it be necessary to ac- 
tually engage the enemy, the modern 
equipment would be an important 
factor in assuring victory. 

The Air National Guard today is a 
proud outfit — determined to do any 
job better than anyone else can. Re- 
gardless of what future events bring, 
these Citizen-Airmen will produce 
what is needed, when it is needed. 
The nation needs the Air Guard just 
as it needs the active duty aerospace 
force. Every member of the Air Na- 
tional Guard is doing something for 
his country. 



Officer and enlisted vacancies in the following Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve units have been consolidated and are listed '. 
State. Positions offer up to 48 paid drills, a 15-day tour of active duty annually, retirement points, and possible promotion. Applica 
should write directly to unit of choice, giving full name, address, grade and AFSC. 



ted 



IEGEND: To identify officer vacancies, 0-2 stands for First Lieutenant; 0-3 for Captain; 0-4 for Major; 0-5 for Lieutenant Colonel, and 0-6 for Cok* 
Where openings exist in the same Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) for more than one grade, the lowest and highest grades are indicated. Example: 0-J 
means there are openings for grades First Lieutenant through Lieutenant Colonel. Enlisted: The AFSC identifies both the job and the skill level. At an txi 
pie, the #5 in 72150 indicates openings for Staff Sergeants and Airmen First Class in the Information career field. Similarly #9 refers to Chief and San 
Master Sergeants, and #7 to Master and Technical Sergeants. 



ALASKA 
144 Air Trans. Sq., Anchorage— 
(ANG) Officers: (0-2/5) ten open- 
ings in AFSC 1045Z and (0-2/5) 
one in 1535. Enlisted: Three open- 
ings in AFSC A60750/70. 

ALABAMA 

106 Tac. Recon. Sq., Birmingham — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) six open- 
ings in AFSC 1325C. 

160 Tac. Recon. Sq., Montgomery — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) eight open- 
ings in 1325C. 

ARIZONA 

197 Air Trans. Sq., Phoenix— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) 15 openings in 
AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 22 in 1535 
and (0-2/3) 12 in 9754. Enlisted: 
eight in AFSC A43570 and ten in 
A90250/70. 

152 FISq., Tucson— (ANG) Officer: 
(0-2/3) two openings in AFSC 
1125Z. 

ARKANSAS 

184 Tac. Recon. Sq., Ft. Smith— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) seven open- 
ings in AFSC 1325C. 

154 Tac. Recon. Sq., Little Rock— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) three open- 
ings in AFSC 1325Z 

CALIFORNIA 

194 FISq., Fresno— (ANG) Officer: 
(0-2/3) two openings in AFSC 
1125A. 

129 TCSq., Hayward— (ANG) Of- 
ficer: (0-2/5) one opening in AFSC 
1535. 

195 Air Trens. Sq., Van Nuys — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 20 open- 
ings in AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 18 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) six in 9754. 
Enlisted: six openings in AFSC 
A43570 and two in A90250/70. 

115 Air Trans. Sq., Van Nuys— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 20 open- 
ings in AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 24 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) six in 9754. 
Enlisted: six openings in AFSC 
A43570 and four in A90250/70. 

COLORADO 

120 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Denver— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) eight openings in 
AFSC 1115B. 

CONNECTICUT 
118 FISq., Windsor Locks— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/3) four openings in 
AFSC 1125Z. 

DELAWARE 
142 Air Trans. Sq., Wilmington — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 20 open- 
ings in AFSC 1045B. (0-2/5) 20 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) 14 in 9754. 
Enlisted: ten openings in AFSC 
A43570 and 25 in A90250/70. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

121 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Andrews AFB— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 11 open- 
ings in AFSC 1115B. 

FLORIDA 
159 FISq., Jacksonville— (ANG) Of- 
ficer: (0-2 3) four openings in 
AFSC 1 125Q 

GEORGIA 
445 TCW|., Dobbins AFB— (AFRes) 
Officer (0-6) one opening in 
AFSC 0066. (0-2) 11 in 1055A 
and (0-2) one in 1535. Enlisted: 
one opening in AFSC A43I51A. 



128 Air Trans. Sq., Dobbins AFB— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 15 open- 
ings in AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 14 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) 11 in 9754. 
Enlisted: two openings in AFSC 
A60750/70 and six in A90250/70. 

158 Air Trans. Sq., Savannah — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 17 open- 
ings in AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 18 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) 11 in 9754. 
Enlisted: six openings in AFSC 
A43570 and 20 in A90250/70. 

IDAHO 
190 FISq., Boise— (ANG) Officer: 
(0-2) four openings in AFSC 
1125A. 

ILLINOIS 
108 Air Refueling Sq., Chicago — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) four open- 
ings in AFSC 1065B and (0-2/5) 
six in 1535. Enlisted: three open- 
ings in AFSC A43570/90. 

169 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Peoria— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) 12 openings in 
AFSC 1115A. 

170 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Springfield— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 12 open- 
ings in AFSC 1115A. 

264 Comm. Sq., Chicago— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2) limited number of 
vacancies in AFSC 3034 and 4724. 

INDIANA 

163 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Ft. Wayne— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 12 open- 
ings in AFSC 1115A. 

113 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Terre Haute— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 14 open- 
ings in AFSC 11 ISA. 

IOWA 

124 FISq., Des Moines— (ANG) Of- 
ficer: (0-2/3) four openings in 
AFSC 1564 and (0-2/3) one in 
1124B. 

174 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Sioux City— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) six open- 
ings in AFSC 1115B. 

KANSAS 

177 Tac. Recon. Sq., Hutchinson — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) two open- 
ings in AFSC 1335. 

127 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Wichita— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) 11 openings in 
AFSC 1115B. 

MAINE 
132 FISq., Bangor— (ANG) Officer: 
(0-2/3) six openings in AFSC 1564 
and (0-2/3) four in 1124B. 

MARYLAND 

104 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Baltimore— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) eight openings in 
AFSC 1115A. 

135 TCSq., Baltimore— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/5) one opening in AFSC 
1535. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

94 TCWg., L. G. Hanscom Fid — 
(AFRes) 
OFFICER 

AFSC Grade No. 1535 

1055ZO-4 1 5525 

1055ZO-3 5 6034 

1055Z 0-2 8 6424 

1334 0-3 1 9356 

1435ZO-3 2 9926 

ENLISTED 

AFSC No. 55250 1 

20450 1 56350 2 

20470 1 56370 1 



0-2 


4 


0-3 


1 


0-3 


1 


0-2 


1 


0-4 


1 


0-4 


1 



22350 


1 


56550 


1 


29350 


1 


57150 


2 


A29352 


6 


57170 


1 


30171 


1 


57190 


1 


34250E 


1 


60251 


1 


34270E 


2 


60270 


1 


36150 


1 


60350A 


2 


36152 


1 


62250 


2 


36250 


1 


643 50A 


4 


40250 


1 


64550 


1 


42450 


1 


64570 


1 


43151A 


6 


64750 


4 


A43151A 


5 


67151 


1 


43171A 


3 


67170 


1 


43190 


1 


68570A 


1 


43251 


2 


70250 


8 


47150 


1 


70450 


2 


47151 


4 


73250 


1 


47152 


1 


75151 


1 


47153 


1 


75170 


1 


53250 


1 


90250B 


1 


53270 


1 


90252 


2 


53350 


1 


90650 


1 


53450 


1 


90850 


1 



101 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Boston— (ANG) 

Officer: (0-2/5) seven openings in 

AFSC 1115A. 
131 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Westfield— (ANG) 

Officer: (0-2/5) ten openings in 

AFSC 1115A. 

MICHIGAN 

172 Tac. Recon. Sq., Battle Creek— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) two open- 
ings in AFSC 1325Z. and (0-2/5) 
two in 1335. 

107 Tac. Recon. Sq., Detroit— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) three openings in 
AFSC 1325C. 

171 Tac. Recon. Sq., Detroit — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) three open- 
ings in AFSC 1325C. 

MINNESOTA 

179 FISq., Duluth— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3) three openings in 
AFSC 1564. 

109 Air Trans. Sq., St. Paul— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) 20 openings in 
AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 14 in 1535 
and (0-2/3) eight in 9754. En- 
listed: two openings in AFSC 
A43570, two in A6075O/7O and 
eight in A90250/70. 

MISSISSIPPI 

183 AMTSq., Jackson— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3) three openings in 
AFSC 1045B, D, Z, (0-2/3) five 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) seven in 9754. 
Enlisted: five openings in AFSC 
A43570/90 and 16 in A90230/70. 

153 Tac. Recon. Sq., Meridian — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) six open- 
ings in AFSC 1325C. 



MISSOURI 
442 TCWg., Richards-Gebaur 
—(AFRes) 

OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 



1055C 0-3 
I055C 0-2 
1334 0-3 
1416 0-4 
1435A 0-3 
1435Z 0-3 
1535 0-3 
1535CO-3 
1535 0-2 
3034 0-3 
3234C 0-3 
4344 0-3 
4355 0-3 



6034 0-3 
6424 0-3 
6424 0-2 
6444A 0-2 
6476A 0-2 
6724 0-2 



6834 
7024 
7324 
7324 
7344 
7444 
8054 



0-3 
0-2 
0-3 
0-2 
0-3 
0-3 
0-3 



AFB 



8924C 0-3 



4724 0-3 


1 


9025 0-3 


5525 0-3 


2 


9356 0-4 


5554 0-3 


2 


9926 0-4 


ENLISTED 


60251 


AFSC 


No. 


60350A 


20450 


2 


A60750 


20470 


2 


A60770 


23250 


1 


62150 


24170A 


2 


62250 


24170A 


2 


62470 


24270 


2 


64350A 


27150 


2 


64370A 


29150 


10 


64550 


29170 


1 


64570 


29350 


2 


64650 


30151B 


2 


64670 


30171B 


1 


64750 


30474 


1 


64770 


34250E 


2 


64771 


34270E 


2 


65150 


36150 


2 


67153 


36152 


3 


67170 


36250 


3 


67190 


36350 


2 


68170 


40250 


1 


68370 


40370 


1 


68550A 


43171A 


1 


68570A 


43190 


1 


70150P 


43271 


1 


70250 


A43570 


15 


70450 


47150 


3 


70470 


47151 


15 


70490 


47152 


1 


70570 


47153 


1 


70590 


53150 


2 


72170 


53250 


1 


73250B 


54350 


2 


74170 


54550 


3 


75150 


54570 


1 


77150 


55150 


3 


77170 


55151 


2 


90250B 


55250 


5 


90370 


55270 


2 


90470B 


55271 


1 


90650 


56350 


2 


90670 


56370 


2 


90671 


56550 


11 


90770 


56570 


2 


90850 


57150 


16 


90870 


57170 


3 


92250A 


60270 


1 


98270 



180 Air Trans. Sq., St. Joseph 

(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 18 op< 
ings in AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) 13 in 97: 
Enlisted: four openings in AF: 
A43570, one in A6075O/70 and 
in A90250/70. 
110 Tac. Ftr. Sq., St. Louis— (AN 
Officer: (0-2/5) three openings 
AFSC 1115B. 

MONTANA 
186 FISq., Great Falls— (ANG) 
cer: (0-2/3) seven openings 
AFSC 1564. 

NEVADA 
192 Tac. Recon. Sq., Reno— (AN 
Officer: (0-2/5) two openings 
AFSC 1325Z. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
902 TCGp., Manchester— (AFRes 



OFFICER 
AFSC Grade No. 



1055Z 0-3 
1055Z 0-2 
1334 0-3 



1435 
1535 
1935 
3034 
4344 
4355 



0-3 
0-2 
0-3 
0-3 
0-3 
0-3 



10 
19 
1 
5 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 



5525 0-3 
5554 0-3 
6424 0-3 
6444A 0-2 
6476A 0-2 
6896 0-3 
7024 0-3 
7024 0-2 
7324 0-2 
8816 0-4 
9356 0-4 



10 



LISTED 


55270 


No. 


56350 


1 


56370 


1 


56550 


1 


56570 


\ 1 


57150 


1 


57170 


6 


57190 


2 


58270 


4 


60270 


1 


62250 


2 


62470 


2 4 


64550 


1 


64570 


1 


64650 


2 


64670 


2 


64750 


1 


64771 


1 


65150 


1 


67170 


\ 6 


68170 


1A 7 


68570A 


\ 14 


70250 


2 


70270 


1 


70450 


1 


70570 


1 


73270B 


1 


74151 


1 


75170 


1 


75151 


1 


77150 


1 


90250B 


I 1 


90370 


1 


90470B 


1 


90770 


2 


90870 


2 


98150 



Mr Trans. Sq., Manchester — 
IG) Officer: (0-2/5) 18 open- 
in AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 20 
535 and (0-2/3) nine in 9754. 
isted: four openings in AFSC 
570, 15 in A90250/70. 



NEW JERSEY 
rac. Ftr. Sq., Atlantic City — 
IG) Officer: (0-2/5) 15 open- 
in AFSC 1115A. 
ac. Ftr. Sq., McGuire AFB— 
IG) Officer: (0-2/5) three open- 
in AFSC 1115A. 
MTSq., Newark— (ANG) Offi- 
(0-2/3) three openings in 
5C 1045B, D, Z, (0-2/3) four 
1535, and (0-2/3) one opening 
AFSC 5525. (0-2/3) 12 in 
*. Enlisted: 14 openings in 
5C A43570/90, two in A60630/ 
and 18 in A90250/70. 



sualn Staging Sq., 
J— (AFRes) 


McGuire 


•TTCER 

Grade No. 

0-2/3 3 
0-4 1 


9386 
9725 
9754 


0-4 1 
0-2/3 1 
0-1/2 8 


LISTED 

No. 

2 

1 


90290 
90270 
90250 


3 

10 
14 



NEW MEXICO 

FISq., Albuquerque — (ANG) 
cer: (0-2/3) four openings in 
SC 1125Z. 

NEW YORK 

iMTSq., Brooklyn— (ANG) Offi- 
(0-2/3) seven openings in 
SC 9754. Enlisted: six openings 
AFSC A43570/90 and 12 in 
1750/70. 

rac. Ftr. Sq., Niagara Falls — 
4G) Officer: (0-2/5) 18 open- 
l in AFSC 1115B. 
Ur Trans. Sq., Schenectady — 
4G) Officer: (0-2/5) 29 open- 
l in AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 19 
1535 and (0-2/3) 14 in 9754. 
isted: 12 openings in AFSC 
(570, four in A60750 and 27 in 
)250/70. 

CGp., Stewart AFB— (AFRes.) 



PFICER 

! Grade No. 

0-2 8 

0-3 1 

0-3 1 

0-3 1 

lO-2 1 



6476A 0-2 
6724 0-2 



7024 
9025 
9356 
9826 



0-2 
0-3 

0-3 



ENLISTED 



AFSC 

01090 

20470 

22351 

23250 

24150A 

24 170 A 

24270 

27150 

27170 

29150 

29170 

29352 

30150 

30452 

34250 

34270 

36150 

36152 

36250 

36350 

42151 

42450 

43151A 

A43151A 

43171A 

43190 

43271 

46150 

46171 

47150 

47151 

47153 

53150 

53250 

53350 

54350 

54550 

54570 

55170 

55250 

55251 

55270 

56350 

56370 

56550 

56570 

57150 



No. 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
6 
1 
9 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
8 
4 
13 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
4 
1 
9 



57170 

60270 

60350A 

60370 

62150 

62250 

62270 

62470 

64350A 

64370A 

64550 

64570 

64650 

64670 

64750 

64770 

64771 

65150 

65170 

67151 

67152 

67153 

67170 

67190 

68170 

68370 

68550A 

68570A 

70150 

70250 

70450 

70570 

71150 

72170 

73250B 

73270B 

74570 

75151 

75170 

90250B 

90370 

90470B 

90570 

90650 

90670 

90671 

90770 

90870 

98150 



3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
3 
3 

11 
1 
3 
4 
8 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 

21 
1 
1 
I 
I 
3 
2 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



138 Tac. Ftr. Sq., 

Officer: (0-2/5) 
AFSC 1115A. 



Syracuse — (ANG) 
11 openings in 



137 AMTSq., White Plains— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/3) six openings in 
AFSC 1045B, D, Z, (0-2/3) nine 
in 1535 and (0-2) seven in 9754. 
Enlisted: 16 openings in AFSC 
A43570/90, ten in A60750/70 and 
20 in A90250/70. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

156 AMTSq., Charlotte— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3) four openings in AFSC 
1535 and (0-2/3) six in 9754. En- 
listed: ten openings in AFSC 
A43570/90. 

NORTH DAKOTA 
178 FISq., Fargo— (ANG) Officer: 
(0-2/3) two openings in AFSC 
1124B. 

OHIO 

166 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Columbus— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) 11 openings in 
AFSC 1115B. 

164 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Mansfield— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) 16 openings in 
AFSC 1115A. 

162 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Springfield— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 16 open- 
ings in AFSC 1115A. 

112 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Toledo— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) 18 openings in 
AFSC 1115A. 

145 Air Refueling Sq., Wilmington 
—(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) ten open- 
ings in AFSC 1065B and (0-2/5) 
one in 1535. Enlisted: three open- 
ings in AFSC A43570/90. 

OKLAHOMA 
185 Air Trans. Sq., Okla. City— 

(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 22 open- 
ings in AFSC 1045B^ (0-2/5) 18 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) six in 9754. 
Enlisted: two openings in AFSC 
A6O750/70 and eight in A90250/70. 
937 TCGp., Tinker AFB— (AFRes) 

OFFICER 

AFSC Grade No. 1416 0-4 2 

1055C 0-3 2 1435Z 0-3 5 

1055C 0-2 4 6034 0-3 1 

1334 0-3 1 6724 0-2 1 



ENLISTED 



AFSC 

27150 

27170 

29150 

29170 

30171B 

34250E 

34270E 

36152 

36250 

36350 

40250 

A43570 

46150 

46151 

46171 

47151 

47153 

47170 

54570 

56350 

56370 

56450Z 



No. 

2 
1 
7 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
11 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 



56550 

56570 

57150 

57170 

60250 

62250 

62470 

64350A 

64370A 

64550 

64570 

64750 

64771 

75150 

67152 

67170 

68570A 

70250 

70450 

70570 

75151 

90270B 

90370 

90671 



125 Air Trans. Sq., Tulsa— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) 18 openings in 
AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 18 in 1535 
and (0-2/3) 13 in 9754. Enlisted 
two openings in AFSC A90250/70. 

OREGON 
123 FISq., Portland— (ANG) Officer: 
(0-2/3) two openings in AFSC 
1564 and (0-2/3) four in 1124B. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

140 AMTSq., Olmsted AFB— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/3) six openings in 
AFSC 1045B, D, Z, (0-2/3) ten in 
1535 and (0-2/3) 11 in 9754. En- 
listed: eight openings in AFSC 
A43570/90, 12 in A6O630/50 and 
20 in A90250/70. 

103 Air Trans. Sq., Philadelphia— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 20 open- 
ings in AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) ten 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) three in 9754. 
Enlisted: 12 openings in AFSC 
A43570 and 12 in A90250/70. 

146 FISq., Pittsburgh— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3) six openings in AFSC 
1125D. 

147 AMTSq., Pittsburgh — (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/3) two openings in 
AFSC 1045B, D, Z. 

RHODE ISLAND 
143 TCSq., Providence— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/5) seven openings in 
AFSC 1055Z. Enlisted: two open- 
ings in AFSC A29352. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 
157 FISq., Columbia— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3) four openings in 
AFSC 1125D. 

SOUTH DAKOTA 
175 FISq., Sioux Falls— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3) four openings in 
AFSC 1125D. 

TENNESSEE 

151 FISq., Knoxville— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3) ten openings in AFSC 
1125D. 

920 TCGp., Memphis— (AFRes) 
OFFICER 

AFSC Grade No. 

1055A 0-3 19 

1055A 0-2 38 

1334 0-3 2 

1435 0-3 9 



ENLISTED 
AFSC Grade No. 



20450 

20470 

22351 

23250 

241 50A 

24 170 A 

24270 

27150 

27170 

29150 

29170 

30151 

34250E 

34270E 

36150 

36350 

40250 

42450 

43151A 

A43151A 

43171A 



1 

2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 

10 
2 
6 
2 
1 
4 
4 
4 
2 
2 
4 
9 



1535 0-3 
1925 0-4 
6444A 0-2 
6746A 0-2 
8924 0-3 

56350 

56370 

56450Z 

56550 

56570 

57150 

60250 

60251 

60270 

60350A 

60351 

62150 

62250 

64350A 

64550 

64570 

64650 

64670 

64750 

64771 

65170 

67151 



A43171A 

43190 

43271 

43290 

46150 

47150 

47151 

47152 

47153 

53150 

53250 

54350 

54550 

54570 

55150 

55250 

55251 



6 

2 
6 
1 
3 
2 
11 
2 
2 
3 
1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
4 
3 



67152 

67153 

67170 

68170 

68370 

68570A 

70150 

70250 

70450 

73250B 

73270B 

73271 

74151 

75170 

77150 

90671 

98150 



2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
40 
6 
3 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
1 



155 Air Trans. Sq., Memphis — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 18 open- 
ings in AFSC 1045B, (0-2/5) 18 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) 14 in 9754. 
Enlisted: four openings in AFSC 
A43570, two in A60750/70 and six 
in A90250/70. 

105 Air Trans. Sq., Nashville— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 11 open- 
ings in AFSC 1045B. (0-2/5) 16 
in 1535 and (0-2/3) 12 in 9754. 
Enlisted: six openings in AFSC 
A43570. two in A60750/70 and 14 
in A90250/70. 

TEXAS 
111 FISq., Houston— (ANG) Officer: 

(0-2/3) five openings in AFSC 

1125D. 
182 FISq., San Antonio— (ANG) 

Officer: (0-2/3) eight openings in 

AFSC 1125D. 

UTAH 
191 Air Trans. Sq., Salt Lake City— 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) 21 open- 
ings in AFSC 1045B and (0-2/5) 
18 in 1935. Enlisted: eight open- 
ings in AFSC A43570. 

VERMONT 
134 FISq., Burlington— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3) three openings in 
AFSC 1564 and (0-2/3) two in 
1124B. 

VIRGINIA 
149 Tac. Ftr. Sq., Richmond— (ANG) 
Officer: (0-2/5) 14 opeings in 
AFSC 1115A. 

WASHINGTON 
116 FISq., Spokane— (ANG) Officer: 
(0-2/3) five openings in AFSC 
1564 and (0-2/3) three in 1124B. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

130 TCSq., Charleston— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (6-2/5) three openings in 
AFSC 1055Z and (0-2/5) four in 
1535. 

167 AMTSq., Martinsburg— (ANG) 
Officer: (6-2/3) four openings in 
AFSC 9754. 

WISCONSIN 

176 FISq., Madison— (ANG) Officer: 
(0-2/3) four openings in AFSC 
1564 and (0-2/3) four in 1124B. 

126 Air Refueling Sq., Milwaukee — 
(ANG) Officer: (0-2/5) ten open- 
ings in AFSC 1065B and (0-2/5) 
seven in 1535. 

WYOMING 
187 AMTSq., Cheyenne— (ANG) Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3) five openings in AFSC 
1045B, D, Z, and (0-2/3) two in 
9754. Enlisted: 15 openings in 
AFSC A90250/70. 



NASA 



The Manned Spacecraft Center of 
the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration at Houston, Texas, is 
seeking 10 to 15 exceptional, young 
pilots to participate in a training 
program which will eventually lead 
to their becoming Astronauts. Pilots 
selected will join the current astro- 
naut pilot pool in October and wili 
be based at the Manned Spacecraft 
Center. For details concerning eligi- 
bility qualifications and procedures 
for applying, see page 2. 



11 




Air to Ground communications are vital in 

CAP's emergency search procedures. 

Here, Cadet Sheila Armstrong oj the Los 

Alamos squadron uses a W alkie-Talkie. 




CAP'S 14,000-station communications 

network provides an immediate link 
between headquarters and participat- 
ing disaster relief organizations. 



Civil 
Air Patrol News 




W ithout Civil Air Patrol's vast 
communications system, one of this 
country's most vital emergency serv- 
ices would be almost nil. Recent 
tests proved the capabilities of the 
5 2 -wing net — the lifeblood of this 
"can do" civilian organization. 

This radio net is beginning to work 
more closely with Air Force Reserve 
Recovery units, Civil Defense, and 
other emergency and disaster relief 
organizations. Its strength lies in num- 
bers — more than 14,000 stations 
throughout each state, the District of 
Columbia and Puerto Rico. 

On frequencies allocated by the 
Air Force and authorized by the 
Federal Communications Commis- 
sion, CAP radio reaches out to every 
hamlet and farm. Even family kitch- 
ens, garages and autos of some mem- 
bers are equipped. Other CAP unit 
commanders keep tiny transceivers 
at their residence chairside. 

Last April, CAP National Head- 
quarters at Ellington AFB, Tex., 
conducted a nationwide CPX, or com- 
mand post exercise, to test its radio 
system. The CPX, supervised by Lt. 
Col. Donald C. Meyers, operations 
officer, and Maj. Robert G. Crabb, 
USAF, national director of communi- 
cations, was "extremely successful." 

This test followed a recent exer- 
cise during which CAP's capability 
of alerting Air Force Reserve Re- 
covery units, and joining them in 
transceiving, was checked. That re- 
sult: 70 percent of Reserve Recovery 
units responded in five hours; 93 per- 
cent by 23 hours. 

Here is a sample query transmitted, 
"What is the length of the runway at 
St. Joseph, Mo., municipal airport?" 
With St. Joseph the site of Missouri 
Wing headquarters, the answer was 
quickly obtained, but the message 
still had to be transmitted through 
North Central Region Headquarters 
at Minneapolis, Minn., to the wing, 
and then to a squadron to handle 




the request. Replies went the s; 
return route: from operating unit 
wing, to region, to headquarters. 

Most Civil Air Patrol wings h 
written agreements with their li 
Air Reserve Recovery units and C 
Defense agencies. These agreeme 
in many cases, specify the comm 
cations to be provided. In m 
places, CAP stations are located i 
Reserve Recovery units, Civil 
fense and law enforcement agent 

It is only through these rece 
instituted, nationwide tests that 
can determine areas where chai 
are required in methods of operat 
radio procedures, and where n 
training is required to bring a uni 
to par with its contemporaries, C/ 
communicator explained. 

"The national headquarters loc 
outside of Houston, is now opera 
on single sideband," Major Ci 
said, "And so is the Southwest 
gion Air Force Liaison Office in 1 
las (Station 6FRP). We hope to< 
vert all CAP-USAF stations to 
uniform net." 

It was explained that CAP-US> 
headquarters station can only cor 
Civil Air Patrol via the Air Fc 
CAP region headquarters liaison 
tions (numbers "1" through "8", 
lowed by call signs), which in 
can go out to the CAP wings (reg 
and wings have both Air Force 
CAP frequencies and equipme 
The messages then go on d 
through group, to squadron, o: 
flight, if necessary. 

CAP radio stations — now abl 
work with Air Force Reserve Re 
ery units and Civil Defense — ope 
throughout the regions and wing 
one or several of approximately 
frequencies which have various 
and time restrictions. Despite cei 
restrictions necessarily placed by 
FCC, CAP provides a most vital 
work for national control of its ei 
gency services capabilities. 



PEOPLE 

)r. Brockway McMillan, former 
stant secretary of the Air Force 
research and development, was 
irn in as under secretary of the 
Force by Secretary Eugene 
:kert on June 12. He assumes the 
t vacated by Dr. J. V. Charyk. 

rlaj. Gen. Winston P. Wilson, dep- 

chief of the National Guard Bu- 

j since 1955, has been named by 

sident Kennedy to succeed retir- 

Chief of the Bureau, Maj. Gen. 

W. McGowan, this August. It will 

the first time an Air Guardsman 

assume the Guard's Number One 

ition over nearly 400,000 Army 

I over 72,000 Air Guardsmen. 

Jrig. Gen. Royal Hatch will relieve 
g. Gen. Benjamin G. Willis as 
imander of the First Air Force 
ierve Region, Stewart AFB, N. Y., 
September 1. General Hatch 
les to the First Region from the 
\. Air Forces in Europe where he 
, deputy chief of staff for person- 
since May 1960. This will be his 
and active duty assignment with 
itinental Air Command. He was 
iuty commander for ANG affairs 
Hq CON AC (then at Mitchel 
B, N.Y.) from 1955 to 1960. 

Jrig. Gen. Jack A. Gibbs became 
th Air Force Reserve Region com- 
nder at Hamilton AFB, Calif., on 
y 1 replacing Brig. Gen. Andrew 
Cannon, who retired in May. He 
I served as deputy director of oper- 
)nal requirements at Air Force 
idquarters in Washington since 
itember 1961. 

Brig. Gen. Benjamin G. Willis, 

o has commanded the First Air 
rce Reserve Region since August 
51, will take over the Second Re- 
tt at Andrews AFB, Md., in Sep- 
iber. He relieves retiring Brig. 



Gen. Felix L. Vidal. A strong sup- 
porter of the Air Reserve Forces, 
General Willis recently made news 
(see May '63 AIR RESERVIST) 
when he turned over his command for 
15 days to Reservist, Brig. Gen. Ed- 
ward J. Haseltine and staff. 

Col. William F. McNeil, USAF 

Reserve officer on extended active 
duty, retired recently after more than 
22 years active duty. His last assign- 
ment was at the Pentagon as chief 
of the plans & policy division of the 
office of the Assistant Chief of Staff 
for Reserve Forces. Colonel McNeil 
was a guiding light and a forceful par- 
ticipant in the formulation of all the 
recent broad policy matters and sig- 
nificant actions affecting the Air Re- 
serve Forces. 

Maj. Irving G. Williams, 349th 
Troop Carrier Wg., Hamilton AFB, 
Calif., was recently selected as "Pilot 
of Distinction" by the Tactical Air 
Command, an honor not usually be- 
stowed upon a Reservist. He was 
cited for saving an aircraft and pos- 
sibly the lives of its crew, at the risk 
of his own life. He was co-pilot of 
a C-119 on a night flight when in- 
struments warned that its nose wheel 
gear was not in a safe '"down" posi- 
tion as they prepared to land. Dis: 
regarding his own safety, Major Wil- 
liams climbed out into the open gear 
housing 5,000 feet above the ground 
and forced the nose gear down and 
into a locked position. 

Capt. Grant S. Pyle III, 194th 
Fighter Interceptor Sq., Fresno, 
(Calif. ANG) recently received the 
Air Defense Command's "Well- 
Done" award. He was cited for his 
self-control, and airmanship during 
a mission earlier this year. Shortly 
after taking off over a heavily pop- 
ulated area, the engine of the cap- 
tain's plane began to lose power. 
Rather than jettison his external fuel 



tanks over the inhabited area, Cap- 
tain Pyle managed to maneuver his 
plane over a cleared spot before do- 
ing so. He was then able to return 
safely to base. 

1st Lt. Roger K. Schmitt, a former 

pilot with the New Jersey ANG's 
141st Tactical Figher Squadron, who 
is now assigned to the 389th TFSq., 
at Chaumont Air Base, France, re- 
cently became "Top Gun" of the 
366th TFWg. The youngest pilot, 
only 25, in his squadron, Schmitt 
won the distinction by placing first 
in the new gunnery criteria for pilots 
at the Wheelus AB, range in Libya. 
He made a clean sweep of all events 
with his F-84F Thunderstreak — in- 
cluding high angle bombing, skip 
bombing, rocketry, strafing (one pass), 
and Dart target. He also placed first 
in squadron gunnery competition at 
Libya and in France. 

SMSgt. Zenobia F. Zabielski, ser- 
geant major of the 8305th Air Force 
Reserve Recovery Group, Hartford, 
Conn., and the highest ranking WAF 
enlisted Reservist in that state, recent- 
ly received two major nominations. 
She was named Outstanding Air Re- 
serve Airman of her group and at the 
same time was selected as the Air 
Force Reserve's nominee for Hartford 
County's Honor Woman of 1962. 

TSgt. William S. Nash, 175th Tac- 
tical Fighter Group, Maryland ANG, 
won the .45 cal. service pistol cham- 
pionship in the 2nd Army Area Com- 
manders match at Ft. George G. 
Meade, Md., in April. The straight- 
shooting sergeant placed and won the 
following: 3rd place Open Warm-up 
Aggregate; 2nd place Master Center 
fire rapid fire; 2nd place Open .45 
cal. slow fire; 1st place Open .45 cal. 
National Match Course and the .45 
cal. Service Pistol Match. Sergeant 
Nash has been competing in small 
arms matches for a year and a half. 



CHANGES IN COMMAND 




General WILSON 

To Chief, National 

Guard Bureau 






General HATCH 

To Commander, 

First AFRes Region 



General GIBBS 

To Commander, 

Sixth AFRes Region 



General WILLIS 

To Commander, 

Second AFRes Region 



y> 



QUESTIONS & ANSWERS 




This column is designed to clarify problems of general 
interest to members of the Air Reserve Forces. Personal 
problems should be discussed with your unit personnel 
officer. Letters not used in the column cannot be answered. 

I am a Reserve officer involuntarily released from 
active duty in 1958. Am I eligible for the increased 
readjustment pay authorized by Public Law 87-509? 

PL 87-509 became effective when approved by the Presi- 
dent on June 28, 1962. The increased readjustment pay 
authorized by this legislation is payable only to Reservists 
involuntarily released from active duty after the date of 
its approval. It is not retroactive and does not apply to 
anyone released prior to that date. 

/ am assigned to NARS, Denver, Colo. I wish to be 
transferred to the Retired Reserve. What is the 
proper procedure? Applications for transfer or assign- 
ment to the Retired Reserve must be submitted by the 
individual on AF Form 131, Application for Transfer 
to the Retired Reserve. Members assigned to the Ineligible 
Reserve Section (IRS), Inactive Status List Reserve 
Section (ISLRS), or the Nonaffiliated Reserve Section 
(NARS) should forward their applications to the Air 
Reserve Records Center, 3800 York St., Denver 5, Colo. 

How may an airman on active duty with the Regular 
Air Force make application for a commission in the 
Air Force Reserve, or apply for a course to qualify 
him for commission? Air Force enlisted personnel on 
active duty may apply through their immediate com- 
mander to Continental Air Command or, if stationed over- 
seas, to the major commander having jurisdiction over the 
area in which he is stationed. However, direct appoint- 
ments in the Air Force Reserve are currently restricted to 
individuals qualified in the medical, chaplain and legal 
fields. We suggest you contact your unit commander for 
information concerning a school or further requirements 
for a commission. 

Recently another Guardsman told me that his com- 
pany gave him two weeks off in addition to his vaca- 
tion time to go to summer training and that when he 
was called to active duty during the Berlin crisis, 
his employer paid him the difference between his 
civilian and his military pay. I have to take my 
vacation time for summer camp and I've never 
heard anything about extra pay. Why is this? 
Employers are not required by law to offer you benefits 
such as you describe but many have realized that it is 
to their advantage to cooperate with the men who make 
sacrifices to protect them and have therefore developed 
programs to aid their Guardsmen-employees in every way. 

As an Air Force officer, I have completed my obli- 
gated period of service under the UMTS Act. Do / 
automatically receive a discharge from the AF Re- 
serves? No. All appointments and promotions made after 
July 19, 1952 are for an indefinite period. These appoint- 
ments tan be terminated only upon the officer's resigna- 
tion or for cause. 



/ work for a government agency and am designate 
a "key employee." A recent reorganization of tfi 
agency has given our office a mission which seen 
to take it out of the realm of essentiality to No 
tional Security. My position in the Guard is in donge 
because of this "key" designation. Is there air 
way I can have my designation reviewed an 
thereby be made available for mobilization? You 
first alternative is to see your immediate supervisor an 
request that he review your position and consider givin 
your unit a Certificate of Availability on you. Any furthe 
appeal must be addressed through military channels t 
the Department of the Air Force. 



AEROSPACE LIBRARY 




Reservists may obtain these books by mail order (at liste 
prices) from the Aerospace Book Club, 618 Mills Bld% 
17th and Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington 6, D. ( 
The Club offers members the opportunity to purchax 
certain of these and other aerospace books at substanth 
discounts. Reservists also may obtain recommended bod 
at reduced rate from the Air University Book Depart men 
Maxwell AFB, Ala. 

I'd Rather Be Flying, Frank Kingston Smith (Randoi 
House, $4.95). Written in easy to understand pilot tall 
this book describes the important steps in obtaining H 
instrument card. In addition, the single-engine pilot 
shown how to fly multi-engine planes. 

The Zeppelin In Combat, Douglas H. Robinson (She 
String Press, $9.00). A definitive story of the zeppelin, ii 
early history, construction and demise in combat (WWI 

Strike Command, America's Elite New Combat Tean 
Frank Harvey (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, $4.95). Th 
story of Strike Command, the new organization con 
posed of The Tactical Air Force (TAC) and Strategi 
Army Command (STRAC). 

Conflict In Space, M. N. Golovine (St. Martin's Pres 
$4.50). Surveys the costly American and Russian spac 
efforts in regards to their military implications. Conclude; 
"military as well as political supremacy may be gaine 
through space war without consuming the earth." 

Studies Of War, Nuclear And Conventional, P.M.! 
Blackett (Hill & Wang, $3.95). Author Blackett in h 
controversial book challenges the Western military polic 
of "atomic bomb" might, and claims the West is "n« 
glecting adequate preparation for land war." 

Rendezvous In Space, Martin Caidin (Dutton, $4.95 
The story of Man-In-Space Programs — Project Mercur 
Gemini, and Apollo, with a special section on the A 
Force X-20 Dyna-Soar astronaut-in-space program. 

A Study Of Communism, J. Edgar Hoover (Holt, Rim 
hart & Winston, $3.95). A disclosure of the Communi 
tactics and objectives including a portion relating to tt 
Communist operations in the U. S. 



u 



BRIEFL Y 



Miss Judy Sunday lends charm to 

bond drive conducted by 

Air National Guard's 112th Air 

Defense Wing at Greater 

Pittsburgh Airport, Pa. Aircraft is an 

F-102A, jet fighter-interceptor. 




fo outstanding Reserve air term- 
squadrons assigned to the Mili- 
Air Transport Service, have re- 
el approval from Headquarters 
F to perform their active duty 
eas this summer. The units are 
>lst Air Terminal Squadron at 
ire International Airport in Chi- 
and the 84th ATSq., of Charles- 
5. C. They will be picked up by 
~S ANG C-97s and moved re- 
ively to Hickam AFB, Hawaii, 
Chateauroux AS, France. This 
De a "first" and will involve ap- 
imately 200 officers and airmen 
will perform terminal squadron 
s at the MATS overseas bases. 

3PA promotions to permanent 
mant colonel recently went to 
7 Air Force Reserve officers, 
rds of 2,474 officers were con- 
ed with 801 deferred for the 

time and 56 others for the 
id. In a separate action, 44 fe- 
Reserve of the Air Force officers 

selected for ROPA promotion 
tie same grade. Included were 
lurses, 3 WAF and 1 medical 
alist. Promotions were also an- 
iced for 61 Reserve warrants. Of 



these, 13 were selected for W-4, 47 
for VV-3 and 1 for W-2. Six hundred 
ninety-three Regular and 88 Reserve 
warrants were considered. 

"Weekend Soundflights 63," a 
series of 15 five-minute radio pro- 
grams produced by Hq Continental 
Air Command and dedicated to the 
Air Force Reservist, were shipped to 
AM stations in the U.S., last month. 
The programs were also sent to 
field units to enable more effective 
local tie-in and support of Air Force 
Reserve recruitment and retention. 
The discs feature top bands, in- 
strumentalists and vocalists. Each 
show provides ample time for local 
unit spot announcements concerning 
Air Force opportunities. 

A C-97 of the 133rd Air Transport 
Squadron, 157th ATGp., (New 
Hampshire -A N G) transported 21 
members of the U.S. Army's "Sky 
Knights," official sky diving team and 
some 5,000 pounds of equipment to 
Le Bourget Air Base, near Paris, last 
month. The team traveled to Europe 
to participate in the world-famous 
Paris Air Show. 



Two Air Force Reserve C-124s 

and their crews also provided logis- 
tical support for the big international 
meet. A Globemaster from the 917th 
Troop Carrier Gp., Barksdale AFB, 
La., airlifted an en-route support 
team and ground support equipment 
to Paris for two participating Tac- 
tical Air Command T-38 fighters. The 
men and their equipment were re- 
turned to the U.S. following the show 
by a C-124 of the 442nd Troop Car- 
rier Wg., Richards-Gebaur AFB, Mo. 
The Paris missions are another ex- 
ample of the proficiency of our Air 
Reserve Forces in the world-wide air- 
lift capability of the USAF. 

Enrollment for the revised Squad- 
ron Officer School correspondence 
course has been reopened by the Ex- 
tension Course Institute. Any officer, 
Regular or Reserve, in the Armed 
Forces in the grade of major or below 
may now enroll. ECI no longer re- 
quires that applicants have at least 
two years of federal commissioned 
service. The revised course has five 
textbooks, a staff study, and two book 
reports. The institute has announced 
that chief and senior master sergeants 
will be allowed to enroll in this course 
after October. Revised course 5741, 
Firefighter Supervisor and Superin- 
tendent, and course 6403, Supply 
Services, are now available. 

Approximately 16,000 Reserve 
first lieutenants will be considered 
for promotion to captain by a board 
which will convene at the Air Reserve 
Records Center, September 9-20. To 
be eligible, officers must hold a pro- 
motion service date on or before 
Dec. 31, 1960, have a total years 
service date on or before Dec. 31, 
1957, and must have been in an ac- 
tive status for one year prior to the 
board's convening date. 

Thirteen Air Force Reserve C-119 
aircraft and 161 Reservists of the 
514th Troop Carrier Wing of Mc- 
Guire AFB, N.J. took part in last 
month's week-long Air Force and 
Army Alaskan summer exercise 
"Arctic Shore IV." The 514th is 
composed of Reservists from Con- 
necticut, Massachusetts, New York, 
Pennsylvania and New Jersey and 
is commanded by Col. C. Y. Jackson. 

Our caption writer got his titles 
mixed up in last month's Reserve 
Camera. He mistakenly listed Col. 
Bourne Adkison as commander of the 
349th TCWg., Hamilton AFB, Calif. 
Colonel Adkison is chief of staff of 
the Sixth Air Force Reserve Region. 
The 349th is commanded by Brig. 
Gen. Rollin B. m™*-» ^> ^- 



15 



Ira 



■BgHTH 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



Return Requested 




Brig. Gen. J. R. Dolny, commander of the 
133rd AT Wg., (Minn. ANG) talks 
to tower prior to C-97 flight from Scott 
AFB, III., to Azores. The 
aircraft was used to ferry MA TS Band 
for Armed Forces Day appearance. 



RESERVE CAMERA 

Loading mission bell on deck of 166th Air Transport Gp. (Del. ANG) 
C-97 which airlifted it from Dover AFB, Del., to Ramey AB, Puerto Rico, 
in May, are (l-r): SSgt. Carlton Money, 1 42nd ATSq., (using bar); and 
A3C Barry Ratlif], Henson Brooks, and Wayne McConnack, all of the 
1607th Air Terminal Sq. The bell was a gift of Fxplorer Scout Post No. 
99 of Wilmington, Del., to the United Presbyterian Church of San Sebas- 
tian, PR., in appreciation of hospitality tendered scouts during 1961 
visit to island. (|) Sky blossoms with St. Michael's Society chutists as they 
leave C-123 Providers of 445th ATWg., over Ft. Bragg, N.C. Over 1,000 
( atholie paratroopers took part in May jump honoring their patron, St. 
Mu had they were carried aloft by 33 aircraft of the 445th, Dobbins 
AFB, Ca., and 446th of Ellington AFB, lex. (3) Air Vice Marshal Arjan 
Singh, Indian Air Force vice chief of staff, inspects a 459th TCWg., C-l 19. 
The Vice Marshal recently was a guest of the 909th TCGp., and the 459th 
I ( Wg. t at Andrews AFB, Md. 



USAF Recurring Publication 3ffl 
No. 30-H-6-63-307.7&3 




'-de- •'• 



•• - 






0m ■ • * 



o 



f 



* 6-68-652600 











023* 7*i& 


Oyjs/ AUG.- SEPT. 1963 


WIFT STRIKE M 

LARGEST PEACETIME MANEUVER 
FOR 'COMBAT READY' REGULAR 
AND RESERVE FORCES... page 12 


I 






the air reservist^ 




OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE AIR RESERVE FORCES 






THE RESERVE 



MEDICAL PROGRAM 

...page 8 



the air reservist 

Vol. XV— No. 7 Aug./Sept. 1963 

AIR NATIONAL GUARD 
AIR FORCE RESERVE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 

EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 



The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of Hq USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, D.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq USAF. 




Our cover is dedicated to the most 
important quality of the Air Force 
Reserve Medical program— its "People." 
Their skills, training and dedication 
make the program a ready and valu- 
able augmentation force. Pictured is 
an actual group of Reserve medical 
specialists participating in their annual 
15-day tour of active duty for training. 



Sc(tnninfy^jy) * 

Training with business and industry. 




Aircraft mechanics and crash-crew firefighters of the 9522nd AFRR, 
Rochester, Minn., spent part of their 2-week active duty tour partiapa 
in CONAC's "Training With Industry" program. TSgt Vernon Wilkei 
and SSgt Fernando Himle use tools and equipment of local aviation com 



An Air National Guard unit and 
two Air Force Reserve units per- 
formed their two-weeks summer 
training in France and Hawaii. They 
became the first such squadrons to 
perform their annual active duty 
tours in an overseas area. 

The units are the 84th Air Ter- 
minal Sq., Greenville, S.C., which 
went to France; the 91st Air Termi- 
nal Sq., O'Hare IAP, Chicago, 111., 
and the headquarters squadron of 
California ANG's 146th Air Trans- 
port Wg, Van Nuys, Calif., both of 
which went to Hawaii. 

The 91st was selected by MATS 
as its Western Transport Air Force's 
outstanding Reserve air terminal unit 
and was ordered to conduct this 
year's active duty tour with MATS 
1502nd ATermSq., at Hickam AFB. 
The squadron commander, Maj. 
John Tracy and members of his unit 
arrived in Hawaii on the night of 
July 27 aboard two C-97 aircraft of 
the 109th Air Transport Sq., of the 
Minnesota Air National Guard. Dur- 
ing their two-week tour 91st person- 
nel actually operated MATS Hickam 
terminal while 1502nd personnel ob- 
served. The terminal, one of the busi- 
est in the Pacific, handles an average 
of some 7,500 passengers and 765 
tons of cargo monthly. 



The 84th Air Terminal Squa 
picked as MATS Eastern Trail 
Air Force's outstanding Reserv 
terminal unit, departed Green 
S.C., on August 10 aboard two ( 
of the 133rd Air Transport Sq., 
Hampshire ANG. Unit persi 
and their commander, Maj. E 
L. Walker, arrived at Chateau 
France, the following afternooi 

During their overseas tour, 
sonnel assisted MATS 1616th 
port Squadron at Chateaurou: 
the movement of personnel, frj 
cargo and mail through the loca 
minal facility. The 1616th is o 
14 operating units in 11 cou 
maintained by the 1 602nd Air 1 
port Wg., at Chateauroux. 

The two Reserve units wen 
lowed by California ANG's 
Air Transport Wg., which bfi 
the first ANG unit to send its 
headquarters squadron out d 
continental U.S. They spent 
annual two-week summer ent 
ment, August 17-31, in Hawaii 
squadron integrated into the lj 
Air Transport Wing at Hickam i 
Honolulu. The remainder oi 
wing, the 146th Air Transport 
remained at Van Nuys Air Nzj 
Guard Base during that peril 
support more than twenty C-97 
to the Far East and Europe. 



annual Air Force Associa- 
convention will be held at 

iheraton Park Hotel in Washing- 
D. C, Sept. 11-13. The con- 
on will bring together AFA 
:rs, Air Force personnel, indus- 
jxecutives, educators, members 
le Reserve Forces and govern- 

officials who will participate in 
various programs, 
me of the events scheduled for 
onclave include: 

An Aerospace Panorama of Air 
B equipment and exhibits around 
i various symposiums and sem- 

will be held. 

An Aerospace Education sem- 
in which leading educators have 

invited to participate. 

A 16th Anniversary of the Air 

; Luncheon. 

Reserve Forces Seminar. 

An Honors Night during which 

anding individuals and units of 

Vir Force will be recognized by 

\ir Force Association and the 

al presentation of the Air Force's 

tanding Airmen. 

•ntinental Air Command will 

a Commanders' Conference at 
nternational Inn in Washington, 
?ptember 1 1 . 

rement after 20 years of 
tically all Reserve officers 

ig on active duty in the grades 
)lonel and below was recently 
unced. The Air Force said it 
scrapping its Project 20-10 and 
ting the concept that the max- 
l active duty career for Reserve 
rs is normally 20 years of ac- 
federal military service. Project 
3 was instituted as a means of 
:ing Reserve officer strength 



through retirement of certain persons 
completing 20 years service, 10 of 
which were commissioned. 

The continued maturing of the 
active duty officer force in terms of 
service and grade, combined with ex- 
isting and proposed strength and 
grade ceilings, make it impossible 
hereafter to retain any substantial 
number of Reserve officers on active 
duty beyond the 20 year point, except 
in special cases. 

June 30, 1964 is set for the first 
such retirements. 

A new traveling Retention and 
Recruiting Coordinators' pro- 
gram has been established to aid 
Air Force Reserve manning. In the 
past, efforts of Reserve units in re- 
taining and recruiting Reservists have 
been tailored to local needs. The 
new program is designed to take ad- 
vantage of the best of individual pro- 
grams while insuring uniformity 
throughout the Air Force Reserve. 

To handle the program Conti- 
nental Air Command has established 
a separate Reserve retention and re- 
cruiting branch within the assign- 
ments and procurement division of 
the directorate of Reserve personnel. 
This branch will spearhead retention 
and recruiting activities of the com- 
mand and will provide a focal point 
for analysis of manning trends, re- 
view of existing policies and the de- 
velopment of new policies. 

At each of CONAC's 16 Air Force 
Reserve Sector headquarters an active 
duty sergeant has the sole duty of 
maintaining contact with active duty 
bases which operate separation cen- 
ters, recruiting service offices, and the 
Reserve units within the geographical 
boundaries of their individual sectors. 



CONAC's round-the-clock effort 
labelled "CON TAC," has re- 
sulted in Reserve troop carrier air- 
craft and crews airlifting 13,700,000 
pounds of cargo and 15,000 passen- 
gers during its first 16 months. 

The program is a cooperative ef- 
fort with Tactical Air Command and 
has been in operation since March 
31, 1962. (See AIR RESERVIST, 
Jan. '63). It began with 10 Reserve 
crews on duty at all times to assist 
TAC by providing airlift on an im- 
mediate and continuing basis to carry 
passengers and cargo in support of 
TAC's mission. The Reservists vol- 
unteered for short tours of active 
duty to perform the missions, ordi- 
narily serving for nine days at a time. 
This same set-up still prevails under 
normal circumstances. 

The number of crews and planes 
participating at any one time varies 
as circumstances change. For in- 
stance, the international situation 
may bring changes in requirements 
and may affect the number of aircraft 
and crews available. 

Crews from all 15 Reserve troop 
carrier wings take part, using C-119, 
C-123, and C-124 aircraft. 

CON TAC provides valuable train- 
ing for Reservists by furthering their 
combat capability through perform- 
ance of "live" missions with cargos 
of immediate tactical importance. 
This not only aids CONAC's mission 
of assuring combat readiness of the 
Air Force Reserve, but also provides 
needed airlift capability for TAC. 

CON TAC is in addition to the 
missions routinely assigned for air- 
borne support training. 



see SCANNING next page 



■y-;V. , 



. Training overseas. 

Jr terminal functions at Hick- 
FB, Hawaii, were handled 
s first time fay Air Force Re- 
s of the 91st Air Terminal 
"licago, III., during their sum- 
aining period. (2) Air Force 
ists of the 84th Air Terminal 
reenville, S. C, also trained 
as for the first time, (l-r) 
on Commander, Maj. Ernest 
', is met by Brig. Gen. 
D. Forman, Col. Robert 
e, and It. Col. Floyd 6. Hil- 
id, upon arrival at Chateau- 
Mr Station, France. 




Scanning 




Monitoring a high frequency circuit are A1C William V alter and A2C Thomas 
Switalski, 251st Comm. Gp., Springfield, Ohio. They were part of four thou- 
sand members of four Air National Guard mobile communications groups who 
participated in communications exercise, Long Haul II that ended Aug. 31. 



Exercise Long Haul II, a two- 
phase communications exercise 

involving some 4,000 communicators 
of the four ANG mobile communica- 
tions groups, ended August 3 1 . 

The Air Force Communications 
Service posed the problem of estab- 
lishing and maintaining a highly mo- 
bile radio communications network 
which could function during wartime. 
Selected military installations in the 
eastern and central states were tied 
into the mobile radio system and the 
Air Force Communications network 
during the period July 13-27. 

Thousands of teletype and voice 
messages were passed through the 
system. 

ANG Communications units par- 
ticipating in the first phase were: the 
251st Communications Gp. (Mobile), 
Springfield, Ohio, consisting of the 
263rd CommSq. (Trib team), Badin- 
Wadesboro, N.C.; 264th CommSq. 
(Trib team), Chicago, 111.; 269th 
CommSq. (Trib team), Springfield, 
Ohio and its detachment relay cen- 
ter, Zanesville, Ohio; 223rd Radio 
Relay Sq., Hot Springs, Ark. and 
225th Radio Relay Sq. Gadsden, Ala. 

Also the 253rd CommGp. (Mo- 
bile), Wellesley, Mass., consisting of 
the 267th CommSq. Relay Center, 
Wellesley; 271st CommSq. (Trib 
team), Harrisburg, Pa.; 274th Comm 
Sq. (Trib team), Roslyn, N.Y.; 224th 
Radio Relay Sq., St. Simons Island, 
Ga.; and the 265th Radio Relay Sq., 
of S. Portland, Maine. 

Military installations in the western 
states were tied together during the 



second two-week training period of 
Long Haul II. Taking part were: the 
252nd CommGp. (Mobile), Spokane, 
Wash., consisting of the 142nd 
CommSq. (Relay Center), Portland, 
Ore.; 262nd CommSq. (Trib team), 
Beliingham, Wash.; 143rd CommSq. 
(Trib team), Boeing Field, Wash.; 
244th Radio Relay Sq., Portland, 
Ore. and the 221st Radio Relay Sq., 
of Garland, Tex. 

Also the 162nd CommGp. (Mo- 
bile), N. Highland, Calif., consisting 
of the 147th CommSq. (Relay Cen- 
ter), Van Nuys, Calif.; 148th Comm 
Sq. (Trib team), Compton, Calif.; 
149th CommSq. (Trib team), N. 
Highland, Calif.; 222nd Radio Re- 
lay Sq., Santa Ana, Calif., and the 
261st Radio Relay Sq., of Van Nuys. 

The seventh annual AFRes 
troop carrier competition will 

be held Sept. 8-11 at Clinton County 
AFB, Wilmington, Ohio. Forty-two 
crews from 14 troop carrier wings 
will compete, flying C-119s and C- 
123s. The competition is a CONAC- 
wide exercise in which the three best 
crews from each wing compete, as 
individual crews and as a three-crew 
team. All aircraft from each team 
will fly a low level navigation mission 
followed by a 1500 foot air drop of 
heavy equipment. Each team will 
also send three aircraft on a medium 
altitude night navigation flight to test 
navigation and proficiency at drop- 
ping 340 pound bundles. A third re- 
quirement will be to fly in formation 
and drop parachutists. 



Mutual exchange of Rcsirvisi 
and active Air Force at Dove 1 

AFB, Del., solved two problems xt\ 
cently. The 1607th Civil hnginoj 
Squadron at the big Delaware bat* 
needed the services of a profe iofl 
mechanical engineer. The 9498th A 
Force Reserve Squadron needed real 
istic training situations to prepare H 
men for a new "Base Support Sen 
ices" mission it was pioneering. Man 
of its Reservists are engineers enl 
ployed by leading chemical construe 
tion and electrical industries. 

Lt. Col. W. D. Schweinsberg, con 
mander of the 9498th offered tt 
services of the Reservists to the civ 
engineering squadron commander, If 
Col. Walter H. Thaxton. A prograr 1 
was begun to utilize the skills of tr 
Reserve officers as an integral par 
of their training. 

Coordinating workload scheduli 
of the engineer squadron with tr 
training periods of the Reservists w» 
the primary problem which had I 
be solved. The Reservists trained 9 
the second weekend of each monfj 
The squadron, except for emergena 
crews, does not work weekends. 

Examination of the engineerir. 
problems, however, showed that til 
primary need was for profession! 
evaluation, planning, and advice c! 
base engineering projects. It wt 
found that if the paper work, spec 
fications and plans for the projeci 
were made available to the Reservis 
during their weekend training perioc 
they could provide the required ei 
gineering service despite the absenc 
of active duty personnel. 

Since the beginning of the progra 
last March, eleven members of th 
9498th have contributed more tha 
294 man-hours of engineering cot 




. . . Training as a tean 

(1) Calif, units: 149th Comm. ! 
(ANG,) 82nd and 87th Air Ten 
Sqs. (AFRes,) and 1501st ATrai 
Wg. (MATS,) proved effectivem 
of teamwork in Operation Tri| 
Play. 87th Reservists load tru< 
mounted radio aboard MATS C-V. 

(2) USAF's experiment in usi 
civilian skills of Reservists fir 
Majs. Walter Prettyman (I) J 
Warren Auch, 9498th AFResS 
Dover AFB, Del., evaluating c< 
dition of steam heating plant 
USAF's 1607th Civil Eng. Sq., ■ 
Dover AFB. 



ant services to the base. They have 
r ked on facility maintenance and 
)rovement projects ranging in com- 
>city from simple improvements to 
ingar heating system to moderniza- 
1 of the base sewage disposal plant. 
The Reservists are currently work- 
on the design of an improved 
•ling system for the emergency 
ver generator at the base hospital, 
ginal plans called for a new well 
supply cooling water for the gas- 
le engine-powered unit. Investiga- 
1 however, showed that the engine 
Id be cooled much more econom- 
ly by a radiator. 

Commenting on the work per- 
iled by the Reservists, Mr. J. W. 
ite, chief of the engineering 
nch of the civil engineer squad- 
, said, "This group constitutes the 
st valuable source of technical ad- 
; we have found to assist us in 
intaining Dover's facilities. They 
a gold mine of talent." 

^e ANG squadrons compete 
USAF's Ricks Trophy in a 

nbat test at Shaw AFB, S.C., Sep- 
iber 3-8. Units selected to par- 
pate are the 172nd TacReconSq., 
tie Creek, Mich.; the 165th, Louis- 
;, Ky.; 154th, Little Rock, Ark.; 
'th, Hutchinson, Kans., and 
Ind, Reno, Nev. 

Yews of RB-57 photo reconnais- 
ce aircraft will test their abilities 
ill phases of their duties from pre- 
it procedures to processing and 
:rpretation of target photographs, 
lie Ricks Trophy event, one of 
USAF's major competitions, is 
1 in conjunction with the Air 
ce Association's annual conven- 
i. The winning crew will be AFA 
sts at the convention. 



"Operation Triple Play" com- 
bined the capabilities of three 

Reserve and one Air Force unit dur- 
ing the weekend of July 20-21, in one 
of the first exercises of its type ever 
conducted by Reservists. Taking part 
were the 149th Communications Sq., 
California ANG, from North High- 
lands; the 87th Air Terminal Sq. 
AFRes of McClellan AFB; and the 
82nd Air Terminal Sq. AFRes of 
Travis AFB, Calif, and the 1501st 
Air Transport Wg., MATS. 

The operation involved the com- 
plex problem of airlifting the 149th, 
its men and equipment from Mc- 
Clellan to Travis where the 149th 
"Tiger Cat" team set up its equip- 
ment and tied into the California 
ANG communications network as 
they would do in a real emergency. 

The 149th personnel and 17 tons 
of equipment were processed and 
loaded aboard a C-124 by the 87th 
ATermSq. at McClellan, flown to 
Travis by the 1501st ATWg., and off- 
loaded by the 82nd ATermSq. The 
process was reversed on the second 
day for the flight back. 

Col. Francis E. Holsclaw, com- 
mander of the parent 162nd Comm. 
Gp., commented, "We hope to have 
more of these live missions in the fu- 
ture, not only for the valuable train- 
ing they provide, but also for the fine 
cooperation we see between regular 
Air Force, Reserve, and ANG units." 

A resolution commending the 
United States Air Force and the 

Miliary Air Transport Service for 
utilizing the Air Reserve Forces more 
efficiently and realistically was adopt- 
ed by the American Legion, Depart- 
ment of Illinois, during its 45th an- 
nual convention at Chicago. 



The resolution, which will be for- 
mally presented to the national con- 
vention of the Legion convening in 
Miami, Fla., Sept. 6-12, specifically 
cited MATS and its commander, 
Gen. Joe W. Kelly for strengthening 
the nation's defense posture through 
its active Reserve program. 

Among the points stressed in the 
resolution was MATS training of Air 
Reserve terminal squadrons in over- 
seas areas where they would be util- 
ized in the event of world emer- 
gency, thereby increasing the capa- 
bilities of the squadrons to perform 
their duties; and the scheduling of 
Air Force Reserve Rescue Squadrons 
to be trained outside the continental 
U.S., making these units more pro- 
ficient in their humanitarian duties. 

New courses, one in the field of 
air traffic control and the other 

in the wire maintenance field have 
been activated by the Extension 
Course Institute of Air University. 
They are Air Traffic Control Funda- 
mentals (2720A) and Dial Central 
Office Equipment Specialist (Step- 
by-step and X-Y) (3635). 

The former introduces the student 
to the federal system of air traffic 
control and describes the duties of 
an air traffic controller. The course 
covers aircraft navigational aids, 
communications procedures, air traf- 
fic regulations, control procedures 
and the effects of weather on control. 

Course 3635 describes the equip- 
ment used for the operation of the 
Step-by-step and X-Y dial systems 
and explains the operation of the 
switching equipment, power ringing 
and supervisory equipment, testing, 
routine testing procedures and trou- 
ble location. 




Scanning^jjy) 




(1) ANG's 119th FtrGp., Fargo, N. £>., flight crews got ditching-procedure 
training with help of H-43 from Det. 1 of USAF's Central Air Rescue Center. 



A test of MATS' world-wide mo- 
bility concept took Air Force 

Reserve's 303rd Air Rescue Squad- 
ron from March AFB, Calif., to 
Puerto Rico, in June. The mission 
required the 303rd to set up a Res- 
cue Control Center at Ramey AFB, 
P.R., and to conduct training exer- 
cises under operational conditions. 

Four 303rd HU-16B amphibians 
and two C-119 supporting aircraft 
from the 452nd Troop Carrier Wing, 
participated. Leaving March AFB, 
they flew to Puerto Rico by way of 
Kelly AFB, Tex., Brookley AFB, 
Ala. and Homestead AFB, Fla. Two 
of the aircraft were forced to make 
emergency landings during the early 
part of the trip, but after engine re- 
pairs by Reserve ground crew per- 
sonnel, were able to continue to 
Puerto Rico without further incident. 

Upon arrival at Ramey AFB, a 
Rescue Control Center was estab- 
lished and the 303rd was declared 
ready and able to assist as a combat 
ready organization in any emergency 
that might have arisen. 

Several training missions were 
flown around the island to familiar- 
ize the crews with landing strips and 
terrain of Puerto Rico. On June 
19 the Coast Guard requested the 
assistance of the 303rd in a search 
for a missing Barbados fishing boat 
with three persons aboard. A 303rd 
HU-16B searched an area some 500 
miles to the south for six hours with 



negative results. 

Lt. Col. Reg L. Anderson, squad- 
ron commander, presented a scroll 
for Governor Luis Munoz Marin of 
Puerto Rico, which cited "apprecia- 
tion for the hospitality and coopera- 
tiveness extended to the members of 
the 303rd by the people and officials 
of Puerto Rico." 

Computation of retirement 
points for Air Force Reservists 

may become a simple matter with 
the adoption of a "programmed in- 
struction" course prepared by five 
Reserve officers. 

The five-man team was brought 
to the Air Reserve Records Center 
in Denver, Colo., for a 30-day active 
duty tour as part of an Air Force 
study to find more effective and eco- 
nomical means to train personnel. 

Headed by Lt. Col. Ray F. Wahl, 
9544th Air Reserve Sq., Allentown, 
Pa., other team members are Lt. Col. 
Robert R. McEmber, 9592nd Air 
Reserve Sq., Lafayette, Ind.; Maj. 
Edward W. Solomon, 8651st Air 
Force Reserve Recovery Gp., San 
Francisco, Calif.; Capt. Harvey C. 
Hirschi, 9380th Air Reserve Sq., Salt 
Lake City, Utah, and Capt. William 
G. Woods, 9607th AFRRSq. of Wal- 
la Walla, Wash. 

When approved, their course will 
be used to instruct Reservists and 
other personnel concerned with com- 
putation of retirement points. 



A new AFROTC officer educj 
tion program curriculum will b 

tried at 10 selected colleges and un 
versities across the country durir 
the 1963-64 academic year. 

The curriculum (OE 300) is ce^ 
tered on the growth and developmei 
of aerospace power and the role ( 
the professional Air Force officer 
protecting the nation's security. N« 
only basic textual support, but ah 
a wide sampling of current milita^ 
literature will be used in suppo 
of educational objectives. 

The 10 schools selected for tl 
trial program are: Lowell Techni 
logical Institute (Mass.); Newai 
College of Education (N.J.); Florit 
State University; University of 111 
nois; University of Buffalo (N.Y. 
Drake University (Iowa); Colle; 
of St. Thomas (Minn.); Lousiai 
Polytechnic Institute; Colorado Sta 
University, Occidental College, Cal 

The OE 300 curriculum was d 
veloped in anticipation of the passa, 
of legislation for the Officer Ed 
cation Program. OE-400 will '; 
given during the second year. 

The courses will be conducted 
a manner similar to that in high lev 
college research courses. 

Meanwhile, Air Commando trai 
ing for AFROTC members is nd 
authorized. Among the first to volu| 
teer for Tactical Air Command's sfl 
cial air warfare program were 
juniors from Rutgers University. 




Capts. Charles Kirtland (I), Edw 
Sherhurn, 303rd A ir Rescue Squadrt 
flew gifts to Puerto Rican childn 



RIEFLY... 



bntinental Air Command's 1962 
und safety record showed an im- 
vement in all categories. Last year 

the second straight year in which 
military ground accident fatalities 
e recorded in the command. The 
2 private motor vehicle rate 
wed a downward trend of 87 per- 
t as compared with the 1960-61 
od. The USAF motor vehicle 
in the command was down 
)2 percent in comparison with the 
le period. Military injury rates 
pped 52.77 percent and the civil- 
rate was down 3.58 percent while 

per capita dropped 1 3 percent. 



lew York City's 9215th Air Re- 

e Sq. was recently commended 

their "outstanding contribution to 

Air Force information program," 

Gen. William F. McKee, Air 

ce vice chief of staff. The com- 

ldation, the seventh received by 

squadron, was for the planning 

conducting of a two-day seminar 

November for over 100 active 

f information officers. 



selection board will meet at 
dquarters USAF on September 16 
elect and recommend Reserve of- 
rs for promotion to the permanent 
le of captain. All active duty of- 
s, including warrants holding Re- 
e commissions, and ANG officers 
JD and non-EAD) will be con- 
red. Those officers with a promo- 
service date of December 31, 
or earlier and a total years serv- 
date of December 31, 1957 or 
ier, will be considered. 



rotection of their job rights dur- 
annual training periods is not au- 
atic, Reserve Forces personnel 
; recently advised by the Labor 
artment. The requirements are: 

Guardsmen and Reserves must 
lest leave of absence for training 
rder to qualify for job protection. 

Employers are obligated to 
it such leave. 

The law prohibits employers 

requiring employees to take 

" vacations at the time their an- 

training periods are scheduled. 

Employees returning from mili- 
training are entitled to reemploy- 
t with the same seniority, status, 

and vacation rights they would 
: if they had not been absent for 
ling. 



A screening board to determine 
Reserve officers to be considered for 
assignment to Reserve general slots, 
convened at the Air Reserve Records 
Center, August 19. The screening is 
a preliminary step to Reserve gen- 
eral officer selection. Except for 
those now assigned to a Reserve gen- 
eral's position, all non-EAD (ex- 
tended active duty) Reserve colonels 
eligible will be considered. 



sistant to the commander, 26th Air 
Division, Hancock Field, N. Y.; Brig. 
Gen. Dale E. Shafer Jr., commander, 
121st Tactical Fighter Wing, Ohio 
ANG; and Brig. Gen. Kenneth E. 
Keene, assistant adjutant general for 
air of the Indiana ANG. 



A number of high ranking military 
officials, including Secretary of the 
Air Force Eugene M. Zuckert, are 
scheduled to address the 85th Gen- 
eral Conference of the National 
Guard Association of the United 
States, to be held at Philadelphia, Pa., 
Sept. 30 through Oct. 3. More than 
3,000 delegates are expected. 



Six general officers, four of them 
members of the Air Reserve Forces 
were recently appointed to the Air 
Reserve Forces Policy Committee by 
Secretary Eugene M. Zuckert. 

Those named to the 18-man com- 
mittee which serves as the advisory 
group to the Secretary on Air Reserve 
policies, were: Maj. Gen. Thomas E. 
Moore and Maj. Gen. George B. 
Greene Jr., director of personnel 
planning and director of military per- 
sonnel, respectively, on the staff of 
Hq., USAF DCS/Personnel; Brig. 
Gen. Nicholas E. Allen, deputy com- 
mander of the 2nd AF Reserve Re- 
gion, Andrews AFB, Md., Brig. Gen. 
J. Clarence Davies Jr., M-Day as- 



A discarded metal "No Smoking" 
sign has helped make a Civil Air Pa- 
trol plane airworthy, thanks to the 
ingenuity of Reservists assigned to 
the 600th Air Base Sq., at Mitchel 
AFB, N. Y. A piece of the sign is 
now the underside of the WWII L- 
16s carburetor heat box. The small 
plane, which had been grounded since 
it was donated to a New York CAP 
unit in 1958 was completely rebuilt 
during summer encampment by Re- 
servists of the 600th's aircraft main- 
tenance section. The job cost the 
CAP a fraction of what it would have 
if it had been done commercially. 



A policy change affecting all non- 
prior servicemen between the ages of 
17 to 18Vi was recently announced 
by the Department of Defense. These 
enlistees will now be obligated to 
serve six years instead of the previ- 
ous eight. Now all personnel up to 
26 years will have a six year obliga- 
tion. Also, instead of the six-month 
initial period of active duty, the direc- 
tive establishes a variable period rang- 
ing from a minimum of four months 
to a maximum which is determined 
by the job for which a man trains 
and the time required to train him. 



tllllilllllliiliiiilllillllUllllllIllllllUIIIlIiiiilllillllllliilllll 




Operational readiness as depicted above, earned MATS' "Outstanding Im- 
provement" awards for the 33rd and 47th AFRes Aeromed Evac Sqs. of the 
7th Aeromed Evac Gp. All took 2 -week training together for first time. 
iiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinin 



L 



PLANNING for the defense of 
America, the possibility of a nuclear 
attack, or involvement in a "police 
action" is an everyday consideration. 
Any such engagement includes the 
hazards of injury or diseases for the 
people who push the buttons, fly the 
planes, man the ships, shoot the guns, 
or supply the support of the many 
kinds needed to fight and win. As a 
result, medical forces of military serv- 
ices and their Reserve components 
have taken on added significance. 

The continental United States is 
now in the frontline: any pre-attack 
time factor may be non-existent. Con- 
sequently, our war -winning capability 
now hinges more directly on the post 
attack posture of the military forces. 
Immediate responsiveness of military 
capability is essential. Manpower 
(well trained and strategically dis- 
persed) and equipment (in -being and 
survival-sited) will be vital factors in 
striking back and winning. The Medi- 
cal Service of the Air Force Reserve 
is dedicated to making a forceful con- 
tribution to this objective. 

The basic mission of the Air Force 
Reserve Medical Service is to aug- 
ment the Active Air Force wherever 
and whenever necessary in providing 
the medical support to maintain the 
highest degree of combat readiness 
and effectiveness. 

Organizationally, the Air Force 
Reserve medical program is adminis- 
tered by the Command Surgeon, Hqs, 
Continental Air Command, and con- 
sists of units having separate missions. 

As an instance, the province of the 
tactical hospitals of the Air Force Re- 
serve includes surgery under field or 
combat conditions as well as a limited 
diagnostic and therapeutic application 
of general medicine for personnel of 
the combat-tactical units. These tac- 
tical hospitals are integral sections of 
the Reserve troop carrier wings. They 
involve more than 1 ,000 doctors, den- 
tists, veterinarians, medical adminis- 
trators, and medical technicians. 

Medical personnel are also assigned 
to aeromedical evacuation units spe- 
cially-trained to provide not only in- 
flight medical care but administrative 





THE RESERVE 

... an augmentation force whose mission 



and operational ground support as 
well. These units are organized for 
worldwide deployment. They are also 
responsible for the operation of evac- 
uation control centers and liaison 
with related medical activities. 

There are 14 Reserve Aeromedical 
Evacuation units in the United States 
with authorized personnel of more 
than 1,700 — mostly nurses and air- 
men. Their training is a combination 
of in-flight experience and on-the- 
ground instruction. Flight and ground 
training have three phases, of which 
Phases I and II require a minimum 
of 100 hours flying time. 

The largest number of Reserve 
medical personnel are found in train- 
ing programs "on the ground." Over 
7,000 spaces are authorized for medi- 
cal personnel to train in hospital serv- 
ices and casualty staging functions. 
Training is conducted to improve 
technical skill and consists of class- 



room instruction and on-the-job tn 
ing. All hospital services are inclu< 
in this training. 

As in every other phase of the 
Force Reserve program, people 
the most important ingredient. 
Medical Service of the Air Force 1 
serve includes all the medical di, 
plines: doctors, nurses, dentists, ^ 
erinarians, medical specialists, adn 
istrators and technicians. Each p 
forms an important function in 
accomplishment of the overall miss 
of his unit, and each is a valua 
member of the Air Force Reserve 

These are the Air Force Rese 
physicians — flight surgeons, spec 
ists, and general practitioners. A\i 
with the other men and women 
the Reserve Medical Service, t 
form a medical team of exceptio 
ability. Their reservoir of military 
civilian experience is indispensable 
the Reserve's medical effort, 



fp 



1 




m\j 



v 





ICAL PROGRAM 

s with each advance in weapon technology. 



iany of them welcome the oppor- 
unity to enlarge their knowledge 
hrough special tours in aerospace 
nedicine at the USAF Aerospace 
Medical Center, Brooks AFB, Tex. 

A further prospect open to Reserve 
>hysicians, often unavailable to them 
n private practice, is the opportunity 
o teach. It is, in fact, a responsibili- 
y. Medical technicians must con- 
tantly increase their knowledge and 
kills and their source for this is the 
levoted physicians in their units. 

The techniques of in-flight care, the 
)rocessing and nursing of wounded 
svacuees and hospital patients are the 
pecial domain of the Air Force Re- 
erve Nurse Corps. 

Although the vital services of nurses 
ire much the same as those of civilian 
ife, the refinements of in-flight patient 
are in the aero-medical evacuation 
Jnits is a departure from most civilian 
lursing. Nurses must not only learn 



the special techniques of in-flight care, 
but also act as team leaders, super- 
vising, teaching, and evaluating the 
proficiency of the medical technicians 
assigned with them. Nurses who qual- 
ify may attend the Flight Nurses 
Course at the USAF Aerospace Medi- 
cal Center in Texas. There they are 
taught the theory and practical care 
of sick and injured in flight, and they 
earn the silver wings of a flight nurse. 
Opportunities to acquire new tech- 
niques, improve specialized talents, 
and advance in the nursing profession 
— military and civilian — are abun- 
dantly present in the Nurse Corps of 
the Air Force Reserve. Reserve 
nurses continue to live their everyday 
civilian lives while simultaneously 
helping the Air Force build its reser- 
voir of trained men and women whose 
professional proficiency is indispensa- 
ble in the "cold war" and might well 
prove decisive in a hot one. They are 



The skills and training of members of the 
Air Force Reserve Medical Program 
make it a valuable factor in 
Air Force's "total force" concept. 



a select group, sharing a common 
uniform, common vocations, and a 
common goal. 

Dietetics, occupational and physi- 
cal therapy, are the concern of the Air 
Force Reserve's Medical Specialist 
Corps. The trained hospital dieticians 
must solve the multitude of therapeu- 
tic food problems confronting airmen 
patients throughout the world. Am- 
putations, fractures, burns, arthritis, 
poliomyelitis, injuries of the spinal 
cord, and related conditions, are now 
dependent for rehabilitation on the 
skilled techniques of the professional 
therapists. The work of these highly 
trained professionals is closely aligned 
with that of surgeons and specialists 
in physical medicine. 

The Air Force Dental Service em- 
ploys all necessary measures of pre- 
vention and care, including research, 
development and analysis to provide 
a complete dental service. 

Veterinary officers are highly es- 
sential members of the Air Force pub- 
lic health team. Their work is pre- 
ventive in nature which represents 
savings in money, food, and lives. 

They are engaged in food inspec- 
tion, animal service, food service and 
environment sanitation. 

Behind the medical staff stand the 
administrative and skilled general 
service personnel. Efficient manage- 
ment is essential in all Reserve units 
and Medical Service Corps officers 
provide this vital service. 

Also essential to the mission of Re- 
serve Medical Units are the Medical 
Technicians. These airmen contrib- 
ute greatly to the direct and indirect 
care of patients through their assist- 
ance to the professional staff. 

A critical evaluation of Air Force 
Reserve readiness came during the 
1961 and 1962 recalls of selected 
units and their medical support ele- 
ments. Their reaction and perform- 
ance prompted Secretary of the Air 
Force, Eugene M. Zuckert, to write, 
to Congress: "They were ready. The 
splendid response of these men was 
in accord with the finest traditions of 
military service, and they are indeed 
a credit to their country." 






Officer and enlisted vacancies in the following Air Force Reserve units have been consolidated and are listed by Mate Petition* offer u 
to 48 paid drills, a 15-day tour of active duty annually, retirement points, and possible promotion. Applicants should write directly t ( 
unit of choice, giving full name, address, grade and AFSC. 




LEGEND: To identify officer vacancies, 0-2 stands for First Lieutenant; 0-3 for Captain; 0-4 for Major; 0-5 for Lieutenant Colonel. Where opemnj 
exist in the same Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) for more than one grade, the lowest and highest grades are mdicated. Example: 0-2/ 5 rr,ear 
there are openings for grades First Lieutenant through Lieutenant Colonel. Enlisted: The AFSC identifies both the job and the ski I level. As an exampl, 
the #5 in 42450 indicates openings for Staff Sergeants and Airmen First Class in the disaster control career field. Similarly #9 refers to Chief and Seme 
Master Sergeants, and #7 to Master and Technical Sergeants. 



ALABAMA 
908 TCGp., Bates Field (AFRes) Of- 
ficer: (0-2/3) one opening in AFSC 
1055Z and (0-2/3) one in 1535. 
Enlisted: One opening in AFSC 
271X0, 702X0 and 75170. 
CALIFORNIA 

942 TCGp., March AFB (AFRes) Of- 
ficer: (0-2/3) one opening in AFSC 
1055Z and one in 1535. Enlisted: 
One opening in AFSC 571X0, 
565X0 and 43151A. 

943 TCGp., March AFB (AFRes) Of- 
ficer: (0-2/3) one opening in AFSC 
1055Z and one in 1535. Enlisted: 
One opening in AFSC 571X0, 
291X0 and 43171A. 

944 TCGp., March AFB (AFRes) Of- 
ficer: (0-2/3) one opening in AFSC 
1055Z and one in 1535. Enlisted: 
One opening in AFSC 643X0A, 
571X0 and 241X0A 

349 TCWg., and 938 TCGp., Hamil- 
ton AFB, Calif., have vacan- 
cies in the following AFSCs: Offi- 
cer-AFSC (1055Z), (1535) and 
(6424). Enlisted requirements in- 
clude: AFSCs: 271X0, 571X0, 
43151A, 291X0 and 582X0. A total 
of 100 slots are available. For 
further details, write: Hq, 349th 
TCWg. — AFRes, Hamilton AFB, 
Calif. 

940 TCGp., McClellan AFB, Calif., 
has urgent need for 100 new mem- 
bers, with many NCO ranks avail- 
able. This expansion is due to the 
coming conversion to C-124 air- 
craft. Regular MATS support Re- 
serve flights to the Far East are to 
be established. Openings exist in 
the following positions: Pilots, air- 
craft maintenance, loadmasters, 
flight engineers, personnel, radio, 
supply and others. Personnel may 
receive cross training. This unit is 
a flying organization, with 48 pay 
periods and a 15-day tour, in the 
group's own aircraft and facilities. 
For details write: 940th TCGp., 
Group Personnel Section, McClel- 
lan AFB, Calif, or call WA 2-1511, 
ext. 25246. 

CONNECTICUT 
905 TCGp., Bradley Field (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening in 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 1535. En- 
listed: One opening in AFSC 
43171A, 43151A and 62250. 

FLORIDA 

915 TCGp., Homestead AFB (AF- 
Res) Officer: (0-2/3) one opening 
in AFSC 1055Z and one in 1535. 
Enlisted: One opening in AFSC 
565X0, 571X0 and 622X0. 
GEORGIA 

918 TCGp., Dobbins AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening in 
AFSC 1055A and one in 1535. En- 
listed: One opening in AFSC 27430, 
324X0 and 42450. 

ILLINOIS 

928 TCGp., OHare AP (AFRes) Of- 
ficer: (0-2/3) one opening in AFSC 
1055Z and one in 1535. Enlisted: 
One opening in AFSC 431X1A, 
607X0 and 57IXO. 

932 TCGp., Scott AFB (AFRes) Of- 
ficer: (0-2/3) one opening in AFSC 
1055Z and one in 1535. Enlisted: 
fine opening in AFSC 431XIA, 
702X0 and 643X0A. 
INDIANA 

9.vi rCGp., Bakalar AFB (AFRes) 

Officer: IO-2 1) one opening in 
Al SC I0SS/. and one in 1535. En- 
listed One opening in AIS( 
4MXIA. 571X0 and 702X0. 
•Ml TCGp., Bakalar Alii (AFKcs) 
Officer <0-2 1) one opening in 
AFS( 10557. and one in 1535. 



Enlisted: one opening in AFSC 
431X1A, 571X0 and 702X0. 

LOUISIANA 

917 TCGp., Barksdale AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening in 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 1535. En- 
listed: One opening in AFSC 43570, 
702X0 and 643X0A. 

926 TCGp., New Orleans NAS 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) one open- 
ing in AFSC 1055Z and one in 
1535. Enlisted: One opening in 
AFSC 29352, 274X0 and 242X0. 

MARYLAND 
909 TCGp., Andrews AFB (AFRes) 
Officer (0-2/3) one opening in 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 1535. En- 
listed: One opening in AFSC 
274X0, 431X1A and 643X0A. 
9211 AFRRSq. Baltimore, Md., has 
approximately 45 vacancies in 
many career fields, for both officer 
and airmen. For details write: 
9211th AFRRSq. (ATTN: Capt. 
Salganik), Martin-Marietta Co. AP, 
Baltimore 20, Md. 
2nd AFRR, Andrews AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-4) one opening in 
AFSC 6834. 

The 2nd AFRR, also has one va- 
cancy for an Air Force Academy 
Liaison, Part III, field grade offi- 
cer for duty in the Washington, 
D.C., area. Non-pay position offers 
15-day annual tour of active duty 
and retirement points. For details 
write: 2nd AFRR, Andrews AFB, 
Md., or call Information Office, 981- 
9811, ext. 6876. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

901 TCGp., L. G. Hanscom Field 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) one open- 
ing in AFSC 1055Z and one in 
1535. Enlisted: One opening in 
AFSC 43151A, 70250 and 57150. 
MICHIGAN 
403 TCWg., Selfridge AFB (AFRes) 
OFFICER 1535 0-2 9 

AFSC Grade No. 1535 0-3 3 

1055ZO-2 18 1916 0-5 1 

1055ZO-3 10 7016 0-4 1 

1055Z 0-4 1 8016 0-4 1 

1334 0-2 1 8816 O-S 1 

1435Z 0-2 3 9016 0-4 1 

ENLISTED 47151 4 

AFSC No. 47153 1 

20450 1 54350 1 

20470 1 56530 1 

23250 1 57130 4 

24150A 1 57150 4 

24170A 1 57170 2 

24270 1 60251 1 

27430 3 60331 2 

29150 2 A60730 2 

29150 1 A60750 6 

A29352 6 A60750 1 

30170 1 A60770 1 

30454 1 62150 1 

34250E 1 62250 1 

36350 2 62470 1 

42131 1 64771 1 

43151A 6 64790 1 

43151A 5 70450 2 

A43151A 5 70470 1 

43171A 1 70590 1 

46131 1 75150 1 

46171 1 75170 2 

47150 1 90470B 1 

47151 3 90850 1 

927 TCGp., Selfridge AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening in 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 1535. En- 
listed. One opening in AFSC 
431X1 A, 571X0 and 607X0. 

MINNESOTA 

934 TCGp., Minn.-St. Paul IAP 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) one open- 
ing in AFSC 1055Z and one in 
l^is. F.nlisted: One opening in 
AFSC 242X0, 274X0 and 704X0. 

MISSOURI 

935 TCGp., Richards-Gebaur AFB 



(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) one open- 
ing in AFSC 1055C and one in 
1535. Enlisted: One opening in 
AFSC 43570, 643X0 and 60750. 
936 TCGp., Richards-Gebaur AFB 
(AFRes) Officer (0-2/3) one open- 
ing in AFSC 1055C and one in 
1535. Enlisted: One opening in 
AFSC 43570, 643X0A and 60750. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

902 TCGp., Grenier Field (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening in 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 1535. En- 
listed: One opening in AFSC 
43151 A, 70250 and 27150. 

NEW JERSEY 

903 TCGp., McGuire AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening in 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 1535. En- 
listed: One opening in AFSC 
43171A, 43151A and 62250. 

NEW YORK 

904 TCGp., Stewart AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening in 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 1535. En- 
listed: One opening in AFSC 
43171A, 43151A and 62250. 

914 TDfip., Niagara Falls MAP 

(AF' r?) 

OFFICER 4335 0-3 1 

AFSC Grade No. 5525 0-3 1 

1055Z 0-2/3 10 6444A 0-2 1 

1435Z 0-3 5 6476A 0-2 1 

1535 0-2/3 1 6724 0-2 1 

1925 0-4 1 7024 0-2 1 

ENLISTED 

AFSC No. 56530 3 

20470 1 56550 5 

24270 1 56570 1 

27130 2 57130 12 

27150 2 57150 8 

27170 1 57170 1 

27430 3 58130 1 

29131 1 58230 1 

29150 8 58250 1 

29350 1 60250 1 

34250E 2 60270 1 

34270E 1 60320A 2 

36150 1 60331 2 

36152 2 60350A 1 

36350 2 60730 5 

42133 1 62230 3 

42173 1 62250 3 

42250 1 64250 3 

42450 2 64330A 2 

43131A 25 64350A 7 

43151A 7 64550 13 

43171A 6 64570 2 

43231 1 64630 2 

43250 1 64650 6 

43251 2 64670 3 

46130 1 64730 3 

46131 1 64750 1 
46150 1 64771 

47150 1 64790 

47151 2 67152 

47152 2 67190 

47153 1 68170 
53150 1 68370 
53350 1 68570A 
53430 1 70230 

54350 1 70250 2 

54550 1 70450 

54570 1 73250B 

55230 1 73271 

55250 1 74151 

55251 1 74170 
56350 2 75170 
56370 1 77130 
56450Z 1 90230 

OREGON 

939 TCGp., Portland IAP (AFRes 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening in 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 1535. En- 
listed: One opening in AFSC 
204X0, 241X0A and 291X0. 
PENNSYLVANIA 

911 TCGp., Greater Pittsburgh AP 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) one open- 
ing in AFSC 1055Z and one in 
1535. Enlisted: One opening in 
AFSC 274X0, 43IX1A and 643X0A. 



912 TCGp,. NAS Willow Grc 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) one op< 
ing in AFSC 1055Z and one 
1535. Enlisted: One opening I 
AFSC 431XIA, 271X0 and 5713 

913 TCGp., NAS Willow Grt 
(AFKes; Officer: (0-2/3) one op< 
ing in AFSC 10557. and one ~ 
1535. Enlisted: One opening 
AFSC 431X1A, 271X0 and 571? 

TENNESSEE 

919 TCGp., Memphis MAP <AFR 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 15 
Enlisted: One opening in AF 
43131A, 57130 and 64330A. 

920 TCGp., Memphis MAP (AFR 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 15 
Enlisted: One ooening in AF 
43131A, 57130 and 64330A. 

TEXAS 

916 TCGp., CarsweJl AFB (AFR 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 15 
Enlisted: One opening in AF 
57150, 62250 and 70250. 

921 TCGp., Kelly AFB (AFR 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 15 
Enlisted: One opening in AF 
291X0. 571X0 and 64^X0. 

922 TCGp., Kelly AFB (AFR 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 15 
Enlisted. One opening in 603? 
471X0 and 461X0. 

923 TCGp., Carswell AFB (AFR 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 15 
Fnlisted: One openine in AF 
291X0, 431X1A and 901X0. 

924 TCGp., Ellington AFB (AFR 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 15 
Enlisted: One opening in AF 
29352. 274X0 and 242X0. 

925 TCGp., Ellington AFB (AFR 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 15 
Enlisted: One opening in AF 
29352, 274X0 and 242X0. 

UTAH 

945 TCGp., Hill AFB (AFRes) O 
cer: (0-2/3) one opening in AF 
1055Z and one in 1535. Enlistt 
One opening in AFSC 431X1 
571X0 and 565X0. 

WASHINGTON 
941 TCGp., Paine AFB (AFR 
Officer: (0-2/3) one opening 
AFSC 1055Z and one in 15' 
Enlisted: One openina in AF: 
271X0, 643X0A and 902X0. 
WISCONSIN 
933 TCGp. , Gen. Mitchell Fi( 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/5) one opi 
ing in AFSC 1055Z and one 
1535. Enlisted: One opening 
AFSC 242X0, 274X0 and 704> 

RECOVERY GROUPS-AFRes 
A substantial number of active dt 
non-commissioned officers in perse 
nel and administrative fields will 
needed as a result of recent revisic 
in airman advisor requirements I 
Air Force Reserve Recovery Grou) 
Continental Air Command has 
nounced. 

The advisor program has be 
standardized and each group is n< 
authorized one TSgt, AFSC 646' 
MSgt. 73270. SSgt, 70250. In ad 
tion, groups which support more th 
three recovery squadrons will ha 
another 73270 TSgt. The standardi: 
tion brinus a definite need for ad' 
tional airmen in AFSCs 73270 a 
70250, E-5 through E-7. 

Airmen applying should do so i 
der provisions of AFM 35-11. Chi 
ter 18, Part Two. Applicants will r 
be assigned to areas other than the 
for which they volunteer. 



10 



XEOPLE 



OUTSTANDING AIRMEN 




Sergeant McCARTHY 



SMSgt Lawrence P. McCarthy of 

e 115th Fighter Gp., Madison, 
isconsin ANG, and SSgt. Kenneth 
, Bracken of the 9204th Air Force 
;serve Recovery Sq., Johnstown, 
4 have been named "Outstanding 
irmen" of the Air Reserve Forces. 
The two airmen competed with 
ousands of other Air Guardsmen 
d Reservists for the coveted award, 
iteria for selection is based, among 
her things, on contributions to both 
e military service and to the corn- 
unity in which the airmen reside. 
Sergeant McCarthy, the Air Na- 
)nal Guard's choice, is first ser- 
ant of the 1 1 5th's Materiel Squad- 
n, a part of the 128th Air De- 
nse Wg., based at Truax Field, 
uring his ANG service he has 
insistently displayed outstanding 
ill. In addition to regular drills, 
e sergeant spends an average of 10 
)urs a month of his personal time 
administrative details for his 
(uadron. He was recently corn- 
ended by the 128th Air Defense 
'ing's inspector general for his su- 
jrvision of squadron training re- 
jirements. Sergeant McCarthy is 
so active in local community af- 
irs, including explorer scout and 
lurch work. 

SSgt. Kenneth N. Bracken, Air 
orce Reserve's Outstanding Airman, 
:rves as information specialist for 
ie 9204th AFRRSq at Johnstown. A 
>rmer staff photographer for the 
leveland Ohio Press, and sports edi- 
•r and photographer for the Shamo- 
in (Pa.) Citizen, he remains active 
i the field of journalism through his 




Sergeant BRACKEN 



Reserve assignment and free-lance 
photographic efforts. 

His Reserve accomplishments in- 
clude production of a newspaper and 
a series of 16mm. motion pictures 
depicting the mission and activities 
of his unit. 



1st Lt. Robert DeLapp of Cam- 
bridge, Mass., probably holds this 
year's Reserve record for having tra- 
veled the longest distance, over 3,000 
miles, to attend the annual two-week 
active duty tour of the 9116th 
AFRRSq. at Grenier Field, N. H. 
DeLapp and his wife were vacation- 
ing in England when "duty called" 
and he hopped back across the At- 
lantic to his weather officer position 
with the 9116th. 



Maj. Gen. Albert T. Wilson, Jr., 

former deputy commandant, Indus- 
trial College of the Armed Forces in 
Washington, has assumed the post 
of vice commander of the Continental 
Air Command. He succeeds Maj. 
Gen. Harold R. Maddux who retired 
last June. His postwar service in- 
cludes tours of duty with Headquar- 
ters USAF in Washington and 
USAFE headquarters in Germany. 
He also served with MATS in Ger- 
many and the U.S. General Wilson 
was senior member of the United 
Nations Military Armistice Commis- 
sion at Yongsan, Korea in 1958. 



Brig. Gen. James H. Isbell, for- 
merly chief of staff for the Conti- 
nental Air Command, became com- 
mander of the Second Air Force Re- 
serve Region, Andrews AFB, Md. 
on August 1, filling the position cre- 
ated by the retirement of Brig. Gen. 
Felix L. Vidal. Brig. Gen. Benja- 
min G. Willis, who was originally 
slated for that command, retired Au- 
gust 31. General Isbell was pro- 
moted to his present rank on Au- 
gust 7. He had served as CONAC 
chief of staff since July 1962. 



Col. Howard F. Nichols, Conti- 
nental Air Command's deputy chief 
of staff for plans, became its chief 
of staff on August 1, succeeding Brig. 
Gen. James H. Isbell. He came to 
CONAC after a tour as deputy direc- 
tor of the Near East-South Asia-Afri- 
ca Region, Office, Assistant Secretary 
of Defense, Internal Security Affairs, 
in Washington. 



CHANGES IN COMMAND 






General WILSON 



General ISBELL 



Colonel NICHOLS 



11 



Plotting boards as well as their HU-16 "Albatross" 

aircraft were used by members of 

Air Guard's four new Air Commando Groups 

to accomplish unconventional warfare missions. 







SWIFT 
STRIKE 




/&&'■ ' 



Owift Strike III, the Air Force 
and Army joint exercise which pro- 
vides realistic peacetime training for 
the combat-ready Regular and Re- 
serve Forces of the United States, 
officially began at 4:50 on the morn- 
ing of July 21st. 

The maneuver was the largest U.S. 
Strike Command joint training exer- 
cise to date, and supporting ground 
and air movements took place at 
more than two dozen U.S. air bases. 
The actual ground maneuver area 
(some 5,800,000 acres of land) was 
located in North and South Carolina, 
with support air bases in Georgia and 
Tennessee. 

Approximately 100,000 men of the 
U.S. Strike Command, Air National 
Guard and Air Force Reserve par- 
ticipated in the maneuver. 

Swift Strike III provided a com- 
plete test of the joint air-ground task 
force concept represented by the U.S. 
Strike Command. STRICOM was 
organized in October 1961, and 
maintains operational control of all 
combat-ready Tactical Air Command 
and Continental Army Command 
forces in the United States. Com- 
manded by Army Gen. Paul D. 



Adams, this mobile, flexible and 
highly trained force operates directly 
under the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and 
may be used for rapid deployment 
to any part of the world for opera- 
tions ranging from a show of force 
to limited and even all-out war. 
STRICOM forces also are trained 
and equipped to reinforce U.S. over- 
seas commanders if required. 

Almost 10,000 vehicles and 2,000 
airlift missions were used to trans- 
port troops from 28 states to the 
maneuver area. The Military Air 
Transport Service, with a firm assist 
from its Reserve Forces, accounted 
for the largest of these airlifts, haul- 
ing 8,000 men and 8,000 tons of 
equipment from Colorado to bases in 
the Swift Strike area. In all, MATS 
and its Reserve Forces units ac- 
counted for transporting about 20,- 
000 men and 12,000 tons of equip- 
ment during the exercise. 

An important secondary purpose 
of Swift Strike III was its use as a 
testing ground for new concepts, pro- 
cedures and equipment being used 
by the Air Force and the Army. 
Some of the testing involved Air 
F : orce's Direct Air Support Center 



(DASC), the Tactical Air Contr 
Center (TACC), improved aerial d 
livery systems, Combat Control Tea 
communications equipment and fie 
mobility and capability for reco 
naissance operations. 

One such test conducted at 
Swift Strike III exercise was an ir 
proved technique of battlefield ft 
resupply. If adopted, it could revol 
tionize both conventional and unco 
ventional warfare operations, 
demonstration was carried out 
Air National Guardsmen and STR 
COM forces under the direction 
Brig. Gen. Donald J. Smith, Chi 
of Staff for Air, Illinois Air Nation 
Guard. The demonstration was t 
first public showing of a KC-97 aeri 
tanker being used for refueling a^ 
resupply of ground forces. 

The new technique permits t 
huge aerial tanker to land at a remc 
airstrip, refuel aircraft, leave su 
plies for either ground or aviatl 
units and leave within 15 minute 
The tanker can either refuel the a 
craft themselves or transfer its ft 
supply into fuel bladders, either pi 
positioned or carried aboard 
tanker aircraft, from which 



12 



laller aircraft can be refueled. 

To transfer the fuel, the tanker 

sw merely places an attachment to 

e tanker's refueling boom. The at- 

:hment can be designed to feed fuel 

a number of hoses. In one previ- 

s demonstration, for instance two 

ises were hooked to the boom, and 

lewmen refueled two aircraft at the 

ime time. The aircraft also has the 

^pability of refueling jet fighters with 

| single-point refueling system. 

As much as 12,000 gallons of fuel 
|.n be transported, and can be trans- 
rred at a rate of 900 gallons a 
inute, according to General Smith. 
In addition to the fuel, the KC-97 
in carry other cargo and when emp- 
:d can be used for air evacuation. 
Another first was the use of the 
ir National Guard's four, newly re- 
:signated Air Commando Groups, 
rmerly troop carrier groups. The 
ur units are the 129th, Hayward, 
alif.; 130th, Charleston, W. Va.; 
55th, Baltimore, Md., and the 
13 rd, Providence, R. I. The first 
ir Reserve Forces' units to be so 
:signated, the Air National Guard's 
mimando groups fly the HU-16 
Ubatross," and are trained under 
e guidance of the Special Air War- 
re Center at Eglin AFB, Fla. Air 
ommando training includes conven- 
jnal weapons delivery, night and 
ly airdrops, sod-field operations, 
id skip-bombing. 

As an instance of Air Guard ac- 
uity during Swift Strike III, nine 
ews of the 135th Air Commando 
roup, Baltimore, Md., flew a varie- 
of "cold war" missions and also 
sre the subject of an Operational 
eadiness Inspection by a ten-man 
am from Tactical Air Command 
:adquarters and three representa- 



tives from the Special Air Warfare 
Center. Upon completion of the in- 
spection the TAC report contained 
special commendations for aircrew 
training, proficiency, and for records 
maintenance. Four of the crews in- 
spected were given a capability rat- 
ing of 99 percent. 

Augmenting Red and Blue forces 
were Air Forces Reservists from 16 
troop carrier groups of the Continen- 
tal Air Command. Thirteen of the 
groups flew the C-l 19s and the other 
three used the C-l 23 type aircraft. 
The participating troop carrier groups 
were: 901st, L. G. Hanscom Field, 
Mass.; 902nd, Grenier Field, N. H.; 
906th and 907th, Clinton County 
AFB, Ohio; 930th and 931st, Baka- 
lar AFB, Ind.; 932nd, Scott AFB, 111.; 
915th, Homestead AFB, Fla.; 908th, 
Bates Field, Ala.; 933rd, General 
Mitchell Field, Wise; 934th, Minne- 
apolis-St. Paul International Airport, 
Minn.; 912th and 913th, USNAS Wil- 
low Grove, Pa., and the 914th, Ni- 
agara Falls Municipal Airport, N. Y. 
The three C-l 23 groups were: 918th, 
Dobbins AFB, Ga., and the 919th 
and 920th at Memphis Municipal 
Airport, Tenn. 

Reservists from these units flew 
more than 1,300 sorties, airdropping 
6,000 paratroops, landing 5,000 in- 
fantrymen, and transporting some 
3,000 tons of cargo. 

Air Guard C-97 and C-l 21 trans- 
ports worked with the CALSU (Com- 
bat Airlift Support Unit) at Sewart 
AFB, Tenn. The units were: 197th 
Air Transport Sq., Ariz.; 146th 
ATWg., Calif.; 142nd ATSq., Del.; 
183rd Aeromedical Transport Sq., 
Miss.; 180th ATSq., Mo.; 133rd 
ATSq., N. H., 139th ATSq., N. Y.; 
137th ATWg., Okla., and the 105th 
and 155th ATSq., Tenn. 



Aircraft control and radar surveil- 
lance was provided for both the Blue 
Home and Red Aggressor forces by 
Air Guardsmen. The 157th Tactical 
Control Gp., with headquarters in 
Missouri and units in Georgia, Ten- 
nessee, Iowa, Alabama and Wiscon- 
sin, supported the Red Aggressor 
forces while the 152nd TAC Control 
Gp., with headquarters in New York 
and units in Massachusetts, Pennsyl- 
vania, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and 
Ohio supported Blue Home forces. 

A major contribution to the exer- 
cise was made by Air Guard's tactical 
fighter and tactical reconnaissance 
aircraft. Tactical Fighter Groups 
participating were: 107th, N. Y.; 
184th, Kans.; 102nd and 104th, 
Mass. The Tactical Reconnaissance 
Groups were: 186th, Miss.; 127th, 
Mich.; 190th, Kans.; 117th, Ala.; 
191st, Mich., and the 123rd, Ky. 

Air Guard tactical fighter forces 
used the F-86 and F-100 aircraft 
while the tactical reconnaissance units 
used RF-84F and RB-57 aircraft. 

Air Force Reserve Recovery units 
proved their versatility during Swift 
Strike III. The Recovery Reservists 
performed the functions of combat 
support units while their personnel 
received on-the-job training in skills 
they need for their recovery mission. 

Three of the Recovery squadrons, 
the 9313th, Laurenburg, N. C, the 
9314th, Spartanburg, S. C, and the 
9315th from Anderson, S. C, served 
in direct support of STRICOM's di- 
rector-controller base at Spartanburg. 

Two other Recovery squadrons, 
the 9305th from Winston-Salem, 
N. C. and the 9306th from High 
Point, N. C, augmented the Swift 
Strike forces at a deployment site 
located at Bush Field, Augusta, Ga. 







lir Guardsmen of the 157th Tactical Control Gp., ANG, 
t. Louis, Mo., hold communications meeting under field 
onditions at Red Force's Bush Field, Augusta, Ga. 



Air Force Reserve troop carrier wing C-l 19s (above) 
and C-l 23s furnished drop support of equipment and 
men of the Army's 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions. 



13 






r^i*f 



f 




41k. 1 






K 




(L) Hawaiian CAP Cadets tour D.C. before visiting eight 
foreign countries under Cadet Exchange program (R) 
Banquet for Cadets, sponsored by Pan American Airways 



ir. 

in D.C, was attended by: (l-r) Col. Paul Turn 
Vance Hartke, Congressman William St. Onge 
man Blake and CAP Commander, Col. Paul C. 



^^i 



er, Senate 
Mr. Noi 

Ash wort i 



CIVIL KIR PATROL NEWS 



T, 



HREE months ago the first of 
some 8,000 Civil Air Patrol cadets 
packed up uniforms, sports clothes, 
tennis rackets, swim suits, etc. and 
headed for the highlight of their sum- 
mer vacation period — the annual 
CAP wing summer encampment. 

Fifty-two CAP wings, from all 50 
states, Puerto Rico and the District of 
Columbia were hosted at some 35 
Air Force bases. There the cadets, 
both boys and girls, got an inkling of 
the life an airman lives. They fol- 
lowed the rigorous training schedule 
of regular Air Force airmen, aping 
the airman from reveille to retreat, 
using his training facilities, following 
in his drilling footsteps, attending or- 
ientation courses and relaxing with 
the abundant recreation facilities in- 
herent to every Air Force base. 

A formal and tightly run schedule 
of training, aerospace education and 
indoctrination is the basis of the 
CAP summer encampment. Far from 
being a vacation in the true sense of 
the word, it is nevertheless a prized 
and cherished highlight in the CAP 
cadet's life. The encampment is an 
intense training period, with hard 
work either on the drill field or in 
the classrooms daily. Even that can 
be, and is, thrilling as well as educa- 
tional and instructive to the cadets. 

Attending a CAP summer encamp- 
ment is a privilege — not a right — and 
the Air Force opens its bases and their 
complex training facilities to these 
youngsters for the serious business of 
giving these air-minded youth an in- 



side look at the role and importance 
of the aerospace Air Force. 

Within the wings, squadrons and 
flights of CAP, the opportunity to at- 
tend one of these summer encamp- 
ments is a highly sought after and 
prized opportunity. To be selected, 
each cadet must meet rigid training 
requirements and have attained spe- 
cific educational stature. 

The summer encampment training 
program, no less thorough and metic- 
ulous, is designed to give the cadets 
the maximum in aerospacfe education 
and indoctrination. The program is 
designed by Air Force officers, coop- 
erating with CAP, and once at an 
Air Force installation the cadet is re- 
quired to adhere to all rules and regu- 
lations governing the encampment. 

Each cadet meets all personal ex- 
penses incurred during the encamp- 
ment. Food and clothing is paid for 
by the cadet before his arrival. The 
cadets do not enjoy purchase privi- 
leges of the base commissary and are 
limited in the articles which they may 
purchase in the base exchange. They 
still contest hotly for the privilege to 
attend the summer encampment. 

The cadet's average day during en- 
campment begins at reveille, usually 
about 5:30 a.m. They embark upon 
a whirlwind schedule, minutely timed 
and crammed with activity. 

All is not work, train and drill, for 
the duty day always ends and then 
the cadets turn to recreation and 
entertainment. Evening activities are 
under the supervision of the tactical 



officers, senior officers of CAP. P; 
ties, jukebox dances, softball, bai 
ball, tennis and swimming are recrf 
tional outlets to which the cadets c 
turn for their evening relaxatic 1 
Promptly at 10:30 or 11 p.m. I 1 
"lights out" call is sounded and ( 
cadets are ushered back to barrac 

Behind all this are months of 
tense planning and programming, 
volving the active Air Force, the /i 
Force Reserve, the Air Nation 
Guard and Hq CAP-USAF. Ti 
cadets are not unmindful of this a 
to each element they extend heartf 
thanks for the toil and effort of t 
personnel who make the summer ( 
campment a reality each year. 

The cadet whose home is rem( 
from the training site and whose he 
of attending, once he has achieved t 
goal of having been chosen by 
wing to participate, is probably m< 
aware of the supporting role whi 
Air Force Reservists play in maki 
the encampment possible for him. 

As he arrives at the designat 
pick-up location, usually an 
Force or Air Force Reserve or A> 
base in the vicinity of his home, 
often gets his first realization of 1 
close-knit ties which exists betwe 
the Air Force Reserve and CAP. ' 

This year that realization came? 
nearly 1,700 cadets lifted to thl 
summer encampment by units of t ! 
Air Force Reserve. Ten of Air Foi 1 
Reserve's 15 troop carrier wings si 
ported the summer encampment. 



14 



"T7ie sky and its relation to Earth have always been the central interest of the Air Force. 
Ve have a manifold responsibility involving operations at any altitude where our security may 
te threatened. Hon. Eugene M. Zuckert Secretary of the Air Force 



am m 

Air 

Force Point 

0! View 



>PACE SUPREMACY. "Our first and continuing 
•jective is to develop peaceful uses of outer space," said 
ice President Lyndon B. Johnson recently at a meeting 
Dallas, Tex. "But," he added, "we are not unmindful 
the threats to peace on Earth which would result from 
e exclusive mastery of space by any power seeking to 
rpetuate earthly aggressions. 

"When we send our probes on missions into space, 
ar and far, we are not engaged in idle adventures. 
> some say, 'What man can conceive, man can do.' As 
st one example, it is conceivable that an unfriendly 
iwer might use space for arms storage, or for the sta- 
ining of an offensive weapon, or for other hostile 
irposes. If we are to be responsible and prudent, we 
ust anticipate today what the Soviets or others might 
ive or might develop to threaten our freedom. We 
nnot wishfully and unrealistically assume that no 
ition will extend its objectives of world domination 
■ means of space weapons. . . . 

"We go into space as pioneers came into this West, 
r one purpose only: to find for ourselves and our fami- 
s a better life on Earth and to assure the ultimate 
ccess of the cause of freedom we uphold. If we do not 
cceed in these efforts — as one great American put it — 
i will not be first on the Moon; we will not be first in 
ace; and one day soon we will not be first on Earth." 



^ 



it 



it 



it 



IR FORCE BUDGET. Secretary of the Air Force 

jgene M. Zuckert listed some of the many contributions 

national defense made by the Air Force at a recent 

eeting of the American Ordnance Association in Wash- 

gton, D. C. He said that: 

"With about 39 percent of the Department of De- 
nse budget, the Air Force not only provides our nation 
ith the Strategic Air Command and its more than 80 
:rcent of the Free World's strategic nuclear delivery 
pability, but it also provides some 70 percent of the 
:rsonnel for the North American Air Defense Com- 



mand, and the greatest portion of the facilities for de- 
fending our skies against attackers. 

"In addition, the Air Force provides: 

• The greatest portion by far of the nation's global 
military airlift and assault airlifts; 

• Air support for the Army; 

• The primary air arms for our Armed Forces in Europe, 
the Pacific, the Far East and Alaska; 

• The major operational and research, development 
and engineering programs in the Department of De- 
fense space effort; 

• The major Department of Defense support of the 
National Space Program; 

• Plus many other functions that contribute to our 
national strength." 

The Secretary listed other contributions of Air 
Force components, and added: "At the heart of this 
great national defense effort, of course, are the people 
who perform these military tasks. These Americans de- 
serve more than we are giving them. This, fortunately, is 
being recognized; I fervently hope that the military pay 
increase now moving through Congress will emerge in a 
form adequate to reduce our serious losses of valuable 
men who see greener pastures outside the Service." 



it 



it 



it 



-LiOW AND SLOW AIRCRAFT TACTICS called inef- 
fective. An Army Corps of Engineers expert in photo 
interpretation was quoted by a Washington, D. C. news- 
paper recently as telling the annual convention of the 
American Society of Photogrammetry and the American 
Congress on Surveying and Mapping that one of the 
roles of the photo interpreter is to help reduce the high 
number of enemy hits on aircraft by warning pilots of 
areas where they may face enemy fire. 

He said that guerrillas, especially when armed with 
automatic weapons, soon develop effective countermeas- 
ures against the slow-flying aircraft employed in anti- 
guerrilla warfare. He cited as typical a mission in which 
eight percent of helicopters employed were downed and 
nearly 50 percent were hit by enemy fire. 

The Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. David 
M. Shoup, commented on the same subject in testimony 
before the House Armed Services Committee. He said 
that "one of the most important features of an attack- 
type aircraft used for suppressing fire in the areas in 
which you intend to land helicopter troops is relative 
speed, for their own protection. And a helicopter just 
does not have it, it cannot get it — the relative speed." 

Experience both in Viet-Nam and in Korea has 
proved what can happen to "low and slow" aircraft in 
combat. The Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff for Pro- 
grams and Requirements, Gen. Gabriel Disosway, was 
asked several questions about this by the press on his 
return from an inspection trip to South Viet-Nam. The 
general spoke from experience in World War II, Korea 
and test exercises of tactical air forces during the past 
10 years. He told of the advantages of an aircraft that 
can fly both fast and slowly — that can hover and loiter 
if there is no enemy ground fire, but can rush in and out 
with its strafing and bomb load if opposed by air defenses. 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR K 
POSTAGE AND FEE'. F-Alt 



USAf Recurring Pub 

No. 30-H-7-63-3I4. 471 



\ "• rr T"^S AIR F0R^_ % 





GAMER 

(1) The AFRes 442nd TCWg., Richards-Gebaur AFB, Mo., and its five 
C-J24 groups were transferred from TAC to MATS for training, July 1. 
MATS Commander, Gen. Joe Kelly, greets crewman of 936th TCGp., 
at a ceremony hosted by 442nd Commander, Brig. Gen. James McPart- 
lin. CON AC will continue to supply logistic support 
for the units. (2) Top recruiters from ANG's 140th 
TFWg., Denver, Colo., got $50 each from nonappro- 
priated funds and also spent three days at a luxury 
hotel in Puerto Rico as a reward for "Try One" cam- 
paign efforts, (l-r) SSgts. W. Collier, A. Sanchez, P. 
Smith, and A1C T. Urioste. (3) During a recent visit 
to the Air Reserve Records Center, Denver, Colo., Mr. 
Benjamin Fridge, USAF Special Assistant for Man- 
power, Personnel and Reserve Forces, learns operation 
of high-speed electronic printer from Mr. L. Thorsheim, 
as Center Commander, Col. Carroll Geddes (r) and Col. 
L. Reed, look on. At left is Mr. R. Lehrer, console 
operator. (4) Olympic track and field stars Rafer John- 
son (r) and Max Truex reminisced recently at Oxnard 
AFB, Calif., where A2C Johnson took summer train- 
ing with the 9614th AFRes Recovery Sq., and 1st Lt. 
Truex is on active duty with the Air Defense Command. 




V 



1913 



1963 




anniversary of the 
silver wings 
. . .in retrospect. 



Reserve outlook: 
the next five years 



u 



OCTOBER 1963 




the air reservist 



OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE AIR RESERVE FORCES 



SILVER 




WINGS 




the air reservist 

Vol. XV— No. 8 Oct. 1963 

AIR NATIONAL GUARD 
AIR FORCE RESERVE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 

EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 

The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of Hq USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, D.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq USAF. 





'.513 1963 


trui ait re^LiiiSt 










l m a*> '"' >\ 


iimhS 


WW>H IP 


r 


1 



COVER: Oct. 6, is the golden anni- 
versary of the Air Force's "Silver 
Wings." The first Military Aviator 
badges were awarded on that date 
in 1913, to Capt. Charles Chandler 
shown at controls of an early training 
plane and to 2nd Lt. Thomas Milling. 
This issue is dedicated to those early 
airmen and also to the future role of 
today's Air Reserve Forces. 



Reserve 

Outlook 



Recent achievements of 

the Reserve Forces 

has resulted in 

"First Team' acceptance, 

and — ironically, 

problems... 



THE AIR FORCE ASSOCIATION'S 
17th national convention and 
Aerospace Panorama drew a 
large delegation of Reservists to the 
Nation's capital September 11-13. 
From a Reservist's viewpoint, the 
highlight of the convention was the 
Reserve Forces Seminar which fea- 
tured discussions of Air Reserve 
Forces programs by commanders of 
Air Force's major air commands. The 
theme of the seminar was the "Next 
Five Years." The speakers were Gen. 
Walter C. Sweeney, Jr., commander, 
Tactical Air Command; Gen. Joe W. 
Kelly, commander, Military Air 
Transport Service; Lt. Gen. Herbert 
B. Thatcher, commander, Air Defense 
Command; Lt. Gen. Edward J. Tim- 
berlake, commander, Continental Air 
Command, and Maj. Gen. Kenneth P. 
Bergquist, commander, Air Force 
Communications Service. 

A panel consisting of Mr. John A. 
Lang, Jr., deputy for Reserve and 
ROTC Affairs, Maj. Gen. Curtis R. 
Low, asst. chief of staff for Reserve 
Forces, and Brig. Gen. I. G. Brown, 
asst. chief of the National Guard Bu- 
reau for Air National Guard, assisted 
the speakers in answering questions 
from the floor following each speech. 

Key points expressed by the speak- 
ers who represented the "gaining" 
commands for Reservists included 
need and utility of the Air Reserve 
Forces, their problem areas and plans 
for the future. 

A breakdown of these key points 
from the viewpoints of the "gaining" 
commands follows: 

Need for Reserve Forces 

TAC: "As important as the Berlin 
and Cuban Reserve call-ups were in 
terms of national security and world 
peace in those specific instances, they 
had deeper meaning when viewed in 
context with the long-range Reserve 
operations. In short, we must have 
Reserve forces which are ready now, 
for immediate use to meet a wide 
range of contingencies. 



"To emphasize this point, let r ( 
say that in TAC we regard our 
signed Air National Guard and / 
Force Reserve units as an integi 
part of the regular force. If there 
any thought of them as a 'seco 
team,' it means that someone I 
missed the point." 
MATS: "Working on a D-Day evei 
day basis, we stand ready for co 
tingencies anywhere, anytime." 

"Now, it is obvious that since t 
dictates of budget and national eq 
nomy limit the magnitude of the 
tive military force, such a force mv 
be backed up by a highly compete 
Reserve." 
ADC: ". . . the Air Defense Cot 
mand has only one team. Active du 
units, Air Guardsmen and individi 
Reservists jointly form one first-stri 
aerospace defense force — a significa 
and potent part of this nation's dett 
rent and counterforce capability. 

"We expect and need the Reser 
Forces to continue to play a maj 
role in the Air Defense Commanc 
AFCS: "I feel that this is an u 
equaled opportunity to state, unequi 
ocably, to this important group, tr. 
we in the Air Force Communicatio 
Service NEED the augmentation for 
of our Air National Guard and / 
Force Reserve components." 

Utilization of Reserve Forces] 

MATS: "In simplest language, tl 
mission of Reserve Forces, assign 
to the Military Air Transport Servic 
is to provide added global airl 
capability needed by the Departme 
of Defense to plan its strategy wi 
maximum flexibility. We have ma 
use of that flexibility during the pi 
year. We used volunteer Air Gua 
transport crews during the Cub 
crisis on MA 1 S-directed missions 
Europe and South America, af 
every week during the year on spec, 
assignment and goodwill missio 
around the globe." 
TAC: "We also are quite pleas, 
with the steady progress we ha| 



le in drawing TAC's regular and 
lerve Forces closer together in 
lion requirements, combat readi- 
ft, mobility and overall profession- 
Iri. In TAC, this is serious busi- 
I, when you realize that when our 
Kned Reserve Forces are mobilized 
C's total resources more than 
able. We must depend more and 
re upon Reserve Forces to share 
( day-to-day obligations." 
irS: "I feel that our Air National 
Ird and Air Force Reserve units 
b a mission that does not dupli- 
|, but, instead, complements the 
ptions we are charged with per- 
jning as a major air command. We 

these Reserve Forces." 
C: "In ADC, we propose to main- 

this capability by using our Re- 
e Forces in three major areas: 

Our individual Reserve augmen- 
Dn program of mobilization as- 
ees; (2) the Air National Guard 
;s; and (3) the Air Force Reserve 
overy units in the wartime dis- 
;al, aircraft recovery and recon- 
ltion program, where we have a 
ning responsibility. These three 
ibined give us maximum wartime 
ability with a minimum of active 
i personnel." 

The Problem Areas 

C: "We are genuinely concerned 
r the capability of our Reservists 
?e notified and to appear on the 
le within the time that may be 
liable." 

CS: ". . . Air National Guard and 
Force Reserve organizations pos- 
unusual professional abilities. 
y possess splendid educational 
lifications. And, they have high 
ale. . . . However, in spite of the 
lities our Reserve Forces person- 
possess we find that in the overall 
erve program there are shortcom- 
; in two main areas: ( 1 ) inflexible 
anization, and (2) the lack of 
to-date equipment to attain the 
i degree of M-Day readiness we 
is necessary." 

TS: ". . . MATS' Reserve Forces 
ently have an overall manning 
ition of 66 percent, but we do not 
ik this is anywhere near good 
ugh. We must achieve a rate much 
re in line with the active Air 
ce standard." 

C: "Basically, our objective is to 
stically support the Reserve Forces 
he same manner, degree and in- 
>ity that we support the regular 
:es. But present funding and ma- 
al programming is not adequate 
<eep pace with needs. We cannot 
vide enough first-line aircraft and 



Air National Guard 




Air Force Reserve 




Outstanding Units 



(Top) As commander of ANG's 
outstanding unit, the 135th 
Air Commando Gp., Baltimore, 
Md., Lt. Col. Richard Lynch 
accepts trophy from Brig. Gen. 
Robert Campbell during AFA 
convention in Wash., D.C. 
(Bottom) Air Force Reserve's 
outstanding unit award went 
to Brig. Gen. Joseph Lingle, 
commander, 440th TCWg., 
Milwaukee, Wise. Maj. Gen. 
Jess Larson (r) chairman of 
AFA's Air Reserve Council 
made the presentation. 



support equipment. There is not 
enough money for additional drill 
pay periods for individual training." 
CON AC: "It was almost a year ago, 
in Las Vegas, that I first discussed 
before a Reserve Forces Seminar the 
major problems of the Air Reserve 
Forces as I saw them. My emphasis 
then, as it has been many times since, 
was on the urgent need for more 
realistic programming and better all- 
around manning." 

The Next Five Years 

ADC: "My staff will continue to place 
emphasis on the concepts . . . namely, 
that ADC believes firmly in a 'One 
Team' approach; that our Reserves 
must maintain a 'Ready Now' posture; 
and that our augmentation space, our 
UMD, reflect a true 'Need to Have' 
requirement. 

"To these ends, we will continually 
study our mission in terms of the 
responsibilities of the regular forces, 
the individual Reservists, the Air 
National Guard units, and the Re- 
serve Recovery units." 
AFCS: ". . . we in AFCS are seek- 
ing an expanded concept; we have 
proposed that the estimated 14,000 
communications operations and main- 
tenance personnel integral to flying 
units and Reserve Recovery squad- 
rons be shelled out and added to the 
present AFCS assets; that the re- 
sultant forces be reorganized into 
functional units — some as small as 
flights — and that these be manned 
and be given modern equipment, so 
that AFCS can employ these units 
selectively when and wherever 
needed." 

TAC: "In the next few years, our 
Air National Guard forces will be 
completely equipped with Century 
series tactical fighters and reconnais- 
sance aircraft. Our Air Force Reserve 
troop carrier units are even now in 
the process of converting from the 
overage C-119 to the C-124 which 
will greatly enhance their combat 
readiness capabilities. 

". . . support equipment will be up- 
graded and modernized to give the 
Reserves an across-the-board effec- 
tiveness comparable with TAC's regu- 
lar forces. This applies equally to the 
field of unconventional warfare which 
is a relatively new responsibility for 
the Air National Guard. 

"One new approach to more realis- 
tic training is a plan that envisions 
the use of individual Reservists in 
support functions in U. S. Strike Com- 
mand exercises. This proposal con- 
templates that eventually 50 percent 

see OUTLOOK page 4 




continued from page 3 

of the personnel assigned to the sup- 
port area in future joint exercises will 
be Reservists. 

"If we expect to meet cockpit re- 
quirements programmed for the 1970 
time period, action must be taken now 
to initiate a pilot training program of 
sufficient magnitude to insure an ade- 
quate supply of qualified aircrew per- 
sonnel. 

"In substance, we have one single 
goal: enhance the professional quality 
of our Reserve forces to meet our 
rapidly increasing obligations." 
MATS: "... what is the picture for 
MATS' Reserve Forces in the next 
five years? 

"Seven of our nine ANG aero- 
medical transport squadrons will be 
completely equipped with a total of 
55 of the reliable four-engine Lock- 
heed C-I2I Constellations. 

"Sixteen of our Air National Guard 
heavy transport squadrons and two of 
our ANG aeromedical transport 
squadrons have received C-97's. 



"With the input of additional Lock- 
heed C-130E Hercules and the new 
Lockheed C-141 StarUfter , which just 
rolled out of the factory last month, 
Douglas C-124 Globemasters will be 
assigned to the Reserve Forces. 

"Our Reserve Forces will be raised 
from the present 44,000 to around 
58,000 as additional medium troop 
carrier units are transferred to MATS. 

"The total of Reserve Forces air- 
craft assigned to MATS will be in 
the order of 500 four-engine aircraft, 
the majority of which will have out- 
size cargo capability. 

"MATS Air Force Reserve units 
will continue to receive an even larger 
number of training missions than ever 
before." 

CONAC: ". . . the new responsibili- 
ites of the Air Force Reserve — and 
the ever-shortening reaction time re- 
quired — and the fact that different 
types of Reserve units and individuals 
do exist and can all be utilized by 
the Air Force — indicates to me that 
some realignment of the CONAC and 



Reserve structure is needed. The e 
criteria should be better control, b 
ter communication, better manni 
and management, better utili/atior 

Reservists Receive Awards 

Air Force Reservists and Air r* 
tional Guardsmen received th 
share of honors during the Al 
convention. These included: 

Outstanding Airmen Awards 
presented to SMSgt. Lawrence 
McCarthy, 115th Fighter Gp., Ma 
son, Wise, ANG, and SSgt. Kt 
neth N. Bracken, 9204th Rese: 
Recovery Sq., Johnstown, Pa. 

Winston P. Wilson Trophy — 
ANG's outstanding unit, the 13. 
Air Commando Gp., Martin Airpc 
Baltimore, Md. 

Outstanding Air Force Rese: 
Award — To the 440th Troop C 
rier Wing, Gen. Mitchell Field, N 
waukee, Wise. 

Grover Loening Trophy — F 
sented for the first time this year 
CONAC's troop carrier competit 
winner, the 452nd TCWg., Ma 
AFB, Calif., which took top hon 
for the third consecutive year. 

Earl T. Ricks Memorial Tropin 
Presented to 152nd Tactical Rec 
naissance Gp., Reno, Nevada Ar- 
winners of the annual ANG rr 
conducted this year at Shaw AFB 

AFA Reserve Troop Car 
Trophy — To 433rd Troop Can 
Wg., crew which took top individ 
honors in the seventh annual CON 
troop carrier competition staged 
year at Clinton County AFB, V 
mington, Ohio, Sept. 8-11. 

During the convention AFA d 
gates elected Dr. W. Randolph Lc 
lace II, an Air Force Reserve br| 
dier general and Albuquerque, N. 
physician as its new president 
the coming year. 

Delegates also voted to hold tl 
1964 convention in Wash, D. C. 

Scanning^)) 

Air Force Regulation 30-30 ^ 
revised recently to implemer 

DOD directive concerning standi 
of conduct (conflict of interest) 
pected of all categories of person 
including Reservists. The revision 
corporates changes enacted in the 
session of Congress and reflects j 
cies prescribed by the President. 
Spelled out are detailed insti 
tions applying to active duty pen 
nel, full-time civilian employ 

see SCANNING pa 



SILVER WINGS 

1913-1963 




$n /tetoospect 



General Orders, 
No. 39. 




WAR DEPARTMENT, 
Washington, May 27, 1913. 



Officers of the Army qualifying as military avia- 
tors under the rules approved by the Secretary of 
War will receive a military aviator's certificate con- 
forming to the approved design in the office of the 
Chief Signal Officer. 

BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARY OF WAR: 
LEONARD WOOD 
Major General, Chief of Staff. 




ctober 6, marks the U.S. Air 
:e's fiftieth "Silver Wings" anni- 
ary. On that day in 1913 two 
eer military aviators gained the 
nction of being the first to wear 
"Military Aviator" badge. The 
lg airmen were Capt. Charles 
. Chandler and 2nd Lt. Thomas 
billing. 

[ore than a year earlier (July 5, 
I) they, and a young infantry 
er, 1st Lt. Henry H. Arnold, had 
e another contribution to military 
tion history by being the first to 
ify as military pilots under the 
;irements of War Department 
eral Order No. 39. Eventually a 
. of 24 Army officers received 
lar recognition before General 
sr No. 39 was rescinded on Janu- 
1, 1914. The list includes such 
es as Fulois, Ellington, Kelly, 
m, and Kirtland; and it serves as 



Some of the first military aviators to wear "Silver Wings" were 
Army officers (l-r) Beck, Arnold, Chandler, Milling and Kirtland. 



a symbol of the beginning of a new 
era of military strategy. 

"Silver Wings" is a just commemo- 
ration of the accomplishments of these 
early military fliers, but it does not 
stop there. It is as much a tribute to 
Cpl. Vernon L. Burge (the first en- 
listed man to learn to fly — 1912) as it 
is to Gen. "Billy" Mitchell. It pays 
homage to every member of the Army 
Air Force, the U.S. Air Force, the Air 
National Guard and the Air Force 
Reserve, who has ever worn a pair of 
"Silver Wings." 

The early history of today's Citi- 
zen/Airmen is spiced with such names 
as Boiling, Haven and Winder. Capt. 
Raynal C. Boiling was instrumental 
in establishing the first aviation unit 
of the National Guard. This unit, the 
1st Aero Company of the New York 
National Guard was the first such unit 
taken into Federal Service. 





Pfc. Beckwith Haven of the New 
York National Guard is recognized 
as the first Guardsman to qualify as 
a military aviator (FAI, airplane pilot 
certificate #127—1912), and Lt. Col. 
Charles B. Winder followed shortly 
thereafter with certificate #130. 

In this tribute to all "Wings" wear- 
ers, it is fitting that the sentiments of 
the late General of the Army Henry 
H. Arnold (the young infantry lieu- 
tenant of 1912) be printed: 

"Every man who wears silver 
wings knows what they are — in a 
sense, the Air Force itself — the men, 
the deeds, the gallantry, the danger, 
the undying spirit. 

"Silver wings are the badge of com- 
bat and devotion to duty. They repre- 
sent the pilots, the bombardiers, the 
navigators, the gunners, the mechan- 
ics, the officers, the enlisted men. 

"They stand for victory — a victory 
achieved despite seemingly insur- 
mountable obstacles. Silver wings are 
a symbol of America, our country, 
our flag, the love that all of us feel 
for our free and proud homeland." 

General Arnold died in 1950, and 
shortly thereafter a new group of pio- 
neers carried on the spirit of the mili- 
tary aviators of half a century ago. 
They are the astronauts of today, the 
Gordon Coopers, Bob Whites, Gus 
Grissoms and Bob Rushworths. They 
are putting into practice the rocket 
experiments of Dr. Robert H. God- 
dard, who in 1926 wielded the blow- 
torch that ignited the world's first 
liquid-propellant rocket flight. 

These new pioneers of space wear 
the "Silver Wings" of the astronaut, 
and they, like Chandler and Milling, 
represent the beginning of a new era 
of military technology. What the next 
50 years may hold in store is un- 
known, except that the centennial an- 
niversary will also be celebrated by 
men wearing "Silver Wings." 



■ SCANNING from page 4 

special (part-time) employees, regu- 
lar retired officers, former officers or 
employees and officers of the Reserve. 

All Reservists are enjoined to fa- 
miliarize themselves with provisions 
of the regulation which apply to them. 
In a general section dealing with 
ethics, the directive states, "Air Force 
personnel are bound to refrain from 
any private business or professional 
activity which would place them in 
a position where there is a conflict 
between their private interests and the 
public interest of the United States. 
Even though a technical conflict . . . 
may not exist, Air Force personnel 
must avoid the appearance of such a 
conflict from a public confidence 
point of view." 

Reservists should consult the near- 
est Air Force legal officer for advice 
and assistance in answering questions 
concerning the interpretation and ap- 
plicability of this regulation. 

Recent changes to AFM 35-1, 
Military Classification Policy 

Manual pertaining to Air Force Re- 
serve officers not on active military 
duty, requires the addition of the 
fourth (proficiency level) digit. 

The Air Reserve Records Center, 
Denver, is responsible for the classi- 
fication of all officers assigned to 
the Nonaffiliated Reserve Section 
(NARS), Ineligible Reserve Section 
(IRS), Inactive Status List Reserve 
Section (ISLRS), Retired Reserve 
Section and those selectively assigned 
to Reserve units. During the month of 
October, ARRC will award fourth 
digits to AFSCs of officers in the 
above assignments. The award in this 
instance, however, is restricted to the 
entry level, since ARRC will not be 
authorized to award fully qualified 
AFSCs (except in specialties where 
there is no entry level). This restric- 
tion also applies to Part III Reservists. 

All other Air Force Reserve officers 
will be awarded the fourth digit by 
unit personnel officers who will be 
responsible for review of individual 
qualifications and award at the entry 
or fully qualified level, as appropriate. 

In the future, all assignment orders 
from ARRC will carry the entry level 
AFSC. To avoid individual queries to 
ARRC, units should be certain that 
newly assigned personnel understand 
that this procedure is not intended to 
downgrade qualifications, but rather 
to maintain a system of across the 
board accounting of Reserve re- 
sources. Fully qualified personnel 
should be upgraded by units immedi- 
ately after assignment. 



New N.G.B. Chief 




Live Recovery 




Current Events 

(Top) Maj. Gen. Winston P. 
Wilson (I) is sworn in as Chief, 
National Guard Bureau by Air 
Force Secretary, Eugene M. 
Zuckert at Pentagon cere- 
mony, Sept. 4. Gen. Wilson 
will direct the activities of 
470,000 Army and Air Na- 
tional Guardsmen. (Bottom) 
MSgt Doug Miller (I) and A1C 
Harry Van Dyke of the 9209th 
Recovery Sq., Roanoke, Va., 
complete repairs to C-l 19, the 
14th actual emergency recov- 
ery in two years for the unit. 



The Reserve Officers Associi 
tion's Air Force Affairs Coil 

mittee will hold its fall meeting! 
Richards-Gebaur AFB, Kansas (M 
Mo., Nov. 2. 

Among those addressing the coi 
mitteemen will be Col. Charles! 
Bock, executive secretary of the J 
Reserve Forces Policy Committi 
Hq USAF, who will brief them U 
the policy making procedures of I 
committee and of Reserve poll 
councils of major commands. 

Representatives from the Directi 
of Personnel Planning, Hq USA 
will discuss the new active duty o! 
cers Reserve career program, whi 
replaces the old 20-10 program, a 
also the results of a command revii 
on necessary legislative amendmei 
to ROPA. 

Other subjects to be discussed w 
be future roles of the Air Resei 
Forces, Continental Air Commarn 
beefed-up Reserve recruiting pii 
gram, and recent legislative tree 
concerning the Air Reserve Forces. 

Another International Air C 
det Exchange Program co 

eluded last August as 130 young 
cadets from 20 countries of Euro] 
the Near East, Central and Sov 
America, Canada and Great Brit; 
capped a 19-day visit to the Unit 
States with a four-day tour of the i 
tion's capital. 

This was the 16th annual I 
change, and as they have in so ma 
of the past Exchanges, Air Foi 
Reserve Officers were in the fo" 
front of prominent Washingtoniz 
who helped make the visitor's Was 
ington stay memorable. 

One of the most impressive i 
pacts made upon the visiting cad 
was the personal greeting they 
ceived from a number of Unit 
States Senators when the group v 
ited the Capitol building. 

Among the first to take time ( 
from his busy schedule to meet 1 
cadets was Sen. Howard W. Cann 
of Nevada. The Senator, who is a 
a brigadier general in the Air Fo; 
Reserve, chatted for some time w 
the cadets from Chile. The Chile; 
were guests of the Nevada CAP w 
during their stay in the U. S. 

Other Senators who person* 
greeted the cadets on the east st« 
of the Capitol included Senate Min 
ity Leader Everett M. Dirksen of' 
linois. The Switzerland cadets visi 
his home state. 

Senator Frank Church of Ids' 
sought out the English cadets, w 



were guests of the Idaho CAP wing, 
while Sen. A. Willis Robertson of 
Virginia talked with the Belgian ca- 
dets on their impressions of his state. 
Two other Senators, Hiram Fong 
of Hawaii, and Vance Hartke of In- 
diana, were principal speakers at a 
dinner given in honor of the cadets. 

Two newly organized Air Force 
Reserve Air Postal groups were 

activated in September. They were 
the 1st Air Postal Gp., Dobbins AFB, 
Ga., and the 2nd Air Postal Gp., Ft. 
Miley, San Francisco, Calif. 

Designated as Category "A" units, 
each of the new groups is authorized 
nine officers and nineteen airmen. 
Also scheduled for activation at lo- 
cations to be determined in the near 
future are eight Reserve Air Postal 
flights, four under each group. Each 
of these flights will be authorized two 
officers and nineteen airmen. 

The groups, which are expected 
to attain operational capability by 
July 1, 1964, are patterned after the 
active duty groups in Europe and the 
Pacific. They will provide complete 
postal and security courier service 
within a given area of responsiblity, 
and immediate assistance and aug- 
mentation of the world-wide military 
postal and security courier network. 

The units will be assigned to 
CONAC for command, training, per- 
sonnel administration, logistics sup- 
port, and inspection during peacetime. 
They will be deployed in the event of 
mobilization as directed by the Postal 
and Security Courier Operations Di- 
vision of Hq USAF. 

BRIEFLY... 

Reserve aeromedical evacuation 
crews from the 36th and 46th Aero- 
medical Evacuation Squadrons on ac- 
tive duty with MATS for their two 
week summer training, flew into Mid- 
way Airport, Chicago, 111., during 
August, to demonstrate a tactical 
aeromedical mission to the National 
Association of Flying Physicians. Ap- 
proximately 120 persons witnessed 
the exercise. Simulated wounds were 
made up by cosmetologists at Scott 
AFB's USAF Hospital. A training 
moulage set was also used for the 10 
individuals acting as patients. These 
simulated wounds were bandaged and 
the patients given first aid and pre- 
pared for air evacuation during the 
demonstration. Reservists were trans- 
ported from Scott AFB to Chicago 
and return by a C-119 of the 357th 
TCSq., Bates Field, Mobile, Ala. 



One hundred three Air Force Re- 
serve airmen recently received direct 
commissions under Continental Air 
Command's "Outstanding Reserve 
Airman Appointment" program for 
fiscal year 1963. The new officers are 
assigned to Air Force Reserve units 
throughout the country. Eighteen were 
appointed as captains, 57 as first lieu- 
tenants, and 28 as second lieutenants. 
Under a recent policy change the cap- 
tains will receive seven years credit 
and the first lieutenants three years 
credit toward promotion considera- 
tion. The new officers will remain on 
a non-active duty status, although they 
will be eligible to compete for call-up 
to active duty service. 



An unusual contribution was re- 
cently made to the Falcon Founda- 
tion fund by Lt. Col. Jacqueline Coch- 
ran, an Air Force Reservist and 
world-famed aviatrix. Colonel Coch- 
ran donated all her Reserve pay and 
allowances for the next two years — 
totaling $643 — to the fund. 



time taking part in Operation Swift 
Strike III. The 914th information offi- 
cer contacted families of airmen in 
the flooded area offering aid. Eleven 
airmen armed with brooms, mops, 
shovels and other cleaning gear, spent 
some 12 hours helping to restore the 
Miller home and that of another air- 
man, to a liveable condition. 

BOARDS... 

A board will convene at the Air 
Reserve Records Center Dec. 2-13, 
to consider the records of approxi- 
mately 5,000 Reserve captains for 
promotion to the grade of major. To 
be eligible for consideration, officers 
must hold a promotion service date 
on or before Mar. 31, 1958, have a 
total years service date on or before 
Mar. 31, 1951, and must have been 
in an active status for one year prior 
to Board's convening. 



Aid to a Reservist's family whose 
home was damaged during a storm 
which inundated Buffalo, N.Y., last 
August, was rendered by fellow-mem- 
bers of the 914th Troop Carrier Gp., 
of Niagara Falls. The family of SSgt. 
Edward H. Miller, was one of hun- 
dreds forced to leave their homes after 
health inspections showed them un- 
safe following the storm. Sergeant 
Miller, an aircraft mechanic with the 
914th, was in South Carolina at the 



Officers in the permanent Re- 
serve grades of colonel and lieuten- 
ant colonel who are interested in 
serving on officer promotion selection 
boards at the Air Reserve Records 
Center in Denver, Colo., are urged to 
submit AF Forms 1289 (application 
for Active Duty Training), to ARRC 
through their units. Boards are slated 
to meet Dec. 2-13, 1963; Mar. 2-13, 
and May 4-15, 1964. Representation 
on boards must include a percentage 
of rated versus non-rated, Category 
A, Category B, Part I and Part II 
personnel, and must cover generally 
all parts of the U.S. 




During a Kansas City, Mo., observance of USAF's 16th Anniversary, Sen. 
Stuart Symington (r) gave plaque to 442nd TCWg., Commander, Brig. Gen. 
James McPartlin (c) for unit's 20-year service. Also attending were (I) 
Gen. Carl Spaatz, USAF (Ret.) and Air Force Secretary, Eugene Zuckert. 




Air National Guard jets, tankers, flight 
crews and ground personnel formed 
One Team to support the 3500 mile, non- 
stop flight of 12 "recce jets" 
from Birmingham to Anchorage to 
accomplish a reconnaissance mission 
for the Alaskan Air Command... 




Project commander, Brig. Gen. Doster (standing) checks progress with Maj. D. Laird in C-135 "flyii 
During the all-Air Guard ". . . history making" deployment to Alaska, an RF-84F is refueled in fli 



A, 



IR GUARDSMEN from seven 
states joined together in a close- 
working team recently to successfully 
complete the longest non-stop de- 
ployment of Air National Guard 
jets ever attempted. 

On August 30, 12 RF-84Fs of 
the 117th Tactical Reconnaissance 
Wing, which has units in Alabama, 
Arkansas and Mississippi, left wing 
headquarters in Birmingham for the 
3,500-mile flight to Alaska. 

Project Minuteman Alpha, com- 
manded by Alabama Air Guard 
Brig. Gen. G. Reid Doster, Jr., was 
successful not only in its deployment 
mission but also in obtaining much 
needed reconnaissance photographs 
for the Alaskan Command. Guards- 




I post." (Top) 

C-97 tanker. (Bottom) 



men flew more than 300 hours and 
photographed some 250 targets in the 
vast regions of Alaska, some so far 
from civilization — let alone an ade- 
quate landing strip — that a KC-97 
tanker had to refuel the jets. 

The 12 photo recon jets were met 
three times along the way from 
Birmingham to Alaska and three 
times on the way back by ANG re- 
fueling tankers. Their first refueling 
came from the Illinois Air Guard's 
126th Air Refueling Group from 
Chicago, the second from the Ohio 
Air Guard's 160th Air Refueling 
Group at Clinton County Airport and 
the third, which occurred over Cana- 
da, from the Wisconsin Air Guard's 
128th Air Refueling Group at Mil- 
waukee. These last aircraft stayed 
with the 117th's aircraft during their 
four days in Alaska to provide re- 
fueling for them on their photo- 
graphic missions. Aircraft of the 
133rd Air Transport Sq., New Hamp- 
shire ANG, also provided support 
during the Alaskan mission. 

The 1 1 7th was also one of the 
ANG units called to active duty 
during the Berlin mobilization two 
years ago. General Doster noted with 
pride that the wing was then the 
first ever to deploy RF-84Fs across 
the Atlantic during Operation Stair 
Step. But then it had taken the 
Guardsmen five days, with lots of 
help from the active Air Force, to 
island-hop their way to their assigned 
station in France. Operation Stair 
Step has been hailed as the most 
successful deployment of all time. 
Yet just two years later, General 
Doster continued, with air refueling 
added to the Guard's capability, this 
non-stop deployment which more 
than equalled the distance to Europe, 
was completed, with all Air Guard 
support, in about eight hours. 

The Guardsmen had little time to 
congratulate themselves on the suc- 
cess of their venture when they ar- 
rived in Anchorage, for they had to 
begin immediately to make plans for 
the long Labor Day weekend. On 
Saturday, Sunday and Labor Day 
their schedule included a 4:30 a.m. 
reveille, a quick breakfast, a briefing 
on their targets for the day and a 
long, hard day over frozen Alaska. 

By September 3, they had com- 
pleted 53 out of the 54 sorties as- 
signed to them. The one they were 
unable to photograph was over the 
Point Barrow area where a 200-foot 
ceiling prevented the pilots from mak- 
ing their runs. Other than this the 
weather had been extraordinarily 
good for the recon men. Even native 



Alaskans, who said this had been an 
exceptionally poor summer in Alaska, 
commented on the weather during the 
period the "Southerners" were visit- 
ing them. On September 4, the sup- 
port aircraft from New Hampshire 
were readied for the flight home. 

To add to the important stock of 
pictures for our defense planners, the 
men of the 1 17th had 3,458 exposures 
on 2,400 feet of film, much of it cov- 
ering areas that had never before been 
photographed from the air. 

Most important, as the 12 jet 
aircraft swooped back over Canada 
and the United States, picking up 
their refueling points without a hitch, 
these Air Guardsmen could take satis- 
faction in the fact that they had once 
again proved their readiness and the 
ANG's ability to go anywhere, any- 
time to defend its country. 

Maj. Gen. Winston P. Wilson, 
keeping close watch on Minuteman 
Alpha's activities from his desk in the 
Pentagon, talked to the Guardsmen 
over Canada. He congratulated Gen- 
eral Doster in the TAC C-135 flying 
command post that accompanied the 
men of the 117th and then asked to 
be transferred to flight leader Maj. 
Sam Wilcox. Gen. Wilson gave Major 
Wilcox an enthusiastic well-done. 

The RF-84Fs' in-commission rate 
while in the entirely new environment 
of Canada was 98.3 and when the 
forms were checked back in Birming- 
ham not a single aircraft had a write- 
up for a mechanical defect. "We could 
have turned around and flown right 
back," General Doster said. 

Praise and congratulations poured 
in from all over, letting General 
Doster and his men know that the 
importance of their accomplishment 
was appreciated. General Wilson put 
his down in a letter to General Doster 
and Brig. Gen. I. G. Brown, assistant 
chief of the National Guard Bureau 
for the Air National Guard, offered 
his "enthusiastic congratulations." 

But the highest praise of all came 
from Gen. Curtis E. LeMay, Air 
Force chief of staff, who said in a 
letter to General Doster, "The his- 
tory-making deployment to Alaska in 
which Air National Guard tankers, 
transports and reconnaissance aircraft 
from seven states were welded into 
one team to perform a much needed 
peacetime mission for the Alaskan 
Command certainly reflects credit 
upon you, the units which took part, 
and the Air National Guard. The de- 
tailed planning, professional airman- 
ship and outstanding maintenance 
during this operation established a 
record for which we are all proud." 



ted 



ALABAMA 
908 TCGp., Bates Field (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: open- 
ings in AFSC 271X0, 702X0 and 
75170. 

CALIFORNIA 

938 TCGp., Hamilton AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 571X0, 291X0 and 582X0. 

940 TCGp., McClellan AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: open- 
ings in AFSC 204X0, 241 X0A and 
291X0. 

942 TCGp., March AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 571X0, 565X0 and 
43151A. 

943 TCGp., March AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 571X0, 291X0 and 
43171A. 

944 TCGp., March AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (6-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 643X0A. 571X0 and 
241X0A. 

CONNECTICUT 
90S TCGp., Bradley Field (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 43171A, 43151A and 
62250. 

FLORIDA 

915 TCGp., Homestead AFB (AFRes) 

Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 

1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 

in AFSC 565X0, 571X0 and 622X0. 

GEORGIA 

918 TCGp., Dobbins AFB (AFRes) 

Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 

1055A and 1535. Enlisted: openings 

in AFSC 27430, 324X0 and 42450. 



928 TCGp., 

Officer: (O 
1055Z and 
in AFSC 
571X0. 
932 TCGp., 
Officer: (O 
1055Z and 
in AFSC 
643X0A. 



ILLINOIS 

OHare AP (AFRes) 

•2/3) openings in AFSC 

1535. Enlisted: openings 

431X1A, 607X0 and 

Scott AFB (AFRES) 
■2/3) openings in AFSC 
1535. Enlisted: openings 

431X1A, 702X0 and 



930 TCGp., 

Officer: (O 
1055Z and 
in AFSC 
271X0. 

931 TCGp., 
Officer: (O 
1055Z and 
in AFSC 
271X0. 



INDIANA 

Bakalar AFB (AFRes) 

■2/3) openings in AFSC 

1535. Enlisted: openings 

431X1A, 571X0 and 

Bakalar AFB (AFRes) 

■2/3) openings in AFSC 

1535. Enlisted: openings 

431X1A, 571X0 and 



LOUISIANA 

917 TCGp., Barksdale AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
I055C and 153*. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 43570. 702X0 and 
643X0A. 

926 TCGp., NAS New Orleans 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 10557. and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 29352. 274X0 
and 242X0. 

MARYLAND 
909 TCGp., Andrews AFB (AFRes) 

I ifj-2'3) openings in AFSC 
/ ..ml 1515 Enlisted: openings 
in AfSf 274X0. 43IX1A and 
641X0A 



MASSACHUSETTS 

901 TCGp., L. G. Hanscom Field 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 43 151 A, 70250 
and 57150. 

MICHIGAN 
927 TCGp., Selfridge AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 431X1A, 571X0 and 
607X0. 

MINNESOTA 

934 TCGp., Mpls.-St. Paul IAP 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 242X0, 274X0 
and 704X0. 

MISSOURI 

935 TCGp., Richards-Gebaur AFB 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055C and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 43570, 643X0A 
and 60750. 

963 TCGp., Richards-Gebaur AFB 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055C and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 43570, 643X0A 
and 60750. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

902 TCGp., Grenier Field (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 43151A, 70250 and 27150. 

NEW JERSEY 

903 TCGp., McGuire AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 43171A, 43151A and 
62250. 

NEW YORK 

904 TCGp., Stewart AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 43171A, 43151A and 
62250. 

914 TCGp., Niagara Falls MAP 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 271X0, 431X1A 
and 571X0. 

OHIO 

906 TCGp., Clinton County AFB 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 431X1A, 27430 
and 57150. 

907 TCGp., Clinton County AFB 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 57IXO, 291X0 
and 431X1A. 

910 TCGp., Youngstown MAP 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 274X0, 431X1A 
and 643X0A. 

OKLAHOMA 

929 TCGp., Davis Field (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
I055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 43IX1A, 571X0 and 
A607X0. 

937 TCGp., Tinker AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: IO-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055C and 1515. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 43570. 291X0 and 571X0. 

OREGON 
9.19 TCGp., Portland IAP (AFRes) 

Offi -i (0-2 ii opening! in AFSC 

1055/. and 1515 I nlistcd openings 
in AFSC 204X0. 241X0A and 
29IXO. 



LEGEND: To identify officer vacancies, 0-2 stands for first lieutenant; 
0-3 for captain. Where openings exist in the some Air Force Spe 
cialty Code (AFSC) for more than one grade, the lowest and high- 
est grades are indicated. Example: 0-2/3 means there are open 
ings for grades first lieutenant and captain Enlisted: The AFSC 
identifies both the job and the skill level. As an example, the #5 in 
62250 indicates openings for staff sergeants and airmen first class 
in the Food Services career field. Similarly, #7 refers to master and 
technical sergeants. Also as an example, X in AFSC 271X0 indicates 
openings in more than one grade. 



OFFICER 



1055 



Pilot 



1535 Navigator 



ENLISTED 



204X0 Intelligence Operator Specialist/Supervisor 

241X0A Safety Specialist/Technician (General) 

242X0 Disaster Control Specialist/Technician 

27150 Air Operation Specialist 

271X0 Air Operation Specialist/Supervisor 

274X0 Command Post Specialist 

274X0 Command Post Specialist/Supervisor 

291X0 Communications Center Specialist/Supervisor 

29352 Airborne Radio Operator 

324X0 Precision Measuring Equipment Specialist/Tech. 

42450 Aircraft Fuel Systems Mechanic 

43 131 A Aircraft Mechanic (Reciprocating Engine) 

43 151 A Aircraft Mechanic (Reciprocating Engine) 

43 171 A Aircraft Maintenance Technician (Recip. Engine) 

43 1X1 A Aircraft Maintenance Mechanic/Supervisor 

43570 Flight Engineer Technician 

461X0 Munitions Specialist/Supervisor 

471X0 Construction Equipment Repairman/Technician 

565X0 Heating Specialist/Supervisor 

571X0 Fire Protection Specialist/Supervisor 

582X0 Fabric, Leather and Rubber Repairman/Supervisor 

603X0 Vehicle Operator (Motor Trans.) Supervisor 

607X0 Aircraft Loadmaster 

A607X0 Aircraft Loadmaster 

62250 Cook 

643X0A Fuel Specialist/Supervisor (Conventional) 

70250 Administrative Specialist 

702X0 Administrative Specialist/Supervisor 

704X0 Stenographic Specialist/Technician 

75170 Education and Training Technician 

901X0 Aeromedical Specialist/Supervisor 

902X0 Medical Service Specialist/Technician 

Positions offer up to 48 paid drills, a 15-day tour of active duty an- 
nually, retirement points, and possible promotion. Applicants should 
write directly to unit of choice, giving full name, address, grade and 

Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC). 



PENNSYLVANIA 

911 TCGp., Greater Pittsburgh AP 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 274X0, 431X1A 
and 643X0A. 

912 TCGp., NAS Willow Grove 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 431X1A, 271X0 
and 571X0. 

913 TCGp., NAS Willow Grove 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC 1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 431X1A. 271X0 
and 571X0. 

TENNESSEE 

919 TCGp., Memphis MAP (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
10557. and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 43131A, 57130 and 
64330A. 

920 TCGp., Memphis MAP (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
10557 and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 43 131 A, 57130 and 
64330A. 

TEXAS 
916 TCGp., Carswell AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055C and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 57150, 62250 and 70250. 

921 TCGp., Kelly AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
10557 and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 291X0, 571X0 and 643X0. 



922 TCGp., Kelly AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 603X0, 471X0 and 461X0. 

923 TCGp., Carswell AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 291X0. 431X1A and 
901X0. 

924 TCGp., Ellington AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
1055Z and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 29352, 274X0 and 242X0. 

925 TCGp., Ellington AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
10557 and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 29352, 274X0 and 242X0. 

UTAH 
945 TCGp., Hill AFB (AFRes) Of- 
ficer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
10557 and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 431X1A, 571X0 and 
565X0. 

WASHINGTON 
941 TCGp., Paine AFB (AFRes) 
Officer: (0-2/3) openings in AFSC 
10557 and 1535. Enlisted: openings 
in AFSC 271X0, 643X0A and 
902X0 

WISCONSIN 
933 TCGp., Gen. Mitchell Field 
(AFRes) Officer: (0-2/3) openings 
in AFSC I055Z and 1535. Enlisted: 
openings in AFSC 242X0, 274X0 
and 704X0. 



10 




Reservist lawyers-in-uniform 
make the J A GAR program 
a model for the effective 
use of Reserve Forces 
professionals... 



A 



lawyer's time and advice are 
is stock in trade," was a favorite ex- 
-ession of Abraham Lincoln. 

On a cold, snowy evening last win- 
r, about 30 New York lawyers left 
jsy offices in and around Manhat- 
n to converge on the U.S. Court 
ouse at New York City's Foley 
:juare. One might imagine some 
iajor litigation as the cause for their 
leeting; instead, it was the semi- 
lonthly meeting of the New York 
ity JAGAR office. 
What is JAGAR? And why do more 
lan 35 New York lawyers contribute 
portion of their "stock in trade"? 

JAGAR is the brief title given the 
ldge Advocate General Area Rep- 
:sentative program of the U.S. Air 
prce. Col. Maurice F. Biddle, former 
;sistant executive for Reserve Af- 
ire, conceived and proposed the pro- 
•am in 1961. Maj. Gen. Albert M. 
uhfeld, the Judge Advocate General, 
SAF, approved the program, and on 
inuary 22, 1962, the JAGAR pro- 
-am was officially born. The program 
»ok the Air Force Reservist-lawyer 
ut of the individual training pro- 
■am — with its attendant periods of 
assroom training — and put him in 
Dsition to make a solid contribution 
> the objectives of the Air Force and 
s Reserve components. 

Currently, there are about 350 
\GARs in the program. Each is a 
art III MOARS assignee in Train- 
ig Category D, Pay Group D. This 
leans that they are not required to 
erform inactive duty training with 
eserve units. However, they can 
srform annual active duty for train- 
ig and earn retirement points. 

They are located in practically ev- 
ry state. Each is a lawyer and an Air 
orce Reserve officer who has been 
losen because his professional back- 
round, experience, and ability sup- 
ort the objectives of the program, 
idministered by Continental Air 
'ommand's Staff Judge Advocate, 
'ol. Chester W. Wilson, the primary 
bjectives of the JAGAR program are 
ireefold: To render legal assistance 
) eligible individuals of the Air 
dree; to give "intra-profession" as- 
stance to Judge Advocates of the 



active military establishment in con- 
nection with local laws, ordinances 
and other regulatory body directives; 
and, to conduct an internal training 
program based on materials furnished 
from the Office of The Judge Advo- 
cate General. 

In the organizational structure of 
the JAGAR program, about 70 
JAGARs have been designated co- 
ordinators for specified geographical 
areas. It is the responsibility of the 
JAGAR coordinators to serve as a 
link between the JAGARs in this area 
and the Reserve Staff Judge Advocate 
of the appropriate Air Force Reserve 
region. Coordinators are also respon- 
sible for the preparation and process- 
ing of forms necessary for the award 
of Reserve retirement points. Another 
important duty of the JAGAR coor- 
dinator is to maintain liaison with the 
legal aid agencies within his area. 

The geographic dispersal of 
JAGARs frequently results in their 
being the only Air Force Reserve 
legal representative in their respective 
locales. However, in some of the more 
densely populated areas, several 
JAGARS live or practice in close 
proximity to each other. Such is the 
case in New York City. There, short- 
ly after the program was launched, 19 
lawyer Reservists combined to form 
the New York City JAGAR Office. 




The Judge Advocate General, USAF, Maj. Gen. 
Albert K uhfeld, accepts New York City JAGAR 
Office award jrom director, Capt. Arthur Gerwin. 



Under the direction of Air Force 
Reservist, Capt. Arthur Gerwin, the 
New York City JAGARs voluntarily 
organized in order to increase their 
potential contribution to the program. 
After little more than one year of 
operation, the New York City group 
has expanded to 35 members with 
12 more awaiting processing and 
CONAC confirmation. 

These Reservists have voluntarily 
donated their time, money and knowl- 
edge toward the successful comple- 
tion of additional activities. 

Some of their accomplishments in- 
clude the following: established li- 
aison with the six accredited law 
schools in the New York area and 
counseled students on the advantages 
of a tour of extended active duty with 
the Air Force; held a law symposium 
on Reserve status for the benefit of 
all Reservists in the metropolitan 
area; demonstrated courtroom pro- 
cedures for the special agents of the 
New York Office of Special Investiga- 
tion; conducted moot general courts- 
martial for the Reservists attached to 
local Recovery squadrons; estab- 
lished a duty roster whereby one of 
the JAGAR members is accessible 
at any hour of the day or night; and 
produced a monthly publication en- 
titled "The JAGAR" for interested 
military and civilian associates. 

The efforts and con- 
scientious participation 
of JAGARs throughout 
the country have done 
much to make this pro- 
gram a success — they 
deserve and have the 
thanks and firm backing 
of General Kuhfeld and 
his Assistant Executive 
for Reserve Affairs, Lt. 
Col. Joseph Buchta, 
who recently succeeded 
Colonel Biddle. Gen. 
Kuhfeld recently wrote, 
"All of us appreciate 
the time and effort ex- 
pended to make your 
Reserve unit [NYC 
JAGAR Office] second 
to none." 






Ricks trophy winners are congratulated by Chief of Staff, den. 
Curtis LeMay (I) at AFA convention, (l-r) Col. Dalzell, Maj. 
Adams, Lt. Ernst, SSgt Robison, TSgt Wolfe, and Lt. Chambers. 




T 



scoring by all contestants in Air National Guard's Ricks 
Trophy event, proved the degree of professionalism achieved in 
ret onnaissance. Guardsmen flew RB-57s (above) in event. 



12 






WO MAJOR COMPF.TITIO OX 

Reserve Forces' flight crews were I 
conducted last month. Air National 
Guard's tactical reconnaissance)! 
groups competed for the Ricks Tro-jl 
phy at Shaw AFB, S.C., from Septn 
3-8, and Air Force Reserve's troop I 
carrier wings met at Clinton County I 
AFB, Ohio, from Sept. 8-1 1, to coral 
pete for the Loening Trophy. 

The Air National Guard's 152nd' 
Tactical Reconnaissance Group of 
Reno, Nev., was named winner of 
the 1963 Ricks Trophy, besting four i 
other Air Guard RB-57 groups in* 
the combat-simulated competition. 

Lt. Col. James W. Dalzell, 152nd i 
group commander and team captain 
in the competition, was awarded the 
trophy at the Honors Night cere- 
monies of the Air Force Associa- 
tion's 1 7th National Convention in < 
Washington, D. C. 

The 152nd scored 18,710 points 
out of a possible 21,850 in the re- 
connaissance meet which was con- 1 
ducted under direction of the Tactical 
Air Command, to which the com- 
peting units would be assigned if 
called to active duty. 

The 189th TacReconGp of Little 
Rock, Ark., was second, scoring 
17,370 points. In third place was 
the 110th TacReconGp of Battle 
Creek, Mich., with 16,570 points. 
The 190th TacReconGp of Hutchin- 
son, Kan., was fourth with 16,305, 
and the 123rd TacReconGp. of 
Louisville, Ky., was fifth. 

Members of the winning RB-57 
crew were Maj. Wayne B. Adams, 
pilot, and 1st Lt. Keith Ernst, co- 
pilot. Other team members were 1st 
Lt. Robert L. Chambers, photo in- 
terpreter; and TSgt. Robert W. Wolf, 
and SSgt. Meyers Robison, ground 
crew members. 

In the competition, each of the 
crews flew six reconnaissance sorties, 
photographing pinpoint targets in a 
six-state area — West Virginia, Ten- 
nessee, Georgia, North and South 
Carolina, and Florida. TAC referees 
scored the crews on pre-flight plan- 
ning, target coverage, photo process- 
ing and interpretation, speed and ac- 
curacy of results. 

Brig. Gen. Jack LaGrange, assist- 
ant adjutant general of Nevada for 
Air, accompanied the winning team 
to Washington to receive the trophy. 

Shortly after ANG's Ricks event, 
Air Force Reservists from three flight 




I 





...ricks and loening events 



The Ricks and Loening trophy events, tests of Reserve Forces pro- 
ficiency, demanded professional accuracy in such fields as para- 
drops of equipment (left) navigation (top, right) reconnaissance, 
and photo interpretation. Above left, Col. Earl Anderson, com- 
mander, 452nd TCWg., March AFB, Calif., accepts Loening trophy 
from retired Lt. Gen. William Hall, former CON AC commander. 



*ws of the 452nd Troop Carrier 
ing, March AFB, Calif., amassed 
fficient points to have their wing 
med winner of the seventh annual 
r Force Reserve Troop Carrier 
)mpetition. This is the third con- 
:utive win for the 452nd, com- 
anded by Col. Earl O. Anderson. 
The meet is a CONAC-wide ex- 
;ise in which the three best crews 
)m each wing compete as indi- 
iual crews and as three-crew 
ims. The purpose of the competi- 
»n is to test Air Force Reserve pro- 
iency in navigation, cargo and par- 
-oop airdrop techniques. Thirteen 
the participating wings were 
uipped with C-l 19 aircraft and one 
th C-l 23s. The 442nd TCWg., 
ichards-Gebaur AFB, Mo., equipped 
th C-l 24s did not compete. 
The best individual crew in the 
;et was led by Maj. Horace R. 
andenberger, representing the 
3rd TCWg., Kelly AFB, Tex. 
s crew were Maj. Lois Parks, co- 
ot; Capt. Roland Karnei, navigator; 
>gt. Frank Graves, flight mechanic; 
d SSgts. Max F. Schneider and 
)bert E. Lee, loadmasters. 



Colonel Anderson and Major 
Brandenberger received their awards 
at the Air Force Association con- 
vention. Colonel Anderson received 
the new Grover Loening Trophy at 
the Reserve Forces Seminar and Ma- 
jor Brandenberger received the AFA 
Trophy at the Honors Night banquet. 

Retired Lt. General William E. 
Hall, former commander of Conti- 
nental Air Command, presented the 
modernistic eagle-in-flight Loening 
Trophy. An aviation pioneer for 60 
years, Mr. Loening of Key Brisbane, 
Fla., donated the trophy which will 
be awarded yearly to the troop car- 
rier wing achieving outstanding tac- 
tical excellence. Mr. Loening was 
present for the award ceremony. 

The 452nd proved its excellence 
by outscoring its nearest rival, the 
440th- TCWg., Gen. Mitchell Field, 
Milwaukee, Wise, by 59 points. The 
452nd racked up 8,346 points to 
8,287 for the 440th and 8,203 for 
third-place 403rd TCWg. Selfridge 
AFB, Mich. 

Behind the first three finishers 
were: 4th, 434th TCWg., Bakalar 
AFB, Ind.; 5th, 349th TCWg., Ham- 



ilton AFB, Calif.; 6th, 446th TCWg., 
Ellington AFB, Tex.; 7th 459th 
TCWg., Andrews AFB, Md.; 8th, 
514th TCWg., McGuire AFB, N.J.; 
9th, 302nd TCWg., Clinton County 
AFB, Ohio; 10th, 94th TCWg., L. G. 
Hanscom Field, Mass.; 11th, 445th 
TCWg., Dobbins AFB, Ga.; 12th, 
433rd TCWg., Kelly AFB; 13th, 
512th TCWg., NAS Willow Grove, 
Pa.; and 14th, 435th TCWg., Home- 
stead AFB, Fla. 

Major Brandenberger's crew com- 
piled 3,036 points compared to 2,951 
for the second place crew led by 
Maj. Frank Parrish representing the 
459th TCWg., Andrews AFB, Md. 
Third with 2,044 points was Capt. 
Virgil W. Moore, flying for the 440th. 

The CONAC-wide competition 
consisted of all aircraft on each team 
flying a low-level navigation mission 
followed by a 1,500 foot air drop 
of heavy equipment. Each team then 
sent three aircraft on a medium alti- 
tude night navigation flight to test 
navigation and proficiency at drop- 
ping 340 pound bundles. A third 
requirement was to fly in formation 
for a personnel drop. ^^- ^- 



13 



QUESTIONS & ANSWERS 




This column is designed to clarify problems oj general 
interest to members oj the Air Reserve Forces. Personal 
problems should be discussed with your unit personnel 
officer. Letters not used in the column cannot be answered. 

Is it possible to make good retirement years while 
in the Standby Reserve? I am now in the Ready Re- 
serve and have completed ten good years of Ready 
Reserve service. Would it be possible for me to 
transfer to Standby Reserve, make good retirement 
years by completing ECI courses then apply for re- 
tirement with pay after completing the required 
number of years? Points earned in either a Ready 
or Standby status are creditable for Reserve retirement. 
They may be earned through extension course participa- 
tion with assignment to the Non-Affiliated Reserve Section 
(NARS). Such an assignment places you in Standby 
status. Provided eligibility requirements are met, applica- 
tion for retired pay may be made from this status. Eligi- 
bility criteria must include: attainment of age 60; comple- 
tion of 20 years satisfactory service of which the last eight 
were earned in a Reserve capacity; and active duty during 
World War I, World War II or the Korean conflict if a 
member of an Armed Force Reserve before Aug. 16, 1945. 
Any satisfactory service earned while assigned to NARS 
(50 points per year) will be counted toward the 20 years 
required to qualify for retired pay. 

Can a Reserve navigator with 2,000 hours total 
time, 1,400 of which were logged in military air- 
craft and 600 in civilian aircraft while employed 
as a (commercial) flight navigator, qualify for the 
senior navigator rating? If so, how does he authenti- 
cate his time? Flying time logged in civilian aircraft 
of over 450 horse power is creditable for recording on AF 
Form 5A, Individual Flight Record and for the 2,000 total 
hours needed for the rating of senior navigator. To apply 
for this rating however, the officer must be participating in 
active flying status in a Ready Reserve unit. 

What procedures are necessary for a Reserve air- 
man to apply for a direct appointment? I am a col- 
lege graduate with a BBA degree. For the last sev- 
eral years the Air Force has offered direct appointments 
to a limited number of outstanding Reserve airmen who 
have been actively participating in the Reserve program. 
This has been on a year to year basis and no assurance 
can be made that it will be continued in the future. Airmen 
considered under this program must be under 40 years of 
age and assigned to a Ready Reserve position for at least 
1 year. A college degree is not a prerequisite for appoint- 
ment. Selections are made on a "Best Qualified" basis. 
If you desire to apply for an appointment under this pro- 
gram, you should discuss it with your unit personnel offi- 
cer. If you are not assigned to a unit, we suggest you 
contact the nearest unit in order to obtain an assignment 
and establish eligibility for appointment consideration in 
the event future programs are established. In addition, 
the Air Force is accepting applications for appointment 
from individuals who are qualified to perform the duties 
of chaplain, medical or legal officer. Such individuals 
need not hold current Air Force status. 



Is a retired Reservist, and his dependents, entitle* 
to commissary , BX and medical privileges the '.urn 
as a retired active duty member? A retired Reserv 
ist who is receiving retired pay is entitled to the afl 
commissary and BX privileges as an individual who f 
retired from active duty. In order to qualify for hospital! 
zation and medical care he must have completed at leas 
8 years full time active duty in the military service. 

/ am an Air Force Reserve officer. Orders receivei 
from the Air Reserve Records Center all show m\ 
service number with an additional zero after tfi< 
AO, i.e. AO-01 23456. This is in error, as my servic 
number is AO- J 23456. Electronic Data Processin 
equipment at ARRC requires nine (9) characters for off! 
cers and ten (10) characters for airmen Air Force servid 
numbers. An officer's service number utilizes two alpha* 
betical and seven numeric digits. If there are not seve 
numeric digits, a zero is inserted between the alphabet^ 
and numeric portions of the officer's service number. Th» 
does not alter your originally issued service number ad 
your military personnel record reflects your correct servic 
number— AO-1 23456. 



AEROSPACE LIBRARY 




Sixty Days That Shook The West: The Fall of Francr 
1940, Jacques Benoist-Mechin, edited by Cyril Falls (Pu 
nam, $7.50). This definitive history of the fall of Franc 
in 1940 is written with clarity and covers, in detail, a 
military and political developments from May 9th fc 
the next sixty days — through the capitulation of France 

The Man-In-Space Dictionary: A Modern Glossan 

Martin Caidin (Dutton, $6.95). Concise definitions, clea 
non-technical explanations of nearly 1,900 terms c 
manned space explorations. Illustrated with photograph 

Navigation and Guidance In Space, Edward V. I 
Stearns (Prentice-Hall, $11.00). Many of the probleir 
of extra-terrestrial navigation that will confront the spaQ 
navigator in earth orbits, inter-planetary transfer an 
lunar transfer are examined in this volume. 

Handbook of Intelligence And Guerrilla Warfare, Ale? 

ander Orlov (Univ. of Michigan, $4.00). An analysis I 
the differences between Soviet and Western intelligenc 
operations and a description of the eight different kinc 
of Soviet intelligence. 

The Space Guidebook, William J. Weisner (Cowarc 
McCann, $5.95). This new, revised edition, in questio 
and answer form, presents the latest information on mi 
siles, space capsules, inter-planetary travel and main 
survival in outer space. Illustrated. 

The P-51 Mustang, Len Morgan (Morgan Aviatio 
Books, $2.95). The author describes his first mcetir 
with the P-51 Mustang and then traces the P-51's froi 
the drawing board to England during WW II. 



14 



Military men tvho have spent their lives in the uniform of their country acquire a unique 
tperience in preparing for war and in waging it. ISo theoretical studies, no intellectual attain- 
ents on the part of the layman can be a substitute for the experience of having lived and de- 
vered under the stress of war." Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor / Chairman, JCS 



ILITARY SUPERIORITY. In his congressional 
sentation supporting the "three-environment" (at- 
sphere; underwater; space) nuclear test ban treaty, 
retary of Defense Robert S. McNamara discussed a 
nber of important points. Excerpts: 
The United States has nuclear superiority. We are 
ermined to maintain that superiority. In order to 
ieve it, we maintain a total number of nuclear war- 
ds, tactical as well as strategic, in the tens of thou- 
ds. There have been very substantial increases in our 
:lear forces over the last five years, and further sub- 
itial increases are programmed. . . . 

I regard as essential to our national security the main- 
ance of a military posture such that we can absorb 

initial surprise attack and strike back with sufficient 
ver to destroy the aggressor. . . . 
The limited ban is, of course, only a beginning. It 
I not end the threat of nuclear war. It will not reduce 

existing stockpiles of nuclear weapons. It will not 
t the production of nuclear weapons. It will not pre- 
it qualitative weapons improvement of many kinds, 
t it will retard the proliferation of nuclear weapons, 
roliferation which would increase the risk of nuclear 
-s. And, probably more important than purely mili- 
y implications, the treaty should provide us with an 
>ortunity to test the sincerity of Soviet protestations 
>ut their desire to explore more sweeping arrangements 
preserving the peace. It provides us with this oppor- 
ity at a minimum risk. For even if the Soviets fail to 
de by this agreement and even under the doubtful 
itingency of Soviet testing in the prohibited environ- 
nts without being detected, the United States will 
intain its ability to survive a surprise attack with suf- 
ent power to destroy the Soviet Union. . . . 
'Perhaps the most serious risk of this treaty is the 
c of euphoria. We must guard against a condition of 
id which allows us to become lax in our defenses, 
is agreement is a product of Western strength. Fur- 
r progress in arms control arrangements with the So- 
t Union — progress which we will want to make — de- 
lds critically on the maintenance of that strength. 
'Thus, the risks under the treaty are either small or 
Jer our control, and the values of the treaty are sub- 
ntial even if we consider only the military area. The 
les are clearly tipped in favor of the treaty, Mr. Chair- 
n. It has my unequivocal support." 



* 



■fr 



& 



DINT CHIEFS OF STAFF position on the nuclear 
t ban treaty, as presented to the Senate Preparedness 
/estigating Subcommittee, included these points: 
"it was the judgment of the Joint Chiefs of Staff that 
ir criteria or conditions would have to be met for a 
ited test ban treaty to be compatible with the national 
urity. First, the United States should not accept lim- 
tions on testing if the Soviet Union had or could 
lieve a significant advantage in any militarily impor- 
it area of nuclear weapon technology which, under 
treaty, could not be overcome by the United States. 



Second, recognizing the possibility that the USSR might 
take advantage of an opportunity for clandestine test- 
ing, the Joint Chiefs determined that a test ban treaty 
could be accepted only if clandestine testing would have 
no seriously adverse effect on the relative balance of 
military power. Third, it was considered important that 
withdrawal from the treaty should be uncomplicated, 
allowing the United States to withdraw without undue 
delay upon acquiring reasonable evidence of a treaty 
violation or in the event our national interests were im- 
periled. Fourth, if the conditions of criteria one and two 
were not completely met, the treaty must convey ade- 
quate compensatory advantages elsewhere. . . . 

"It is the judgment of the Joint Chiefs of Staff that, 
if adequate safeguards are established, the risks inherent 
in this treaty can be accepted in order to seek the im- 
portant gains which may be achieved through a stabiliza- 
tion of international relations and a move toward a 
peaceful environment in which to seek resolution of our 
differences. . . . 

"The most serious reservations of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff with regard to the treaty are more directly linked 
with the fear of a euphoria in the West which will eventu- 
ally reduce our vigilance and the willingness of our 
Country and of our Allies to expend continued effort on 
our collective security. If we ratify this treaty, we must 
conduct a vigorous underground testing program and be 
ready on short notice to resume atmospheric testing. We 
should strengthen our detection capabilities and main- 
tain modern nuclear laboratory facilities and programs. 
Finally, we must not for a moment forget that militant 
communism remains committed to the destruction of our 
society." 



& 



& 



♦ 



Jr RESIDENTS COMMENTS: "The treaty (limited 
nuclear test ban) is not a substitute for, and does not 
diminish the need for, continued Western and American 
military strength to meet all contingencies. This treaty 
will assure the security of the U. S. better than continued 
unlimited testing on both sides." 



Air 

Force Point 
Of View 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FOB 
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID j 



USAF Recurring Publication 3fl 
No. 80-H'8-63-312,213 



RESERVE CAMERA 




O Recruiting Flight Nurses is a specialty for ANG's 111th Air Transport Gp., USNAS Willow Grove, Pa., and so the 10-month old 103rd Aeron 
Evac Fit. now boasts of being fully "manned" with 21 nurses and a waiting list. Capt. Mary Darling, chief nurse (pointing) explains MATS miss'i 
during tour of facilities. Other nurses are at Brooks AFB, Tex., receiving advanced training. Q A joint effort by Reservists of the 435th TCWj 
Homestead AFB, Fla., and the city of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., accounted for a compact TV camera arriving within hours to help in the much publicize 
rescue efforts at the Hazleton, Pa. coal mine disaster. Instrumental in the transfer of the city-owned camera were (l-r) Col. Forrest Harsh, cot 
mander, and Capts. Robert Bubier and Joseph Bachman. © The "jungle" terrain at Eglin AFB, Fla., provided realistic training for Reservists) 
the 31st Casualty Staging Sq., Denver, Colo., during summer encampment, (l-r) Capt. David Kreble, A3C Marshal Hedge, Capt. Mary Reavis and A3 
Lee Lownsberry, prepare mock casualty, A3C DeRoy Weeks, for transfer from battle area to a permanent hospital. © Crash rescue and firefightii 
are essential phases of the Air Force Reserve Recovery program. Here, Reservists of the 9216th AFRRSq., Norfolk MAP, Va., get "live" trainin 
during their two weeks active duty tour at Norfolk Naval Air Station. 



t^ W y 








» 8-63-70 



*/ 



NOVEMBER 1963 



Major air commands stress 
reliance upon Air Reserve 
Forces* professionalism . . . 




the 

reservist 

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE AIR RESERVE FORCES 







'M 



/""•O 



1 ML 



.''. l 






m 



/ /A \ i f 

£r-uUU 






i ( | 1 ( I i j s/~* 


\ jj ,, . 



the air reservist 

Vol. XV— No. 9 Nov. 1963 

AIR NATIONAL GUARD 
AIR FORCE RESERVE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 
EDITOR: 

Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 

The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of Hq USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, D.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq USAF. 



CttB 

air reservist 



3~ * M i 



" — L 

06 for the Air Guard" 



Our cover is dedicated to each of the 
participants in the recent William Tell 
fighter-interceptor competition, and 
especially Air National Guard's win- 
ning entry, the 146th FISq., Pittsburgh, 
Pa. Our picture shows the enemy, a 
Q-2C Firebee drone target, just as it 
separates from its parent ship, a C-130, 
moments before competing teams be- 
gin their hunt-and-kill procedures. 



Scann i ' n K^j)\ 




Air Force Reserve's low-budget, high-return Recovery program thrives* 
ingenuity and enthusiasm . . . here Reservists of the 9533rd AFRRU 
Wichita, Kans., conduct a recovery exercise at the Municipal Airport, aU 
million facility rented to the Reservists at a nominal rate of $265 per mr 






"Public awareness of economy 
within the defense establishment 

is necessary to obtain support from 
the people of various innovations 
planned for the military," Gen. 
Bernard A. Schriever, commander of 
the Air Force Systems Command 
said in a recent talk before the Na- 
tional Security Industrial Associa- 
tion in Washington, D. C. 

"We must conduct our business in 
an atmosphere where the public 
knows that its defense dollars are 
being spent wisely, efficiently and ef- 
fectively," he pointed out. 

He said the country cannot afford 
to have its security placed in danger 
because of a lack of management 
discipline in either military or in- 
dustry. 

The methods being used by the 
military and by defense-oriented in- 
dustry are very much in the public 
eye, he stated, and both the military 
and industry must set an example 
through proper management that they 
are worthy of the responsibilities they 
have to the nation. 

He pointed to the many steps 
taken by the Air Force in gaining this 
public respect and attaining its objec- 
tives for an effective deterrent. 

One of the important projects un- 
dertaken was "Forecast" begun in 
the spring and continued through the 
summer and early fall. "Through 



'Forecast,' " he said, "we took a lc 
ahead to evaluate our long-ra; 
technical and military requirement 

"Forecast" was conducted to f 
how the Air Force can apply expa 
ing technological principles to f 
provide for the security of the Uni 
States in the years ahead. 

The study weighed every poten 
which would dictate Air Force ca 
bility for the period 1965-75. 

Conducted by the Air Force S 
terns Command's Space Syste 
Division, it involved technologi 
scientists and strategists from ev 
area of the Air Force as well 
highly qualified experts from ind 
try, the scientific community and 
analytical field. 

Reporting on the project, Gem 
Schriever told his audience: "Ml 
of the 'Forecast' data has now b 
assembled. We are beginning to i 
sent some of our findings to the 1 
partment of Defense. 

"I think this study can be i 
portant for our future security, 
need to provide a sound basis for 
search, engineering and design c 
cepts today and in the years ahe 

"In conducting 'Forecast,' we hi 
had two objectives: first to attemp 
accelerate those areas of technol 
that have the highest payoffs, and : 
ond, to identify the translation 
these technologies into system C2 
bilities." 



iS 



ew management practices and 
new "Hard Look" at costly 

erations, resulted in a $234,692 
vings to the taxpayer by Air Force 
:serve organizations during FY '63. 
Highest estimated savings in the 
Id of real property resulted from 
agreement between a CONAC 
>op carrier group, located at a mu- 

ipal airport, and the local port 
thorities. The authorities agreed to 
rnish fire crash and rescue service 
ing Air Force equipment. Reduc- 
>n in manpower spaces because of 
resulted in dollar savings of 
05,626 annually. 

Another troop carrier group re- 
ced coal consumption by nearly 
)00 tons through a concerted effort 

all personnel. The savings, a re- 
ectable $19,700. This same group 
lied another $18,582 savings by 
taining off-peak gas rates from a 
;al utility firm and established a 
stem of hot water heating which 
rmitted operation by part-time con- 
ict personnel. Rounding out re- 
rted savings of this unit was $37,- 
4 due to their abandoning a pro- 
ved project for repairing a storm 
wer, changing it into a joint project 
th the local municipality. 
Reduced frequency of cleaning op- 
ations by contract for custodial 
rvices, particularly in those areas 
ed only part-time by Reserve per- 
nnel, were initiated by two troop 
rrier wings, a troop carrier squad- 
ti, and seven Air Force Reserve re- 
very groups, for a $6,400 savings. 
Headquarters CONAC at Robins 
-B, Ga., also saved $33,090 by 
ncelling 40 economic reptal leases 
• locations used by Reserve Re- 
very organizations and consumat- 
l 38 other leases in their place. 
These and other savings are in 
eping with the U. S. Air Force's 
ntinuing emphasis on reduced op- 
iting costs. 

number of Air Force regula- 
his and policy changes of in- 

•est to members of the Air Re- 
rve Forces have recently been pub- 
hed . Among these are: 
A change in the wording of the en- 
tment oath required of personnel 
listing in the Armed Forces. In the 
ture they will be required to swear 
the oath of enlistment to "support 
d defend the Constitution of the 
lited States against all enemies, 
reign and domestic." Previously, 
wording of that part of the oath 
quired that they swear to, "bear 
le faith and allegiance to the United 



Scanning^jj) 



States of America; . . . serve them 
honestly and faithfully against all 
enemies whomsoever." The change is 
contained in PL 87-751 amending 
Title 10, U.S. Code 501. The new 
oath applies only to enlisted men as 
the changed portion reads substan- 
tially as the oath of appointment al- 
ready administered to officers. 

Air Force regulation 36-51, pub- 
lished October 1, tells the procedure 
for attaining career Reserve status 
and states policy pertaining to active 



duty service commitments for officers 
and warrant officers. The regulation 
contains tables of eligible personnel 
categories and forms required for at- 
taining career Reserve status. 

A new manual (AFM 35-7J) im- 
plements latest Department of De- 
fense directives and revises instruc- 
tions concerning both approval and 
disapproval of applications for volun- 
tary retirement by members on and 
off extended active duty. 

see SCANNING page 4 



f 


2 


3 


4 


6 


OFFICERS 

8 10 12 14 


16 


18 


20 


22 


26 


with over 
four years 
enlisted, 

active 
service. 


0-3 


17.33 


18.17 


18.83 


19.83 


20.83 


21.67 






0-10 


56.00 


59.50 


0-2 


15.50 


15.83 


16.33 


17.17 


17.83 


18.33 
15.50 




0-9 


49.00 


49.00 


52.50 


0-1 


12.50 


13.33 


13.83 


14.33 


14.83 


0-8 


43.83 


45.50 


47.33 




















0-7 


38.50 


41.17 




















0-6 


24.50 


25.33 


29.33 


30.83 


31.50 


33.33 


36.17 










0-5 


21.00 


21.67 


22.83 


24.33 


26.17 


27.67 


28.50 


29.50 










0-4 


18.67 


19.50 


20.83 


22.00 


23.00 


24.00 


24.67 








0-3 


14.67 


15.67 


17.33 


18.17 


18.83 


19.83 


20.83 


21.33 












0-2 


12.50 


15.00 


15.50 


15.83 




















0-1 


10.00 


12.50 
























NEW PAY RATES FOR RESERVE FORCES 

Charts show new pay scales for Reservists in pay status with 
over two year's service. Rates are for one drill pay period or 
one day of active duty. Blanks indicate a duplication of amount 
at left. The pay raise is a firm recruiting incentive. Now a 
TSgt (E-6) can earn up to $44.00 for each training weekend. 


ENLISTED 

2 3 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 26 












E-9 


14.50 


14.83 


15.17 


15.50 


15.83 


16.17 


17.00 


18.67 
16.67 
15.00 










E-8 


12.17 


12.50 


12.83 


13.17 


13.50 


13.83 


14.17 


15.00 








E-7 


10.17 


10.50 


10.83 


11.17 


11.67 


12.00 


12.33 


12.50 


13.33 






E-6 


8.67 


9.00 


9.33 


9.67 


10.17 


10.50 


10.83 


11.00 










-E-5 


7.33 


7.67 


8.17 


8.50 


8.83 


9.17 


9.33 








E-4 


6.00 


6.33 


6.83 


7.17 


WARRANT OFFICERS 


E-3 


4.83 


5.17 


5.50 




W-4 


16.67 


17.83 


18.67 


19.33 


19.83 


20.50 


21.17 


22.83 


E-2 


4.00 






W-3 


14.50 


15.33 


15.83 


16.33 


16.83 


17.33 


18.00 


18.67 


19.33 


E-l 


3.67 




W-2 


12.50 


13.17 


13.67 


14.17 


14.67 


15.17 


15.67 


16.17 


16.83 




I 




W-l 


11.00 


11.50 


12.00 


12.50 


13.00 


13.50 


14.00 


14.50 


15.00 




J 




Air Force Reservists who as civilians are noted educators, used active duty 
tours to add their skills to USAF's Programmed Learning study. At Boiling 
AFB, Wash., D.C., team leader Lt. Col. McKelvie (seated) confers with 
(l-r) Capt. T. Cheesman and Majs. J. Bardell, G. Farrell, and J. Valentine. 



The tag is to be of nonlustrous ul- 
tramarine plastic, indicating the last 
name only. The tag will be centered 
directly above the right breast pocket 
on the coat, jacket or outergarment 
shirt. When authorized unit citations 
are worn above the right breast pock- 
et of the coat or jacket, the tag will 
be centered on the flap of the pocket 
immediately below the emblem. Name 
tags currently in use may be worn 
until July 1 . 

Name tags may be worn only while 
on duty on-base. 

A Reserve airlift to aid victims 
of typhoon "Gloria" on Formo- 
sa, departed Richards-Gebaur AFB, 
Kansas City, Mo., on October 20. 
The giant C-124 aircraft with a 
20,000-pound cargo of wheat, 
blankets and clothing, was manned 
by a crew of Air Force Reservists 
from the 442nd Troop Carrier Wing's 
304th Troop Carrier Squadron. 

This is the first mission of this type 
flown by Reservists who will be as- 
signed to the Military Air Transport 
Service upon mobilization. 

Crew members were: Maj. Robert 
J. Shippee, aircraft commander; Maj. 
Herbert A. James, pilot; Capts. 
Anthoney Maimer and Byron C. 
Maddox, co-pilots; Maj. Elwin S. 
Elswood and Capt. Louis J. Klugherz, 
navigators; TSgts. John L. Dike and 
Paul J. Isham, flight engineers and 
A1C John K. Gulick, loadmaster. 

The flight was scheduled to take 
the Reserve crew to Tachikawa AB, 
Japan, via California, Hawaii and 
Wake Island. They were scheduled 
to arrive in Japan on October 24, 
where the cargo would be off-loaded 
for a MAIS flighl to Taiwan. 



A revised On-the-Job Training 
Program whereby airmen will 

be required to complete certain Ex- 
tension Course Institute (ECI) Ca- 
reer Development Courses pertaining 
to their AFSC as part of their train- 
ing is being implemented by the Air 
Force. The processing and grading 
of career development courses must 
be accomplished within ECI's current 
manpower authorization. It is quite 
apparent that manpower savings will 
have to be made in other areas. One 
of the measures proposed is the dis- 
continuance of retake examinations 
on ECI courses. 

At present ECI students who fail 
a lesson may take the same examina- 
tion over in an attempt to get a better 
grade. Failure of a lesson does not 
mean a failing grade for the course, 
however, since the grades attained 
on all of the volumes or lessons in 
the course are averaged in computing 
the final (average) grade for the 
course. Further, repeated failures in 
ECI does not prevent a student from 
continuing the course in which en- 
rolled. Therefore, the elimination of 
retake examinations should have 
little effect on the successful com- 
pletion of an ECI course. In addi- 
tion, the validity of retesting by using 
the same examination is questionable. 

The Air Staff, Continental Air 
Command, and the National Guard 
Bureau have concurred in the pro- 
posed elimination of retake examina- 
tions on ECI courses, effective Jan. 1, 
1964. It is important, however, that 
all Air Reserve and Air Guard stu- 
dents be thoroughly aware of the 
change in policy, so that they will 
not count on a retake opportunity to 
pass an ECI lesson examination of 
point credit. 



Eighteen thousand feet abov« 
the Atlantic Ocean a perky 

bright-eyed young lady helps a blul 
soldier light a cigarette; a machinl 
brings a warm bottle of milk to 1 
blue-eyed baby with bandaged lea 
and a radar technician helps a cat] 
bound airman turn the pages of I 
magazine. 

Are these people "playing hospl 
tal?" Hardly! They are Air Nation! 
Guardsmen engaged in serious buJ 
ness — helping the U. S. Air ForcJ 
1454th Aeromedical EvacuatiJ 
Squadron transport gravely ill mil 
tary personnel and their depended 
from the Rhein-Main Air Base I 
Germany, back to the United Stats 

Each year for 15 days the* 
Guardsmen apply their medical skil 
and knowledge to the world-wide mis 
sion of the Military Air TranspJ 
Service's Aeromedical EvacuatiJ 
Service. They and others like the! 
make up the 103rd Aeromediq 
Evacuation Flight with headquartel 
at the USNAS Willow Grove, Pa. 1 

The pretty young lady helping tq 
blind soldier is Miss Carol Murphj 
She normally works as a pediata 
nurse in the Festerville City Hosd 
tal, Pa., but the soldier knows her J 
Lieutenant Murphy. The machinjj 
feeding the baby is Charles Schaler-j 
Staff Sergeant Schaler to his fellJ 
airmen. A1C Gilbert Canonica is th 
young radar technician who is turn 
ing the magazine pages. 

The responsibility of these Reserv 
ists, who are part of the many Re 
servits who continually train with th 
1454th Aeromed is a vital one. Rheil 
Main Air Base, is the focal point fc 
all air evacuation flights to the Unifil 
States. Patients are brought fro! 
points throughout the European tM 
ater to either the Air Force Hospits 
at Wiesbaden or the Army Hospitl 
in Frankfurt. Here the cases are d 
agnosed closely, and if it is decidd 
that the cases are serious enough t 
warrant further treatment at speciai 
ized centers in the United States, Oj 
patients are scheduled to be returno 
on an air evacuation flight. 

Since most of the persons who « 
quire return to the United States ai 
partially or totally incapable of helj 
ing themselves, it becomes the job ( 
the Aeromed Flight Nurse and th 
Aeromed Technician to see that the 
personal records, passports, shot ret 
ords and other data are in order; i 
addition to their "regular" medic; 
care. Such matters result in a grej 
deal of work for those charged wnj 
his care. 



see SCANNING page 



"MATS" Air Force Reserve units will continue to receive an even larger number of training 
ssions than ever before.. . the mission of Reserve Forces, assigned to MATS is to provide added 
tbal airlift capability . . ." General Joe W. Kelly / Commander, Military Air Transport Service 



OURTEEN Air Force Reservists 
de the change from business to 
ng suits and successfully completed 
first global airlift mission of the 
itary Air Transport Service's 
!nd Troop Carrier Wing (Reserve). 
:upations of the flying Reservists 
ged from salesman to doctor, 
fne 442nd, with headquarters at 
hards-Gebaur AFB, Mo., is made 
of five widely scattered troop car- 
groups, each equipped with C- 
!• "Globemasters." On July 1, 
>3, the 442nd and each of its 
ups were transferred from the 
tical Air Command to MATS. In 
cetime the units are under the 
imand and administrative jurisdic- 
of the Continental Air Command, 
are gained by MATS in wartime. 
TS, therefore is charged with their 
srvision of training and inspection 
ill times and also provides opera- 
al control while the units are per- 
ling MATS directed missions 
ig its routes. 

ls soon as MATS acquired the C- 
units it gave them a brand new 
gnment — becoming an active 
nber of the MATS global airlift 
e. It wasn't long before the first 
of this new role fell to the wing's 
th TCGp. and its 78th TCSq., 
l at Barksdale AFB, La. 
umbering into the air from that 
isiana base in the early dawn of 
:. 26, the squadron's C-124 was 
n by an augmented crew of 16. 
word augmented meant the crew 
a mixture of Air Force Reserv- 
Air Reserve Technicians, and 
Regular Air Force advisors, 
he big C-124, "Old Shakey," was 
id for Travis AFB, Calif., home 
tie Western Transport Air Force 
ESTAF) which is headquarters 
dATS' Pacific airlift arm. The 
l purpose of the mission was to 
>mplish a MATS assignment and 
le same time familiarize the Re- 
ists with MATS routes and pro- 
ires, and to qualify them for air- 
I positions. The Regular Air 
:e MATS flight examiners were 
ird for that purpose. 




Checking cargo ...on C-124 flown 

across Pacific by 442 nd TCWg., is 

SSgt. Willie E. Ford. 




"added global 

airlift 
capability..." 



by 

A2C Robert L. Stewart , 

Hq. Western Transport Air Force 



The aircraft was under the com- 
mand of Maj. Maurice D. Shimic, an 
Air Reserve Technician at Barksdale, 
who commented, "Flying 'Shakies' is 
not really new to me, but doing it 
for MATS and over the 'big pond' is 
a new and challenging experience." 

Like the other units of the 442nd 
wing, when the squadron belonged to 
the Tactical Air Command, its flying 
was confined to the continental U. S. 
The major, who is also the squad- 
ron's flying safety officer, added, "I'm 
glad to be in MATS, even in a Re- 
serve status, particularly because of 
its unusually high safety standards." 

This mission, with destination Ta- 
chikawa AB, Japan, via Hickam 
AFB, Hawaii, and Wake Island, saw 
the first Reserve troop carrier group 
fly a MATS mission within the 
WESTAF system since the 442nd 
TCWg. was acquired last summer. 

A year-round training program is 
standard with the 917th and this 
crew took advantage of the "Texas 
Plan," whereby a Reservist can select 
his active duty to coincide with the 
needs of the gaining command. 

"I took one week's vacation and 
one week without pay to make this 
trip," said Capt. Thomas R. Post, 
who as a civilian is a salesman. 

Besides Major Shimic and Captain 
Post, the participating Air Force Re- 
servists were: Maj. Richard S. Meri- 
am, Capts. Benjamin Voss, Harold 
W. Bierman, Albert G. Hammett, 
Guy K. MacFarland, John J. Pottier, 
MSgts. James C. Cox, Donald K. 
Scott, Edward F. Roberts, TSgt. 
Lew G. Lund, SSgts. Willie E. Ford 
and Stanley J. Yasko. The USAF ad- 
visors were: Maj. Silas S. Nettles and 
MSgt. Arthur F. Reason, Jr. 

Each of the Reservists is from the 
Shreveport, La., area and considers 
himself an ordinary citizen leading 
an ordinary life. The Air Force and 
especially MATS disagree. They 
know that men such as these are not 
only citizens, but citizen/airmen — 
forming a strong Reserve team and 
an integral segment in Air Force's 
"Total Force" structure. 




Brig. Gen. I. G. Brown, Asst. Chief NGB for Air (r) presents Spaatz Trophy 
to Lt. Col. Richard Lynch, commander 135th Air Commando Gp., Balti- 
more, Md., as Lt. Gen. Milton Reckord (I) and Col. Edwin Warfield watch. 



U SCANNING from page 4 

Praise for great Air Guard prog- 
ress and accomplishment and a 

promise of more to come as soon as 
some problems can be solved, was 
the theme of all the speakers at the 
85th Conference of the National 
Guard Association last month. 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low, as- 
sistant chief of staff for Reserve 
Forces, expressed the speakers' opin- 
ions of the Air Guard's capabilities 
and accomplishments when he said, 
"A sign in one Air Force office reads: 
'We have done so much for so many 
for so long with so little that now we 
can do everything for everybody with 
nothing." 

Maj. Gen. Winston P. Wilson, new 
chief of the National Guard Bureau, 
made his first major policy speech 
at the conference and announced 
several new concepts of importance. 

The most important of these is 
General Wilson's "One Team" con- 
cept. He plans to take several steps 
to bring the two sides of the Na- 
tional Guard Bureau, Army and Air, 
and eventually the Army and Air 
National Guard in the field much 
closer together, in order to promote 
a better exchange of ideas between 
the two forces and greater coopera- 
tion — to make the National Guard 
truly "One Team." 

General Wilson plans to hold joint 
staff meetings from the two sides of 
the Bureau. Joint exercises and plan- 
ning committees using both Army and 
Air National Guardsmen can be 
looked for in the future. 

He has urged Air National Guard 



units, who as a result of the very 
successful "Try One" program are at 
peak strength, to refer applicants to 
Army Guard units for enlistment. 

During the four-day conference, 
Guardsmen from all over the U. S. 
heard Gen. Walter C. Sweeney, Jr., 
commander, Tactical Air Command, 
praise the Guard for its participation 
in the Cuban crisis by bringing a large 
portion of its units to a ". . . high 
peak of readiness . . . only a phone 
call away from call-up." 

They heard Maj. Gen. R. J. 
Clizbe, deputy chief of staff/Plans 
for Military Air Transport Service, 
commend the efficiency and versatil- 
ity of the Air National Guard units 
assigned to MATS. He said, "As an 
example, I bring to your attention the 
recent successful aircraft transition of 
Phoenix, Arizona's 197th Air Trans- 
port Squadron. Two years ago the 
"Copperheads" performed with dis- 
tinction in Europe during the Berlin 
crisis with supersonic F-104 jet inter- 
ceptors . . . Those same Arizona 
fighter men are now piloting C-97 
transports and doing a great job of it." 

As another example General Clizbe 
mentioned the seven Air National 
Guard squadrons who transitioned 
from twin-engine C-119s to four- 
engine C- 12 Is recently. They re- 
ceived training from both the active 
Air Force and from Naval personnel. 
The General Clizbe commended the 
Guard on the fine job they had done. 

High-level speakers at the con- 
ference also made mention of the 
problems the Air Guard faces and 
offered some answers. Both General 



Sweeney and Secretary of the A 
Force Zuckert made mention of t" 
perennial equipment problem in t 
Reserve Forces. Both also saw so 
reason for hope. General Sween 
said that though there had been 
small delay in equipping Guard u 
with century-series aircraft, this del 
had now been surmounted and tl 
flow of new equipment into regul 
forces will soon release more aircra 
for assignment to Guard units. 

For the first time in the history 
the Air National Guard's Spaatl 
Trophy presentations, both first anj 
second place winners this year werB 
from the same state. They were thfl 
135th Air Commando Group of 
Baltimore, Md., which won thJ 
coveted award with a score of SSm 
points out of a possible 900, and itl 
neighboring 175th Tactical Fight J 
Group, also of Baltimore, whicB 
placed second. 

The trophy is awarded annually to 
the ANG tactical flying unit judge! 
outstanding in flying safety, averagi 
annual in-commission rate, unit alert! 
reenlistments, officer and airman maJ 
ning and operational readiness. 

The 135th can claim another fir! 
as it is the first non-jet unit to tM 
ceive the coveted award. 

This year's presentation wai 
made at the National Guard AssM 
ciation convention in Philadelphia 
Pa. Less than a month earlier thl 
135th received the Air Force Asso- 
ciation's Outstanding Unit Award.' 
Last month's AIR RESERVIST 
magazine inadvertently reported the 
135th as having received the WinB 
ton P. Wilson Trophy. The latter 
trophy was won this year by the 
155th Fighter Group, Lincoln AFB 
(Neb.- ANG). The Winston P. Wil- 
son Trophy is awarded to ANG's 
outstanding all-weather fighter unl 
This is the second year in a ro« 
that the 155th has received the trl 
phy. It was presented during thfl 
annual Night Fighter Association's 
September meeting in Wash., D. (J 
Other presentations made during 
the National Guard Association coi 
vention included trophies presented 
to the top Air Defense Command. 
Tactical Air Command and Militajl 
Air Transport Service ANG units. I 
Receiving the TAC award was the 
1 13th Tactical Fighter Group, (D.C.- 
ANG) of Andrews AFB, Md. 

Named top ADC unit was the 
158th Fighter Group, Burlingtor 
MAP, (Vermont-ANG). 

Top MATS unit was the 13811 
Air Transport Group of Tulsa ant 
Oklahoma City, (Okla.-ANG). 



i\r Force views on proposed 
enior Reserve Officer Training 

-orps legislation were presented re- 
entry to the House Committee on 
^rmed Services. 

The gist of testimony by Benjamin 
V. Fridge, special assistant to the 
lecretary of the Air Force for man- 
tower, personnel and Reserve Forces, 
ras that the ROTC law should be 
lodernized to place more emphasis 
n present needs of the military. 

Mr. Fridge said that the major 
ifficulties of the program at present 
ire the result of the outmoded legis- 
ation of 1916 which established the 
IOTC to produce large numbers of 
ollege trained officers for an inactive 
eserve force. The restrictive nature 
)f the act made it impossible to alter 
he present program to fit its new 
nission, that of providing both reg- 
ilar and reserve officers for the ac- 
ive establishment. 

Mr. Fridge urged legislation which 
vould permit the implementation of 
i two-year merit scholarship program 
o supplement and perhaps replace 
he present four-year ROTC pro- 
;rams. He told the legislators that 
he proposed legislation (HR 8130) 
hould provide sufficient incentive to 
:ause many young men to apply for 
raining under the program and thus 
>rovide a broad base of selection; 
nake it possible for all sophomores 
n college, including junior college 
ransfers, to compete for enrollment 
inder the program and further 
>roaden the base of selection; make 
t easier for quality science and engi- 
leering students to enroll; make it 
>ossible to be more selective in in- 
tructor assignments by reducing the 
lumber of officers required to teach 
ind lower the cost of the program 
vhen fully implemented by having 
nilitary instruction provided on mil- 
iary establishments. 

The Air Force favors an in-college 
>fficer development program rather 
han having to rely solely on Officer 
[raining Schools for its annual in- 
>ut of 13,000 new officers. 

In summarizing, Mr. Fridge said: 
'Our alternatives are (1) to continue 
he present ROTC program under 
he restrictive 1916 laws; (2) rely 
nore heavily on producing officers 
rom OTS to the exclusion of ROTC, 
vhich 1 feel sure is unacceptable 
)oth to the Air Force and the edu- 
:ational institutions; or (3) improve 
he present ROTC system to make 
oday's and tomorrow's production 
n line with today's and tomorrow's 
leeds." 





© 




J 




Maj. Gen. James Cantwell, Pres., 
National Guard Assn., (at right in 
each photo) presents NGA awards 
to top Guard units of Air Force's 
major air commands. Accepting are 
(1) Lt. Col. Robert Goyette for 
158th FtrGp., Burlington, Vt., 
(ADC) (2) Maj. Gen. William 
Abendroth and Col. William Mc- 
Call, for 113th TacFtrGp., Wash., 
D.C. (TAC) (3) Lt. Col. Gerald 
Stevenson, for 138th AirTransGp., 
Tulsa, Okla., (MATS). 



BRIEFLY... 

Civil Air Patrol's International Air 
Cadet Exchange program may be- 
come world-wide if negotiations be- 
tween the Australian Commonwealth 
Air Patrol and Asian nations are 
satisfactorily concluded. Col. A. A. 
Wilson, deputy commander of the 
Australian CAP, reports that his 
organization has high hopes of estab- 
lishing an Asian Exchange similar 
to the present one by 1964. Coun- 
tries in agreement are Malaysia, Ja- 
pan, Formosa, Burma, India, Paki- 
stan and Thailand, while others are 
still considering the program. Par- 
ticipating in CAP's present Interna- 
tional Exchange are countries of Eu- 
rope, Central and South America, the 
Near East, Canada and the U.S. . 

Being "good neighbors" with the 
local Air National Guard has resulted 
in a bonanza for cadets of three Civil 
Air Patrol squadrons at Charleston, 
(W.Va's.) Kanawha Airport. Lt.Col. 
E. E. Price, CAP's Area Two co- 
ordinator and Maj. Fleetwood Gun- 
thrie, commander of the ANG's 
130th Troop Carrier Squadron, have 
scheduled a series of orientation 
flights for the CAPers. The flights, 
which are made in a HU-16B Alba- 
tross', have been manned by the same 
Air Guard crew, who volunteered 
their services. 



A Board will convene at Air Re- 
serve Records Center on January 6-7 
to consider approximately 250 ma- 
ors, captains, and 1st lieutenants, for 
unit or mobilization assignment va- 
cancies. To be eligible, majors and 
captains must have a promotion serv- 
ice date on or before November 30, 
1959, and 1st lieutenants, on or be- 
fore November 30, 1961. Recom- 
mendations by commanders must be 
received by December 6, 1963. 




"quality and 

productive 

accomplishments" 



-L here's no such thing, in our 
eyes, as an active Air Force man and 
an Air Guardsman. They're all part 
of GEE1A and the only question we 
ask is, "Can they do the job?" 

The speaker, standing in the hot 
Florida sun, was gazing up at a 
Saturn missile that rested majestically 
on its launching pad at Cape Canav- 
eral. He pointed to some airmen 
who were working about half-way 
up the multi-tiered gantry that sur- 
rounded the missile. "Those men," he 
said, "are from a New York Air Na- 
tional Guard GEEIA unit. They're 
installing a communications system 
that will link the missile area with 
the control bunker. They come out 
here and do a day's work with the 
best the Air Force has to offer and 
they require little or no supervision 
or technical guidance. They're pro- 
fessionals." 

This man was not a casual ob- 
server. He was an official from Head- 
quarters, Ground Electronics Engi- 
neering Installation Agency 
(GEEIA) — a highly technical arm 
of the Air Force where nothing less 
than perfection is acceptable. The 
Air Guardsmen he was watching 
were members of the 213th GEEIA 
Squadron of Roslyn, N.Y., one of 
15 GEEIA and two communications 
maintenance squadrons of the ANG 
which have been quietly but steadily 
redefining the word "training" over 
the past six years. Today, "doing" has 
replaced "training" and no one is 
more pleased with the result than the 
Air Force. 

I ach summer, in vital Air Force 
installations across the country — 



from Vandenberg Air Force Base in 
California to Cape Canaveral in Flor- 
ida — nearly 2500 of these Guards- 
men spend their two-week active duty 
encampments working on high-prior- 
ity jobs which have included Minute- 
man and Atlas projects, as well as 
support of John Glenn's Mercury 
shot. In addition, they have installed 
new telephone systems, expanded old 
ones, strung wire, laid cable, erected 
antennas, installed intercom and 
radar systems and repaired radios. 
But for these Guardsmen, many jobs 
would have been delayed for weeks 
and even months — and even then, be- 
cause of the heavy commitments of 
the active Air Force GEEIA units, 
they would have to be given out to 
private contractors. It has been esti- 
mated that during this year's field 
training period alone, the Air Guard 
GEEIA-men put in more than 90,- 
000 productive man hours on active 
Air Force projects and in so doing, 
have saved the Air Force nearly 
$800,000. 

These Air Guard GEEIA and com- 
munications squadrons are located in 
13 states: California, Georgia, Illi- 
nois, Louisiana, Maine, Massachu- 
setts, Missouri, New York, Okla- 
homa, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Tex- 
as and Washington. Officially, they 
are assigned to the Air Force Logis- 
tics Command, but the training re- 
sponsibility for them has been dele- 
gated to Headquarters, GEEIA, at 
Griffiss AFB, Rome, N. Y. 

A scant ten years ago, the summer 
training of these units consisted of 
little more than putting up two tele- 
phone poles and stringing wires be- 
tween them, and then taking it all 
down again for the next team to work 
with. In short, they practiced — over 
and over again— against the time 
when they might be mobilized and 
called upon to do a real job. Today, 
the jobs come their way as fast as 
they can handle them, and mobiliza- 
tion, should it come, would only serve 
to intensify their activities, not to 
alter them. 

How have these units progressed 
from part-time airmen to qualified 
professionals in less than a decade? 
The answer is, they haven't changed 
— at least, not to any great extent. 
The Air Force has just recognized 
their capabilities and has begun to 



'Si '» 



-m \ 



''''The effectiveness oj\\ 
the productive accomplish 
the personnel involved." 






Typical of Air National Guard's 

continuing cooperation 

with the Regular Air Force in 

accomplishing GEEIA missions is 

this scene at Cape Canaveral 

in the shadow of a Saturn missile's 

multi-tiered gantry . . . side-by-side 

Guardsmen and Regulars 

"get the job done." 




Guard GEEIA] training program is shown by the quality and 
fig these training sessions and the increased technical skill of 

Brig. Gen. Haskell E. Heal/ Commander, GEEIA 



use them for day-to-day USAF-pro- 
grammed projects. 

These qualifications are consider- 
able. In the 213th Squadron, for ex- 
ample, six of the eight officers are 
employed by the New York Tele- 
phone Company and 45 out of the 
92 men who were at Cape Canaveral 
this summer work in closely related 
fields — mostly with local telephone 
companies and electronics firms. In 
addition, 57 of the Guardsmen are 
technical school trained, having grad- 
uated from courses that average nine 
months in length, and 1 5 have served 
previously on active duty in the com- 
munications field. As if this weren't 
enough, an impressive 65 per cent of 
the unit members have had some col- 
lege training. With this kind of pro- 
fessionalism, it would have been a 
waste of manpower not to use the 
Guardsmen. 

So effective have the Air Guard 
GEEIA squadrons been, in fact, that 
the Air Force is now using them the 
year 'round — during their regular 
weekend training assemblies as well as 
during summer encampment. While 
it is impossible for the units to travel 
to distant air bases more than once a 
year, they find plenty to do right 
around home. Most GEEIA squad- 
rons are located in dense population 
areas, near active Air Force or the 
larger Air National Guard installa- 
tions, and they find no dearth of 
equipment to install and repair. 

National Guard "training" has 
come a long way from the 1941 
Louisiana Maneuvers when equip- 
ment was so short that brooms were 
used for machine guns and trucks 
were labeled "tank." Indeed, a revo- 
lution has taken place, almost unob- 
served, and the Air Guard GEEIA 
units have been leading the way. Per- 
haps the best measure of how far they 
have come can be drawn from a state- 
ment made recently in an official Air 
Force letter of commendation to one 
of the GEEIA units from California. 
"Personnel of the 216th GEEIA 
Squadron [the commendation reads] 
conducted themselves in a very com- 
petent and professional manner. They 
required no technical guidance or su- 
pervision. They also provided valu- 
able training for our assigned main- 
tenance technicians." 

That's quite a compliment for a 
bunch of part-timers. 



QUESTIONS & ANSWERS 




How do / apply for EAD? Please send me the nec- 
essary forms and any pertinent information about 
recall. I am a pilot, but if necessary would consider 
recall in a nonrated specialty. The recall quota for 
nonrated officers for FY '64 has been filled. Lieutenants 
who have not reached age 34 and captains who have not 
reached age 37 are being considered for recall in a rated 
specialty provided individual has flown a military aircraft 
since July 1, 1959. There is no requirement at the present 
time for helicopter pilots and navigators. Officers are re- 
called for an indefinite period and in the permanent Re- 
serve of the Air Force grade held at time of recall. Officer 
should complete AF Form 125, in duplicate, and submit 
it through his Reserve unit of assignment to ARRC, for 
review and recall consideration. Submission of application 
is not a guarantee of EAD. 

My retirement year ended on June 30. I forwarded 
ECI course completions to the Institute on July 1 
expecting them to be dated in July and credited to 
the following retirement year. The ECI certificates 
were dated June and points posted to the wrong 
year. Why? Page 11, ECI Catalog, 1963, indicates that 
Reservist's answers to examinations are predated five days 
from receipt in the Institute. Reserve personnel requesting 
credit in a particular year should allow five days for pre- 
dating or forward the answers by certified mail as certified 
mail will be dated upon receipt in the Institute. 

/ am an Air Force Reservist assigned to a troop 
carrier unit. Can I obtain a conditional release in 
order to transfer to the Air National Guard? You 

may request a conditional release for the purpose of trans- 
ferring to the ANG. Processing procedures are contained 
in paragraph 10c, AFR 45-35. Release of members of 
the Air Force Reserve (not on extended active duty) for 
transfer to the ANG for the sole convenience of the in- 
dividual is not authorized, and such transfer must be 
necessary and in the best interests of the Air Force. The 
approval of such a request lies with the Air Force Reserve 
unit commander or commander of the administrative unit 
having custody of the field personnel records. 



EXTENSION COURSES 




The Extension Course Institute (ECI), Gunter AFB, 
Ala., announced recently that 14 ECI courses have been 
deleted from the Institute's curriculum and beginning 
early this month will be reactivated as Career Develop- 
ment Courses. This action is being taken to coincide 
with the Air Force's revised on-the-job training program, 
which now splits it into two phases, practice and theory. 
The practical training of students will still come from 
immediate supervisors; theory will be available through 
correspondence study of the career development courses. 

A total of 17 career development courses have been 
prepared, but students should not apply for these courses 
until notification is received from ECI that they are 
available. Then, applications must be approved by edu- 
cation or training officers as applicable. Listed below 
are the deleted ECI courses, the new career develop- 
ment courses, their title and the Air Force Specialty 



Code to which they apply. 

ECI NO. CDC No. A( sr 

3027 30150 Aircraft Radio Repairman 30150 
'3028 30111 Aircraft Electronic Navigation Equip 30151B 
3051A Repairman (Genj 

3230 32350 Defensive fire Control Systems 32350 

Mechanic 

4213 42350 Aircraft Electrical Repairman 423 50 

4213 44150 Missile Electrical Specialist 44150 

4221 42250 Instrument Repairman 42250 

4231 42151 Propeller Repairman 42151 
4241 42251 Mechanical Accessories and Equipment 42251 

Repairman 

4251 42152 Aircraft Pneudraulic Repairman 42152 

4251 44250 Missile Pneudraulic Repairman 44250 

4311 43251 Reciprocating Engine Mechanic 43251 

4312 43250 Jet Engine Mechanic 43250 

4313 43112 Aircraft Mechanic Reciprocating 43 151 A 

Engine Aircraft 

4315 43111 Aircraft Mechanic, Jet 43151 C&E 
,„, ..... ,, ,. and 43171 C&E 

4351 43150 Helicopter Mechanic 43150 

4621 46250 Weapons Mechanic 46250 

5341 53450 Airframe Repairman 53450 

* Courses 3028 and 3051 A will be held open temporarily to permit stu- 
dents who have completed either course to enroll in the other, rather 
than in the CDC. The combination of courses 3028 and 3051A will 
provide the student with information identical to that in CDC 30111. 



AEROSPACE LIBRARY 




Animal Astronauts: They Opened the Way to the Stars 
Majors Clyde R. Bergwin and William T. Coleman' 
USAF (Prentice-Hall, $3.95). A study of the contribu- 
tions made by animals to the USAF and Soviet space 
programs and the continuing need for them in research. 

They Call It Intelligence: Spies and Spy Techniques 
Since World War II, Joachim Joesten (Abelard-Schuman, 
$5.50). The author describes the structure of key espi- 
onage agencies in the U. S., England, France, the two 
Germanies and Russia. 

Famous Pioneers In Space, Clarke Newlon (Dodd, 
Mead, $3.00). A brief look into the lives of seventeen 
pioneers of space including such personalities as God- 
dard, Van Allen, Von Karman, General Schriever, the 
astronauts and cosmonauts. 

Flights Of The Astronauts, William R. Shelton, illus- 
trated by Robert Curran (Little, Brown, $3.75). The 
space flights of Alan Shepard, Virgil Grissom, John Glenn 
and Scott Carpenter, as told by an observer. 

Conflict In The Shadows: The Nature and Politics of 
Guerrilla War. James Eliot Cross (Doubleday, $3.95) 
An analysis of the history of guerrilla warfare, military 
and political implications and the means of combatting it. 

The United States In World War I, Don Lawson 
(Abelard-Schuman, $3.50). An account of the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces of WWI. 

"Ta Ta, Tan Tan" ("Fight fight, talk talk"): The In- 
side Story Of Communist China, Valentin Chu (Norton 
$4.95). "Fight fight, talk talk" is a phrase used by the 
Communists describing their subjugation of China. 

A Short History of Espionage: From The Trojan Horse 
to Cuba, Allison Ind, Col., AUS (Ret) (McKay, $5.50). 
A history of spies, spying and counterspying by a man 
who helped organize Air Intelligence at Manila and Min- 
danao during WWII. 



10 



ted 



ALABAMA 
Field, Det. 5, 13 Mbl. Comm. 
Officer: (0-2/3 one opening in 
SC 3034). Enlisted: 272X0A&B, 
IT, 293X0, E-3/5; 303X1, E- 
304X1, E-4/5; 304X4, E-4/7; 
X0. E-3/5; 421X3, E-2/5; 
X0B, E-4. 

ARIZONA 

Monthan AFB, Det. 5, 11 Mbl. 
nm. Sq. Enlisted: 272X0A&B. 
/7; 293X0, E-4/5; 303X1, E- 

304X1, E-4/5. 
le AFB 

)et. 7, 12 Mbl. Comm. Sq. Offi- 
er (0-2/3 one opening in 
634B). Enlisted: 272X0A&B, E- 
/7; 303X1, E-4/6; 304X1, E- 
/5; 304X4, E-6/7; 363X0, E-4/5; 
21X3, E-3/5; 646X0, E-5. 
Jet. 4, 12 Mbl. Comm. Sq. En- 
isted; 272X0A&B, E-3/7; 303X1, 

■4/6; 304X1, E-4/5; 304X4, 

■3; 363X0. E-3/5; 421X3. E- 

/6. 

102 Air Rescue Sq. Enlisted 

i21X2, E-3; 432X1, E-4/5 

,31X1 A, E-3/5; 534X0, E-3. 

>46X0, E-3/5; B921X0B, E-5/7. 

CALIFORNIA 
ilton AFB, Det. 5, 12 Mbl. 
mm. Sq. Officer: (0-2/3 two 
:nings in 3034). Enlisted 

X0A&B, E-3/7; 293X0, E-4/5 
>X1, E-4/6; 304X1, E-3/5 
1X4, E-3/5. 
irch AFB 

Bet. 7, 11 Mbl. Comm. Sq. Offi- 
:er: (0-2/3 one opening in 
1034). Enlisted: 272X0A&B. E- 

/7; 303X1, E-4/6; 304X4, E- 
3/7; 363X0, E-3; 421X3, E-2/6. 
Det. 6, 12 Mbl. Comm. Sq. Offi- 
cer: (0-3 one opening in 1634B). 
D-2/3 one in 3034). Enlisted 
272X0A&B. E-4/7; 293X0, E-6 
303X1, E-3/6; 304X1, E-4/5 
363X0, E-3/5. 

303 Air Rescue Sq. Officer: (O 
2/3 one opening in 1035A). (O 
one in 1035A). Enlisted 
271X0, E-4; 301X0, E-5/6 
301X1B, E-4/5; 431X1A, E-3/5 
646X0, E-4/5; B921X0B, E-5 
922X0A, E-4/5. 

ler AFB, 12 Mbl. Comm. Sq. 
ficer: (6-3 one opening in 
34B). (0-4 one in 1634B). (O- 
3 one in 6424). Enlisted: 
2XOA&B, E-4/5; 291X0, E-4/7; 
3X0, E-3/5; 303X1, E-5/6; 
4X0, E-3; 304X1. E-4/6; 304X4. 
4/7; 3&3XO, E-3/5; 421X3, E-3. 
'is AFB, Det. 2. 12 Mbl. Comm. 
|. Enlisted: 272XOA&B, E-4/7; 
3XO, E-4/6; 303X1. E-4/6; 
4X1, E-3; 304X4, E-3/7; 421X3, 
•4/5. 

FLORIDA 

nestead AFB, 301 Air Rescue Sq. 
fficer: (0-2/3 one opening in 
)35A), (0-4 one in 1035A), (0-3 
le in 3234C). Enlisted: A293X2. 
-4/5; 301X0, E-4/6; 301X1B, E- 
15; A431X1A, E-4/5; 431X0, E- 
/9; 432X1, E-4/5; 434X0. E-6; 
16X0. E-4/5; 702X0, E-3/5; 
'32X0B, E-6; B921X0B, E-5/7. 



MacDill AFB, Det. 6, 13 Mbl. 
Comm. Sq. Officer: (0-2/3 one 
opening in 1634B. Enlisted 
272X0A&B, E-4/7; 293X0. E-4/5 
303X1, E-4/5; 363X0, E-4/5 
421X3, E-4/6. 

GEORGIA 

Hunter AFB, Det. 3, 13 Mbl. Comm. 
Sq. Officer: (0-2/3 one opening in 
1634B), (0-2/3 one in 3034). En- 
listed: 272X0A&B, E-4/7; 293X0, 
E-4/5; 303X1. E-4/6; 421X3. 
E-2/5; 646X0, E-4/5. 

Robins AFB, Det. 7. 13 Mbl. Comm. 
Sq. Officer: (0-2/3 one opening in 
3034). Enlisted: 272XOA&B, E- 
3/7; 293X0, E-3/5; 303X1, E-3/6; 
363X0, E-4/5. 

ILLINOIS 

Scott AFB, 11 Mbl. Comm. Sq. Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3 one opening in 1634B). 
Enlisted: 272X0, E-6/7; 291X0, E- 
2/7; 293X0, E-3/7; 304X0, E-4/5; 
304X1, E-6; 304X4, E-3; 363X0, 
E-4/5; 421X3, E-2/5; 471X1. E- 
4/5; 646X0, E-4/5; 702X0, E-4/5. 

MICHIGAN 

Self ridge AFB, Det. 1, 11 Mbl. 
Comm. Sq. Officer: (0-2/3 one 
opening in 3034). Enlisted: 
272X0A&B, E-4/7; 304X4, E-3. 
305 Air Rescue Sq. Officer: (O- 
2/3 one opening in 1035A), (O- 
4 one in 1035A), (O-S one in 
1035A). (0-3 one in 3234C). En- 
listed: 301X1B. E-3/7; 431X1A, 
E-4/5; 434X0. E-6; 702X0. E-3; 
B921X0B, E-5/7; 922X0A, E- 
4/5. 

MISSOURI 
Richards-Gebaur AFB, Det. 2, 11 

Mbl. Comm. Sq. Officer: (0-2/3 
one opening in 1634B), (0-2/3 one 
in 3034). Enlisted: 272XOA&B, E- 
4/7; 303X1, E-4/6; 304X1, E-3; 
421X3, E-3/5; 732X0B. E-4. 

NEBRASKA 
Offutt AFB, Det. 3, 11 Mbl. Comm. 
Sq. Enlisted: 272X0A&B, E-4/7; 
293X0, E-3; 303X1, E-4/6; 304X1, 
E-4/5; 304X4, E-6/7; 421X3, 
E-4/5. 

NEW YORK 
Suffolk Co. AFB, Det. 4. 11 Mbl. 
Comm. Sq. Enlisted: 272X0A&B. 
E-4/7; 293X0, E-3/6; 303X1, E- 
3/6; 304X1, E-3/5; 304X4, E-3/5; 
363X0, E-4/5; 421X3, E-4/5; 
646X0, E-5; 732XOB. E-4. 

OHIO 
Wright-Patterson AFB, Det. 6, 11 
Mbl. Comm. Sq. Officer: (0-2/3 
one opening in 1634B). Enlisted 
272X0A&B. E-4/5; 293X0, E-3/5 
303X1, E-4/6; 304X4, E-4/5 
363X0, E-3; 421X 3. E-2/5. 

OKLAHOMA 
Tinker AFB, 13 Mbl. Comm. Sq. 
Officer: (0-4 one opening in 
1634B). Enlisted: 272X0A&B. E- 
3/7; 291X0, E-2/7; 293X0, E-3/7 
301 X IB, E-7; 303X1, E-4/6 
304X0, E-3/5; 304X1, E-4/6 
304X4, E-3; 363X0. E-4/5: 421X3 
E-2/5; 471X1, E-4/5; 702X0, E-4 
732X0B, E-4. 



LEGEND: To identify Air Force Reserve vacancies, 0-2 stands for first 
lieutenant; 0-3 for captain; 0-4 for major; 0-5 for lieutenant 
colonel. Where openings exist in the same Air Force Specially Code 
(AFSC) for more than one grade, the lowest and highest grades 
are indicated. Example: 0-2/5 means there are openings for 
grades first lieutenant through lieutenant colonel. Enlisted: The 
AFSC identifies the job title. The letter X" in an AFSC (646X0) 
indicates openings in more than one grade. E-2 indicates airman 
third class; E-3, A2C; E-4, A1C; E-5, SSgt; E-6, TSgt; E-7, MSgt; 
E-8, SMSgt; and E-9, CMSgt. Example: 702X0, E-3/7 indicates 
openings for airmen second class to master sergeant in the adminis- 
trative career field. The following vacancies are at Air Force Reserve 
Mobile Communication and Air Rescue Squadrons. 



OFFICER 

1035A Pilot Search Rescue 3234C 

1634B Air Traffic Controller 3034 

6424 Supply 



Avionics (other) 
Communications 



ENLISTED 

271X0 Air Operations Spec/Supv 

272X0A&B Air Traffic Control Opr/Tech (other and Radar) 

291X0 Comm Ctr Spec/Supv 

293X0 Ground Radio Opr/Opns Supv 

A293X2 Airborne Radio Opr 

301X0 Acft Radio Rpmn/Tech 

301 XI B Acft Elect Nav Equip Rpmn/Tech 

303X1 Air Traffic Control Radar Rpmn/Tech 

304X0 Radio Relay Equip Rpmn/Tech 

304X1 Fit Facilities Equip Rpmn/Tech 

304X4 Ground Radio Comm Equip Rpmn/Tech 

363X0 Comm & Relay Ctr Equip Rpmn/Supv (electro- 

mech) 

421X3 Aerospace Ground Equip Rpmn/Tech 

431X1A Acft Mech/maint tech (recip eng) 

A431X1A Acft Mech/Maint Tech (Recip Eng)— flying 

432X1 Recip Engine Mech/Tech 

434X0 Maint Analysis Tech 

471X1 Automotive Rpmn 

534X0 Airframe Rpmn 

646X0 Organ Supply Spec/Supv 

702X0 Admin Spec 

732X0B Personnel Spec/Tech (Manual) 

B921X0B Rescue & Survival Spec/Tech (para-scuba) 

922X0A Personal Equip Spec (general) 

Positions offer up to 48 paid drills, a 15-day tour of active duty 
annually, retirement points, and possible promotion. Applicants 
should write directly to unit of choice, giving full name, address, 
grade and Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC). 



OREGON 
Portland IAP, 304 Air Rescue Sq. 
Officer: (0-3 one opening in 
1035A). Enlisted: 431X1A. E-3/5; 
A431X1A, E-4/5; 431X0. E- 
8/9; 434X0, E-6: 646X0, E-6; 
732X0B, E-5; B921X0B, E-5. 

TEXAS 

Bergstrom AFB, Det. 1, 13 Mbl. 
Comm. Sq. Enlisted: 272X0A&B, 
E-3/7; 304X4, E-4/7; 421X3, E- 
3/5; 732X0B, E-4. 

James Connally AFB, Det 2, 13 
Mbl. Comm. Sq. Officer: (0-2/3 
one opening in 3034). Enlisted 
272X0A&B, E-4/7; 293X0, E-4/6 
303X1, E-4/6; 304X1. E-3/5 
304X4, E-3; 363X0, E-3/5; 421X3 
E-2. 



Kelly AFB, Det. 4, 13 Mbl. Comm 
Sq. Enlisted: 272X0A, E-3/7 
293X0, E-4/5; 304X1, E-4/5 
304X4, E-4/5; 363X0, E-4/5 
421X3, E-3/6. 

UTAH 
Hill AFB, Det. 1, 12 Mbl. Comm. 
Sq. Officer: (0-2/3 one opening in 
3034). Enlisted: 272X0A&B, E-3/5; 
293X0. E-3; 303X1, E-4/6; 304X4, 
E-3; 421X3, E-2/5; 646X0, E-5. 

WASHINGTON 
Fairchild AFB, Det. 3, 12 Mbl. 
Comm. Sq. Officer: (0-2/3 one 
opening in 3034). Enlisted 
272X0A&B, E-3/7; 293X0, E-6 
303X1, E-4/6; 304X4, E-3/7 
363X0, E-4/5. 



All Air National Guard units are eligible, and encour- 
aged to make known their officer and enlisted personnel 
vacancies through publication in the "Help Wanted" 
section of "The Air Reservist" magazine. To do so, send 
unit lists to: National Guard Bureau, Office of Public 
Affairs, Pentagon, Wash. 25, D. C. 



n 



"ADC is proud to have the Air Guard as full-fledged members of the Air Defense 

team. They provide a stability that is vitally important to us. 

They stand their share of runway alerts . . . Thank God for the Air Guard . . ." 

Lt. Gen. Herbert B. Thatcher, 

Commander, Air Defense Command 






A, 



At National Guard's representative 
fighter-interceptor team went into the 
recent William Tell competition with 
the idea that whatever trophies were 
available they were going to win 
them — and that's just about what they 
did. In all, the Guard's 146th Fighter 
Interceptor Sq., Greater Pittsburgh 
Airport, Pa., came away with every 
possible first place industry award and 
two of the three military trophies. 

Host for this year's William Tell 
event was the Air Defense Command, 
commanded by Lt. Gen. Herbert B. 
Thatcher. 

Besides Air National Guard's team, 
captained by Maj. George C. Mc- 
Crory, the other participants repre- 
sented the Air Defense Command, the 
Alaskan Air Command, the Pacific 
Air Forces and the United States 
Air Forces Europe. A total of 14 
fighter interceptor squadrons — the 
finest from their respective commands 
— fought a head-to-head battle in the 
air over the Gulf of Mexico and on 
the ground at Tyndall AFB, Fla., in 
as realistic a demonstration of U. S. 
Air Force fighter power as is possi- 
ble, short of actual combat. 

The contest was divided into three 
events because of the difference in 
aircraft and weapons used by the par- 
ticipants. The Air National Guard 
team flew the F-102 "Delta Dagger," 
and fired the radar homing Falcon 
air-to-air missile in their efforts to 
hit the common enemy the Q-2C Fire- 
bee drone target. Four teams piloted 
the newest and most advanced F-106 
Delta Dart, while four other teams 
used the F-101 Voodoo aircraft. The 
F-102 is the oldest of the Century 
Series fighter aircraft used, having 
come into the ADC inventory in 
April 1956. Besides the Falcon, F- 
101 and F-106 teams fired the less 
complex but more spectacular MB-1 
Genie air-to-air rocket. 

The teams were graded on ability 
to shoot down the drone targets at 
altitudes above and below 50,000 
feet and during night missions. Points 




F-102s flown and serviced 
by Air Guardsmen set new 
records at William Tell. 




"thank God 

for the 
Air Guard" 



by 

Captain Norman S. Burzynski 

1 12th Fighter Croup 



were also won or lost for the coi 
peting teams as hard working grouf 
crews vied with each other in 
weapons loading event. 

Following the William Tell comp 
tition, General Thatcher present! 
the much coveted Richard I. Boi 
Trophy to the top three fighter inta 
ceptor squadrons at an awards ced 
mony on Oct. 14. Maj. McCrory a 
cepted for the 146th FISq. AnotH 
military trophy, the Royal CanadiJ 
Air Force Traveling Trophy also wd 
to the Air National Guard unit fl 
accruing the highest number of poifl| 
of all 14 competitors. 

Industrial representatives whoi 
products are used by the ADC, pn 
sented specfal awards to the tc 
squadrons and individuals. In thd 
events also, the Air GuardsnM 
proved their capability, taking a fis 
place award in every event in whid 
they participated. The awards thd 
won were: RCA's C. D. Vincent Tn 
phy to the radar control team; Gel 
eral Dynamic's Convair Trophy fl 
first place in the F-102 categori 
three trophies from the Hughes Ai 
craft Corp. for firing, weapons loal 
ing and winning the F-102 categoi 
event; and, individual awards fro: 
the Ryan Aircraft Corp. for scoriij 
direct hits on the Firebee drone taj 
gets. Major McCrory made two pa 
feet kills, and Capt. A. E. Mead, aM 
of the 146th FISq., got one. 

For the first time, this year's A 
National Guard team was made \\ 
completely of Air Guardsmen, 
included a ground force of weapoi 
controllers and control techniciai 
from the 130th Air Control ar 
Warning Sq., Salt Lake City, Utal 
the 138th AC&WSq., Denver, Cold 
and the 140th AC&WSq., Punta I 
linas, Puerto Rico. The air controlled 
received special training at active ^j 
Force installations to become cui 
rent in the equipment they use 
during the contest, since it is not ord 
narily assigned to ANG installation 

Team members were: Maj. G. W 



12 



lots and ground crew of 
FISq. — winners oj Air 

se Command's William Tell 
tition — are congratulated 

llegheny County 

Court Judge John Brosky 

s hand oj 146th commander, 

McCrory. (2) Targets for Air 

Vs sharpshooters were 
Firebee drones, launched 

the ground (above) and 

the air (see cover). 






Crory, team captain, Maj. R. Magill 
and Capts. S. Lozowski, E. Mead and 
R. Bailey, forming the aircrew. GO 
personnel were: Capts. E. Morrisey 
and G. Hunt; MSgts. C. Ammon and 
O. Eskelson, and TSgt. J. Eastwood. 
Ground Support personnel were: 
Majs. L. Duke and R. Prave; CMSgt. 
C. Halliwell; SMSgt. W. Miller; 
MSgts. E. Hrvoich, S. Segal, T. Sig- 
ler, M. Sovich, J. Violante, F. Volk 
and J. Young; TSgts. J. Alimena, W. 
Bayton, E. Brown, J. Buckshaw, V. 
Fox, W. Gillie, D. Machesney, L. 
Rago, M. Richards, G. Rimmel and 
R. Stein; and SSgts. G. Aikens, M. 
Halahan, D. Kasbee, C. Macher, J. 





Michalowski, R. O'Connell, H. Sny- 
der and D. Voigt. 

Collecting trophies and displaying 
top grade professionalism is nothing 
new to the members of Air National 
Guard's 146th FISq., and the Air 
Defense Command considers them 
and their fellow Guard fighter squad- 
rons as full-fledged members of Amer- 
ica's air defense team. 

The Air Defense Command pro- 
vides the nation with an aerospace 
defense force which is geared to re- 
act instantly and effectively to any 
threat against the North American 
continent. The defensive might of 
ADC is based, to a large extent, on 
the professionalism of its 62 fighter 
interceptor squadrons, 25 of which 
are units of the Air National Guard. 

More than one-third of ADC's jet 
fighter aircraft are piloted by Air 
Guardsmen, and the air defense order 
of battle allows for no distinction be- 
tween Reserve or Regular. The recent 
performance record of the 146th 



FISq,. during the William Tell meet, 
adequately attests to the professional- 
ism of these citizen/airmen. 

Blending of the Air Guard and the 
Air Defense Command began for the 
146th long before ADC took over the 
responsibility for inspection and su- 
pervision of training in 1960. When 
CONAC had this responsibility, the 
146th carried an M-Day Assignment 
to ADC. In November 1960, Major 
McCrory's unit retired its F-86L air- 
craft in favor of the supersonic F- 
102 A Delta Daggers. It became one 
of the first half-dozen Air National 
Guard units to crack the Century 
Series barrier. 

To break into the century fold, the 
146th Fighter Squadron faced a na- 
tionwide competition among Air 
Guard squadrons ... all eager to be 
tapped for the new weapon systems. 
Biggest hurdle it had to surmount was 
the operational readiness inspection 
conducted by ADC. 

"You would have thought that we 
were 100% full-timers, the way en- 
thusiasm was generated all up and 
down the line by this challenge," Maj. 
McCrory recalls. "We wanted those 
planes . . . and we grabbed 'em." 

"Today, the F- 102 As perform 
morale service, too. Everyone knows 
that they're a hot ship, from the air- 
man who checks the tire pressure 
and the sergeant who fills out the pa- 
per work, to the civilian in the street 
who looks up to those Daggers." 

Maj. Gen. Benjamin J. Webster, 
chief of staff, ADC, phrased it an- 
other way, he called the ANG units 
an integral part of the command in- 
ventory which combines with the 
active duty units to become one first- 
string aerospace defense force. "ADC 
and its ANG units, together, are pro- 
viding a significant and highly im- 
portant element of this nation's de- 
terrent posture," he said. 

Should deterrence fail, the ability 
to integrate ANG units such as Major 
McCrory's 146th Fighter Interceptor 
Squadron into the active structure 
would add considerably to the na- 
tion's defensive capability. An order 
to scramble, from ADC's SAGE Unit 
at Syracuse, N. Y., could place him, 
his men, and equipment costing mil- 
lions into immediate action. 

"You always think of why you're 
here when you pull alert," Major 
McCrory admits. "You can't help it. 
But with a good crew behind you, 
you're confident, ready for anything 
ADC wings your way. Our job's be- 
ing out there, set to go. Trophies are 
nice, but you don't win battles with 
them. Professionalism counts." 



13 






vj ivil Air Patrol leaders attending 
the annual meeting of the National 
Board in Houston, Texas, October 
11, were given a ringing reaffirma- 
tion of USAF support of CAP. 

Air Force Secretary Eugene M. 
Zuckert and Chief of Staff Curtis E. 
LeMay both sent messages to the 
National Board strongly reasserting 
Air Force support and interest. 

Mr. Zuckert's message, delivered 
by Maj. Gen. Albert T. Wilson Jr., 
vice-commander of CONAC, recalled 
a recent briefing on CAP, presented 
to the secretary and chief of staff by 
Col. Paul C. Ashworth, USAF-CAP 
national commander in August, and 
said he was so impressed with CAP's 
accomplishments that he has asked 
his staff to explore ways of further 
expanding USAF-CAP relationships. 

General LeMay's message, in the 
form of a letter to Col. Paul W. 
Turner, CAP National Board chair- 
man, included an 8-point statement of 
USAF policy on CAP. The Air Force 
chief said the statement "reaffirms Air 
Force support and sponsorship of the 
CAP and provides a sound basis for 
continued cooperation." 

The 8-points made by the state- 
ment are: (1) AF-CAP relationship 
will continue as it now exists. (2) 
In its position of a civilian auxiliary 
of the Air Force, CAP constitutes an 
organization of real value to the Air 
Force and the nation. (3) The re- 
lationship between USAF and CAP 
is an incentive to members of both 
who work together to promote good 
citizenship, as well as, an appreciation 
and understanding of aerospace 
power. (4) This relationship should 
be an inspiration to dedicated CAP 
members in furtherance of the ideals 
for which CAP was founded. (5) 
USAF policy fullv recognizes and 
will continue to support the senior 
activities of CAP, such as search 
and rescue and communications, and 
activities in civil defense and disaster 
operations. However, USAF con- 
siders one of the most important 
missions of CAP its air education for 
the public and the motivation of 
youth to a career in aviation. (6) In 
keeping with the intent of Congress, 
appropriated funds will not be util- 
ized to procure for CAP, Inc. sup- 
plies, equipment or material not avail- 
able from stocks which are excess to 



Civil Air Patro 



% 





i 



} 



CAP Cadets Ira Guy (1) and Robert Palm were two of 47 Cadets to c 
Air Force's 40-hour Space Age Orientation course at Chanute A 
Cadets saw fueling, countdown and firing procedure of AF missile 



ompl 
FB, 

systet 



the requirements of the Departments 
of the Armv, Navy and Air Force. 
(7) The USAF will accept the serv- 
ices of CAP in carrying out its non- 
combatant responsibilities. The Air 
Force considers that CAP capabilities 
can be ot greatest value to the nation 
during domestic emergencies through 
cooperation with local governmental 
agencies. (8) Headquarters, CAP- 
USAF, will assure the proper instruc- 
tions of all Air Force staff and liaison 
officers on duty with CAP of their 
responsibilities to the Air Force in 
the performance of their duties with 
the civilian auxiliary. 

The CAP leaders also heard a call 
for closer cooperation between the 
Air Force Reservists and Civil Air 
Patrol from Gen. Wilson who was 
principal speaker at the Board's 
luncheon meeting. 

Gen. Wilson promised CONAC's 
full support in expanding CAP-Re- 
servists cooperation. 

The Board unanimously reelected 
Col. Turner as its national chairman 
for 1964. 



R, 



.ESULTS OF A MASSIVE test- 
exercise conducted by Federal Avia- 
tion Agency's Eastern Region Sep- 
tember 21-22 are expected to pin- 
point the extensive role which Civil 
Air Patrol aircraft, ground vehicles, 
communications and personnel will 
occupy in national survival plans. 

The two-day exercise, called Sur- 
vival East, simulated a national e- 
mergency situation following a hypo- 
thetical nuclear attack. 

The test exercise was set up by 
FAA to assess the importance of 
small non-military aircraft as a vital 
resource in support of military and 
civilian survival and recovery. 
Flying emergency medical supplies 



from established stockpile areas 
the disaster stricken sites, flying ae 
radiation surveys, and transpor 
radiological detection equipment 
Civil Defense units in the stric 
areas were three of the specific C 
capabilities to be probed. 

During the play of the exerd 
FAA's Eastern Region headquar 
was required to disperse its facill 
and its personnel to relocation si 
mobilize and control an air flee' 
provide the necessary airlift, and 
tablish and maintain commun 
tions between participating eleme 

Oscar Bakke, FAA Eastern 
gion director, who supervised the 
ercise, indicated that he looked 
CAP to play a significant role. 

CAP responded to this challe 
with 1 6 CAP wings, encompas 
within FAA's Eastern Region, j 
ticipating. Collectively, the C 
wings readied some 661 small 
craft, 926 ground vehicles and n T 
erous communication facilities. 

Umpires and observers who wa 
ed the play of the exercise unoffici 
reported that CAP, with its light 
craft, vehicles and communicat: 
net, supplied 85 to 90 per ceni 
the resources which FAA Eas 
Region needed to effect its dispel 

CAP wings which participatec 
the exercise included: Connecti 
Maine, Massachusetts, New Ha 
shire, New Jersey, New York, Pf 
sylvania, Rhode Island, Verm 
Delaware, Maryland, District of 
lumbia, Virginia, West Virginia, ¥ 
tucky and Ohio. 

Also participating in the exer 
were the Office of Civil Defense ' 
state directors of Civil Defense in 
test area: Regional Offices of Er 
gency Planning; the U. S. Wea 
Bureau; the Air Force Reserve; 
Aeronautics Board; and the Flj 
Physicians Association. 



14 



"We must never negotiate from fear, but ice should never fear to negotiate." Such a 
policy depends on strength and, therefore, we must continue to maintain and increase our mili- 
tary strength and keep our powder dry. Robert S. McNamara / Secretary of Defense 



Air Force Point 01 View 



L HE AIR FORCE CHIEF OF STAFF, General Cur- 
; E. LeMay, expressed the following views recently on 
to important military problems of our day: 
On Counterforce. "Placing emphasis on a counter- 
rce posture has led to U. S. strategic forces in being 
liich possess a war-winning capability to destroy an 
lemy's military forces and his means to wage war. It 
nds credibility and authority to all actions, ranging 
ward from a show-of-force, which are taken to deter 
defeat major aggression. It enables us to employ our 
rces selectively in response to conflict at any level. 
tie type of force and the amount of force we apply 
ust be regulated to convince an aggressor that con- 
lued provocation would bring consequences that are 
lacceptable to him." 

On Mixed Force. "The Air Force is making a con- 
:rted effort to maintain a mixed force of manned air- 
aft, and missiles and, for the longer term, vehicles 
at could operate in space. The Secretary of Defense 
lares our view of this mixed force concept. He has 
rected that we continue our studies of follow-on 
anned, strategic vehicles that can counter threats and 
irvive in the varied plateaus of aerospace operations, 
hese manned systems will continue to give us a flex- 
'le military capability. They will be able to achieve 
gh destructive effectiveness against hard targets. Their 
ristence will require an aggressor to expend vast re- 
mrces in defense measures. Finally, manned systems 
ill give us vehicles which can be adapted to change 
id thereby retain their effectiveness regardless of tech- 
ical advances by the enemy." 

ft ft ft 

JENERAL POWER ON "OVERKILL." Speaking 

I Commander-in-Chief of Strategic Air Command and 
irector of the Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff, 
en. Thomas S. Power gave his views on "overkill" 
> a Senate Subcommittee in August: 

"If you look at the programmed weapons; that is, if 
du look at the weapons I have in the present war 
Ian, you would say we are overkilling. But if you 
>ok at the weapons that I think will survive and ar- 
ve, then you will change your opinion. . . . 

"Not every bomb is going to arrive at the target. 
lany of them will be destroyed on the ground before 
ley are launched. Many will be destroyed by enemy 
:tion. Some will be duds. But we have figured this 

II out mathematically for every sortie and every weap- 
n, and we have arrived at- a confidence factor. 

"You can have any confidence you want, but if you 
ant to be, say 90 percent sure that you will destroy 

very sensitive target, and if you have a 50 percent 
snfidence factor that a particular weapon will reach 



its target, then you will have to program somewhere in 
the neighborhood of six to seven weapons to hope to 
get one there, but there is still a 10 percent chance 
that none will get there. So it is a question of mathe- 
matics and how sure you want to be or how much 
you want to gamble. 

"We write a war plan so that, if we are told to go 
to war, these prime sensitive targets will be destroyed, 
and I have a high confidence factor. I have a 90 per- 
cent confidence factor because I have programmed 
many weapons and I have cross-targeted them, using 
different types of weapons from different areas to get 
a reliability factor that is acceptable. 

"Now if they all got there, yes, we would be over- 
bombing and overkilling. But again people forget that 
what we are really trying to do is to prevent war. We 
are trying to make this thing so sure that it will deter 
anyone." 



ft ft ft 



T 



HE CONTINUING DANGER of the Communist 
threat, emphasized by President Kennedy in his major 
address of July 26, must not be forgotten. Quotable ex- 
cerpts on this subect: 

"This treaty is not the millennium. It will not resolve 
all conflicts, or cause the Communists to forego their 
ambitions, or eliminate the dangers of war. It will not 
reduce our need for arms or allies or programs of as- 
sistance to others. But it is an important first step — a 
step toward peace — a step toward reason — a step away 
from war. . . . 

"Western policies have long been designed to per- 
suade the Soviet Union to renounce aggression, direct 
or indirect, so that their people and all people may live 
and let live in peace. The unlimited testing of new 
weapons of war cannot lead toward that end, but this 
treaty, if it can be followed by further progress, can 
clearly move in that direction. . . . 

"There is no cause for complacency. We have learned 
in times past that the spirit of one moment or place 
can be gone in the next. We have been disappointed 
more than once, and we have no illusions now that there 
are shortcuts on the road to peace. At many points 
around the globe the Communists are continuing their 
efforts to exploit weakness and poverty. Their concen- 
tration of nuclear and conventional arms must still be 
deterred." 



ft ft ft 



M 



ILITARY SPACE STATION. A significant move 
in the national effort to enable men to act usefully be- 
yond the atmosphere was the issuance by the Air Force 
of requests to industry sources for studies on an orbital 
space station. Objective of the studies is to define char- 
acteristics from which a space station could be designed 
to demonstrate and assess the utility for military pur- 
poses of man in space. 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 






OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR F 
POSTAGE AND FEES PAld 



USAF Recurring Publication 3dfl 
No. 30-H-9-63-ll7//,l 








Q Air Force Reserve's 635th Hospital, Mitchel AFB, N.m\ 
turned a woman's fashion show into a successful recruiting eff<M\ 
recently when 90 guests — all in the nursing profession — watched Air Force Reserve nurses model uniforms. Reml 
resenting the past, the long past, present and future are (l-r) Maj. Mary Fitzgerald, Revolutionary War perioM 
Miss Rochelle Kitt, a professional model, Spanish American War; 1st Lt. Ellen Ehresman, the current USjU\ 
nurse uniform, and Capt. Clara Chichester with tomorrow's possibility. Q Singing stars, Jimmy Wakely and the 1 
Andrews Sisters (l-r) Maxine, Patty and LaVerne, became honorary lieutenant colonels of the 8504th Air Form 
Reserve Recovery Gp., at the unit's exhibition booth during a recent State Fair at Albuquerque, N.M. Col. Alvin 
H. Thiele, Jr. (1), group commander, and Lt. Col. Leonard S. Hartman, made the presentation. Q Reserve airmen 
of the 640th USAF Hospital, Chicago, 111, receive professional medical training through a joint program with Chi- 
cago's St. Joseph Hospital, operated by the Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul. Discussing the program 
are: (l-r) Capt. Barbara Heeb; Sister Mary Vincent; Sister Mary Helen; Chaplain Donald Werr; Col. Samuel SpiMl 
640th commander; Maj. Genevieve Bielecki and Mrs. E. Edgewood, St. Joseph's Chief Nurse. Q Preparing forWft 
transatlantic medical evacuation flight from the Rhein-Main AB, Germany, to McGuire AFB, N.J., are 1st Ml 
Carol Murphy and SSgl. Charles Schaler, Air National Guard aeromedical specialists assigned to ANG's 103rd Aer<A\ 
med Evac Flight, USNAS Willow Grove, Pa. They spent their two weeks training tour assisting the Air ForMl 
in the return to the U.S. of gravely ill servicemen and dependents. ^v -^ 



•9-63-702-49J 






"3.740! 



DEC. '63 /JAN. '64 



the air reservist 

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE AIR RESERVE FORCES 








*> 











NAC IS FIFTEEN YEARS OLD I 




*L ^ 'f. 



the air reservist 

Vol. XV No. 10 Dec. '63/Jan. '64 

AIR NATIONAL GUARD 
AIR FORCE RESERVE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 

EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 

The Air Reservist Is an official publication 

of Hq USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, D.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq USAF. 



the air reservist 


V n 






r^ 




< 


r 


* ' ~r> 




'"V- % 



Thii month's cover highlights the Air 
Force Reserve's troop carrier mission 
on the occasion of CONAC's 15th an- 
niversary. Also, the natural starlight 
effect captures the spirit of the season 
and we consider it a symbolic note on 
which to extend "holiday greetings" 
to all members of the Air Reserve 
Forces and their families. 



Atomic Age Medical Reserve 



Scariiimg"^)Tj 



SATELLITED €*? 

MEDICAL C > 
UNIT ^ I 

SATELLITED 
MEDICAL 
MATERIEL t 



SATELLITED 

MEDICAL 

PERSONNEL 




ecember first marked the fifteenth 
anniversary of the Continental Air 
Command — fifteen years filled with 
problems and progress. There were 
problems of transition, organization 
and reorganization; changes of con- 
cept and mission; budgetary limita- 
tions, personnel and equipment short- 
ages, and the usual obstacles which 
accompany implementing new pro- 
grams and policies. But above all, 
they were years in which the Air 
Force Reserve raised its augmentation 
value to that of a force able to pro- 
vide immediate support. 

A firm example of the structural 
flexibility of the Air Force Reserve 
program came with the establishment 
of the Recovery concept. Advances 
in weapons technology provided the 
requirement for an internal plan for 
survival and the Air Force Reserve 
was given the mission. The "post 
M-Day" mobilization concept was 
altered to make way for one giving 
bona fide support — the Recovery pro- 
gram. Reservists across the country, 
some 17,000 in all, left Individual 
Training classrooms and enthusiastic- 
ally accepted a new and active mis- 
sion. With meagre funds, less equip- 
ment and a wealth of determination 
they transferred a concept into a 
practical and operational program, 
not only for survival of our fighting 
force during war but for the daily 
recovery of such aircraft as may re- 
quire their services. 

Other products which have evolved 
during the fifteen-year period of 
streamlining are numerous: Reservists 
with special civilian skills are apply- 



AIR BASE COMPLEX 

WITH 

MEDICAL FACILITY NUCLEUI 



ing them toward accomplishing US Ah 
objectives; Air Force's major air com I 
mands such as MATS, TAC and thf. 
AFCS have come to rely more heavihi 
upon Reserve professionalism; anM 
more important, the Air Force Re I 
serve's ability to respond to the need'f 
of the Nation within a matter of hourt 
proves them an integral segment M 
the "Total Force" structure. 

Our center spread article bylinaj 
by Lt. General Edward J. Timberlakej 
commander of Continental Air Com! 
mand, entitled "The Air Force Rel 
serve in Transition," the page 4 arj 
tide on "Retention and Recruiting' | 
and the page 12 treatment of "Thi[ 
Evolution of CONAC" are a purposed 
ful blend showing a major Air Com-j 
mand's goals, problems, results 11 
date, and prospects for the future \ 



J. he Air Force will organize 1«| 
new Air Force Reserve Medical Servj 
ice units starting early this year. ThCT 
will replace Air Force Reserve hefr 
pitals and Air Force Reserve casualt;| 
staging units. The reorganization m 
be phased over an 1 8-month period 
Other Reserve medical units, sucl 
as tactical hospitals and aeromedica 
evacuation units are not affected. I 
Phasing into the new organizationa 
structure is designed to hold displace 
ment of personnel to a minimum. Thtl 
personnel authorizations for th( 
Medical Service units range from 2t 
to 164 with intermediate sizes of W 
and 50 personnel. The total num 
ber of personnel involved — slight!; 
more than 7,100 — is virtually uot 



anged from that authorized for all 
e USAF hospitals and casualty 
iging units which are being replaced. 
The 148 units will be located at 
II Air Force bases, They will train 
existing USAF medical facilities, 
d their personnel will be author- 
id 48 inactive duty training periods 
well as 15 days active duty train- 
g annually. The major command 
ving jurisdiction over the active 
rce medical facility will be respon- 
se for supervision of training and 
spection of the Reserve units. 
The new units are designed for 
aximum functional flexibility. Be- 
use of their close affiliation with 
tive Air Force medical facilities, 
ey will be able to "fuse" with those 
:ilities to provide immediate aug- 
entation or expansion. They will 
ovide replacement capability if ac- 
'e force personnel are deployed to 
pport contingency operations. They 
11 participate jointly with the active 
edical facility in exercises and in 
inimizing local disasters. 
Their usefulness is not limited to 
nctions in relation to the host fa- 
ities. The flexibility of these new 
edical Service units will allow them 
operate independently or to con- 
lidate with other Medical Service 
lits to perform hospital or casualty 
iging functions. 

[Manning as well as functional use- 
Iness is expected to be enhanced 
the Medical Service Unit program, 
though some of the more than 
300 medical Reservists presently 
signed to affected units will have 
travel a few extra miles to reach 
eir training sites, the relocation of 
its will open participation to many 
Dre professional and technical per- 
nnel. By increasing the number of 
:ations, the Air Force is widening 
e manning potential. Creating a unit 
ucture at bases, where the only op- 
irtunity for training has been on an 
dividual basis, will give the Reserv- 



Jfapjy 

3 



ear 



ist a more interesting and directly 
productive means of participating in 
the Air Force Reserve program. 

A further advantage of the new 
structure is that it will foster a closer 
relationship and better understanding 
among the medical personnel of the 
Air Force Reserve and those of the 
active Air Force. This bond is expect- 
ed to bring additional dividends in 
retention of professional personnel 
for both active and Reserve compo- 
nents. More than 50 per cent of the 
active duty medical officer strength 
is comprised of physician-Reservists 
on two-year tours of active duty. The 
experience of working closely with 
both career military medical person- 
nel and Reservists whose roots are in 
the local community could be an im- 
portant factor in the future plans of 
the "two year" personnel. 

Training, also, will be greatly im- 
proved. The modern equipment of the 
active force facility will replace the 
often inadequate training resources of 
a purely Reserve medical organiza- 
tion. A larger base of experienced 
supervisors will insure the best pos- 
sible instruction and on-the-job-train- 
ing. The gaining command concept 
will provide the impetus for a progres- 
sive training program. This plus 
standardization of training methods 
and requirements by the Office of the 
Surgeon General, USAF, will assure 
the development of the desired level 
of operational capability. 



O everal Reserve promotion boards 
are scheduled to convene during the 
coming months. The first will meet on 
January 7, in Washington, D. C, and 
will select officers for permanent pro- 
motion to major. All active duty offi- 
cers including warrant officers hold- 
ing Reserve commissions, and all Air 
National Guard of the U. S. officers 
will be considered. Officers must have 
a promotion service date (PSD) of 
March 31, 1958, or earlier and a to- 
tal years service date (TYSD) of 
March 31, 1951 or earlier. 

A board also will convene at the 
Air Reserve Records Center, Denver, 
on February 3, to consider about 
400 Reserve officers for promotion to 
first lieutenant. Eligible officers must 
hold a PSD on or before December 
31, 1961 and be in an active status. 

On March 2, another board will 
convene at the Records Center to 
consider about 5,000 Reserve majors 
for promotion to lieutenant colonel. 
Eligibility requires a PSD of June 
30, 1958 or earlier and a TYSD of 
June 30, 1944 or earlier. 



l\ Massachusetts Air National 
Guard pilot, Captain Russell L. 
Schweickart, of the 102nd Tactical 
Fighter Group at Boston, was select- 
ed for astronaut training in the most 
recent screening of America's top 
aviators and scientists. 

At 28, Captain Schweickart is the 
youngest man in the National Aero- 
nautic and Space Administration's 
astronaut program. In addition, he 
holds the distinction of being the 
first astronaut selected directly from 
the Air Reserve Forces. Donald K. 
(Deke) Slayton, is a former Minne- 
sota Air Guardsman, but he entered 
the astronaut program while on active 
duty with the Air Force. And Major 
Bob Rushworth, who wears the 
astronaut wings for his X-15 flights, 
is a former Maine Air Guardsman. 

Captain Schweickart, in civilian 
life, was a scientist at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 

"Rusty," as the captain is known 
to fellow Air Guardsmen and close 
friends, was selected from among 725 
applicants. He was so determined to 
get into the program, that he sub- 
mitted two applications last summer 
— one through the Air Guard and 
one directly to NASA. 

He will report officially to Houston 
in February. Captain Schweickart is 
hopeful he'll get a chance at a flight 
on the two-man Gemini missions and 
be in the first expedition to land on 
the moon under the Apollo program. 

tee SCANNING page 6 




New astronaut Schweickart 



The Continental Air Command Air 
Force Reserve drill pay strength 
has reached an all-time high with a 
total of 54,150. This impressive fig- 
ure, tallied as of the end of November, 
represents an increase of 4,1 13 above 
the CONAC drill pay strength of 
January 1, 1963 and is 240 above 
the USAF programmed drill pay 
strength for the command as of No- 
vember 30. The previous drill pay 
peak was 53,504 on August 3 1 , 1962. 
CONAC officials attribute the in- 
crease to renewed efforts at all eche- 
lons of command. 

In a letter to Reserve region com- 
manders, Major General Albert T. 
Wilson, Jr., CONAC vice command- 
er, stated, "This could not have been 
achieved without the constant atten- 
tion to the manning problem by com- 
manders at each echelon." 

In the same letter, however, he 
cautioned that troop carrier, air res- 
cue, mobile comunications, censor- 
ship, and postal units are behind 
what Hq., USAF expected CONAC 
to have in the airman program and 
cited the need for emphasis in re- 
lation to these units. 

Although the November figure rep- 
resents the tops in drill pay strength 
for CONAC in its 1 5 years of opera- 
tion, Colonel Burton H. Rowden, 
CONAC deputy chief of staff for 
Personnel, also warned against too 
much optimism, stating that the figure 
is still below the ceiling of 55,650. 
He urges that all units pursue that 
objective during 1964 with increased 
effort. There is still much work to 
be done in airman retention and re- 
cruiting and various units are still 
below the programmed strength. Air- 
man drill pay strength is 366 under 
the USAF programmed strength as of 
November 30. He said that recruit- 
ing efforts produce large numbers of 
people but that losses also are great 
and pointed out that the Reserve 
unit program had lost a total of 13,- 
647 people since January 1963. 

The personnel chief named reten- 
tion as a problem and added the fol- 
lowing observation: "Units which 
practice effective personnel manage- 
ment have the fewest losses." As for 
recruiting, he counseled, the first steps 
are to identify prospective members, 
insure that they are aware of the 
Reserve Program and stimulate their 
interest toward affiliation. He stressed 
the need for obtaining a professional 
recruiting force and getting it to- 
gether with the prospect and the 
necessity of obtaining strong support 
Irom the public. 

CONAC officials pronounce the 
establishment of a Retention and Re- 



CONAC' 5 

Retention/ Recruiting 

Efforts 

Begin to Pay Off! 




RETENTION of manpower is the basic problem. 



cruiting Coordinator Program as one 
of the most effective steps taken in 
the past year. Under this program, 
a highly trained non-commissioned 
officer within each of the 16 sectors 
has the sole duty of establishing liai- 
son with active duty separation cen- 
ters, USAF Recruiting Service of- 
fices, and Reserve units within his 
sector. He makes his talent avail- 
able to the Reserve unit commander 
and advises him of the latest reten- 
tion and recruiting techniques. He 
also provides the unit commander 



with an evaluation of the unit recruit- 
ing and retention efforts. 

The Retention and Recruiting Co- 
ordinators allow Hq., CONAC. 
through the sector and region com- 
manders, an on-the-spot evaluation 
of the effectiveness of CONACs 
manning programs. 

At the USAF Recruiting Service 
Office, the coordinator cooperates 
with that agency and assures mutual 
support. An individual desiring t(J 
enlist in the Regular Air Force per- 
haps cannot be accepted due 1 




and improve unit effectiveness. 

Turning from retention to recruit- 
ing, Colonel Rowden pointed to the 
use of printed material, radio and 
television to reach individual pros- 
pects and inform them of the benefits 
of Reserve affiliation. He cited re- 
cruiting seminars held with repre- 
sentatives from the information of- 
fices, personnel offices and Reserve 
units to develop ideas for better moti- 
vation material, and the establish- 
ment of a two-week Reserve Re- 
cruiters Course among the many new 
accomplishments of the past year. 

The CON AC Office of Information 
carried on a wide variety of projects 
during 1963 in support of recruiting 
and retention. 

In the final analysis, the "grass 
roots" effort is the one which counts. 
Higher headquarters can make the 
tools available and give assistance 
and ideas, but the unit commanders 
and individual Reservists have the 
final word on the success or failure 
of the retention and recruiting effort. 



THE REMEDY 







GAIN 



COMMAND SUPPORT 



Direction of efforts are indicated by arrows. 



a limitation but can be persuaded 
)in a Reserve unit. Likewise, a 
:rve unit is often able to assist 
ocal recruiter in filling his quota 
he active establishment. 
tie coordinator is a source of in- 
lation at the active duty separa- 
center on the entire Air Force 
rve Program. 

hile these coordinators are doing 
e job in the manning area, Colo- 
Rowden emphasized that they 
Dnly a part of the overall effort. 
wited recognition as one of the 



important aspects of the program 
and pointed out that CONAC has 
encouraged unit vacancy promotions 
and provided special quotas for the 
promotion of outstanding airmen. 
Among~ other ' CONAC efforts he 
listed: liberalizing provisions for 
awarding higher skill levels; obtain- 
ing Hq., USAF approval (last year) 
to provide ten percent of the quota 
for commissions to outstanding air- 
men for nonprior service men; and 
emphasizing the use of OJT to stimu- 
late interest in unit training programs 



RECRUITING LEADERS 

"Grass roots" efforts are reflected 
in the increasing Unit Manning Docu- 
ment figures reported monthly by 
CONAC units. The following units 
lead all other CONAC units in officer 
and airman strength (as of November 
30, 1963) and are examples of what 
can be achieved by a persistent inter- 
nal recruiting program: 

• 918th Troop Carrier Group, Dob- 
bins AFB, Ga., Officer (93.3%); 
Airman (95.9%). 

• 302nd Air Rescue Squadron, Luke 
AFB, Ariz., Officer (100%); Air- 
man (88.9%). 

• 909th Troop Carrier Group, An- 
drews AFB, Md., Officer (92.4% ); 
Airman (95.4%). 

• 303rd Air Rescue Squadron, 
March AFB, Calif., Officer 
(96.2%); Airman (87.8%). 

• 304th Air Rescue Squadron, Port- 
land IAP, Ore., Officer (92.3%); 
Airman (88.9%). 

• 924th Troop Carrier Group, 
Ellington AFB, Tex., Officer 
(90.1%); Airman (87.5%). 

f 901st Troop Carrier Group, L. G. 
Hanscom Field, Mass., Officer 
(90.1%); Airman (86.3%). 

• 923rd Troop Carrier Group, Cars- 
well AFB, Tex., Officer (100.8%); 
Airman (74.5%). 

• 928th Troop Carrier Group, Chi- 
cago, 111., Officer (90%); Airman 
(77.5%). 




Sponsored by Reservist-lawyers, George Washington University aw students 
learn courts-martial procedures at mock trial, (l-r) Law student Jerome Flan- 
agan SSgt (A2c) William Whelan Jr., and Col. (Capt.) Clifford A.Dougherty. 



U 



nder Secretary of the Air Force 
Brockway McMillan has stated that 
the Air Staff will continue its efforts 
to align as many Air Reserve Forces 
units as possible in support of its 
broad Survival, Recovery and Re- 
constitution plan (SRR). 

The directive resulted from a rec- 
ommendation from the 37th meeting 
of the Air Reserve Forces Policy 
Committee, approved by the Under 
Secretary of the Air Force, which ad- 
vocated that the Air Force Reserve 
Recovery Program be expanded to 
provide increased Ready Reserve aug- 
mentation within the SRR plan. 

Expressing great concern on the 
growing deficiency in pilot manning 
in the Air Reserve Forces, the 
Committee also recommended that 
the Air Force pilot training program 
be enlarged to include an allotment 
of pilot training spaces for the Air 
Force Reserve. This recommenda- 
tion was approved for planning pur- 
poses and the Air Staff has been asked 
to submit to the Secretary of the Air 
Force an analysis of costs, man- 
power and facilities required for its 
implementation. 

Secretarial approval was also given 
on the Committee request for a special 
meeting in January 1964 to consider 
the feasibility of establishing a single 
Air Reserve Force. The dates for this 
executive session of the Air Reserve 
Forces Policy Committee will be Jan- 
uary 15, 16 and 17. 

The Committee opposed passage 



of H.R. 8133 which would prohibit 
the Secretary of the Air Force from 
requiring membership in the Air 
Force Reserve as a condition of em- 
ployment in any civilian position in 
the Department of the Air Force. 
The committee felt passage of this 
bill would kill the Air Reserve Tech- 
nician Program. Under Secretary 
McMillan approved the Committee's 
recommendation. 

The Policy Committee also gave 
their support to H.R. 2504 which 
would provide retirement benefits for 
ANG technicians. The Secretary's 
office then interposed no objection 
to this proposed legislation. 



T 



wo regular Air Force airmen 
serving with the Air Reserve Forces 
were honored by the Reserve Officers 
Association at its Fall Air Affairs 
Committee meeting held at Kansas 
City, Mo., Nov. 1-2. 

The two airmen were Technical 
Sergeant Junior B. Best from the Of-" 
fice of the Assistant Chief of Staff 
for Reserve Forces, and Staff Ser- 
geant Don E. Savage of the Office of 
the Executive Secretary of the Air 
Reserve Forces Policy Committee. It 
is the first time that airmen have been 
so honored by the organization. 

The two were honored during a 
luncheon held at Riehards-Gebaur 
AFB, at which Mr. John A. Lang, 
Jr., deputy lor Reserve and ROTC 
Affairs, was the guest speaker. 



XVescrvist-lawyers assisted by stw 
dents of the George Washington Uni- 
versity Law School conducted a Moo 
General Court-Martial in Washingi 
ton, D.C., on December 10. 

The proceedings were designed tt 
provide trial practice for students, i 
demonstration of court-martial pro: 
cedures and a training exercise fo| 
Reserve officers assigned to the USAI 
Judge Advocate General's office a 
Boiling AFB. 

Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Ryan 
Jr., a judge of one of the Distric 
of Columbia's Domestic Relation 
courts, served as law officer durim 
the trial. Court members and thj 
law officer were Reserve officer 
(MOARS) assigned to the Militar 
Justice Divisions of the Office of tH 
Judge Advocate General. Couns« 
was composed of law students fror 
the University's Trial Practice course 
A guest panel of general ofhcei 
were on hand to explain procedure 
and answer questions from the aud 
ence during closed sessions of th 
court. Serving on this panel wen 
Maj. Gen. Albert M. Kuhfeld, USA 
Judge Advocate General; Brig. Gei 
Robert W. Manss, assistant, USA 
JAG; and two Reservists, Brig. Gei 
Richard C. Hagan, and Brig. Gei 
Thomas H. King, who hold mobilizi 
tion assignments as assistants to Gei 
eral Kuhfeld. 



A 



Reserve Roles and Resourc 
Study was conducted last month by 
board of general officers in an effc 
to insure the most productive use 
the Air Reserve Forces in support 
the Air Force mission. Major Ge 
eral Curtis R. Low, assistant chief 
staff for Reserve Forces, served 
chairman of the nine-member groi 
which included two general office 
from the Air National Guard, I 
representatives of the Air Force R 
serve, and one each from the offic 
of the Deputy Chiefs of Staff for P< 
sonnel, Plans and Operations, Pr 
grams and Requirements, and S\ 
terns and Logistics. 

The primary objectives of the stu 
were to identify the problem are 
within the Reserve components, I 
view their present and future requi 
ments, and determine the resoun 
necessary to meet those requireme 
for the next ten years or the fores* 
able future. The major air commar 
were asked to undertake a full-sc 
study of the ways in which the I 
Reserve Forces can make the great 
contribution to their command rrj 
sions. Commands and air staff ago 



s provided the study group with a 
at deal of background information 
i recommendations on which to 
;e their deliberations. General Joe 

Kelly, Military Air Transport 
vice commander, asked the MATS 
serve Forces Policy Council to 
wene a special meeting to add their 
ws, and Tactical Air Command 
3 called upon its key Reserve 
rces advisors for recommendations, 
rhe findings of the study group are 

expected to be announced until 
y have been presented to the Air 
serve Forces Policy Committee 
1 Secretary Zuckert after going 
ough the normal process of review. 
'n addition to General Low, other 

USAF members of the study 
up were: Maj. Gen. James C. Mc- 
tee, Div. Personnel Training and 
ucation, Brig. Gen. Paul Barton, 
it. for Logistics Planning, Brig. 
■ Richard A. Yudkin, Dep. Dir. 
Plans for Policy and Brig. Gen. 
lothy F. O'Keefe, Dep. Dir. Op- 
tional Requirements. Air Reserve 
ces members were Maj. Gen. 
irles H. DuBois, and Brig. Gen. 
jrge R. Doster, both ANG, and 
g. Gen. James L. Riley, Com- 
nder 4th AF Reserve Region, and 
e. Gen. Nicholas Allen, Air Force 
ierve. 



L ajor air commands have been 
I to review administrative practices 
d in handling annual short tours 
Reservists and make sure that the 
rs including travel time add up to 
ctly 15 days. 

^ recent comptroller general re- 
t criticized additional days of pay 
travel time which should have 
ti included in the short tour. The 
3rt said some Reservists were re- 
"ed to sign in on the afternoon of 
-duty preceding the first day of 
ve duty. Others weren't released 
:he last day of the training period, 
h instances required the Air Force 
»ay an extra day's pay. 
"he comptroller general was also 
ical of cases where no travel was 
lally performed in reporting or 
ig released from active duty tours. 
Leservists residing in the local area 
ild perform travel on the first day 
he tour but prior to normal work- 
hours. Those who live outside 
local area should be given a re- 
:ing hour later in the day to allow 
n to also perform travel on the 
day of the tour. Reservists should 
eleased from duty on the last day 
■aining early enough to allow them 
eturn home on the same day. 



1 he following bills (all favorable to 
members of the Reserve Forces) are 
currently before the 88th Congress 
awaiting action or have been pro- 
posed by the Air Force or DOD. 

H.R. 2500. A bill to equalize the 
treatment of Reserves and Regulars 
in the payment of per diem by: ( 1 ) 
Amending the Career Compensa- 
tion Act so that the term "per- 
manent station" may also include the 
home of a member. (2) Permit the 
payment of per diem to Reservists 
and National Guardsmen under cir- 
cumstances in which per diem is pay- 
able to active duty personnel, such 
as when participating in airlift mis- 
sions for MATS and TAC, serving 
at fire-power demonstrations or on 
air rescue missions, attending service 
schools or while serving on boards 
away from home, and when a mem- 
ber of an advance party making ar- 
rangements for a unit's annual train- 
ing encampment. STATUS: A favor- 
able report went to the Bureau of 
the Budget on September 4, 1963, 
but it is unlikely that BOB will reply 
much before early 1964. 

H.R. 2505. Better known as the 
"portal to portal" coverage bill, it 
would amend titles 10 and 32 of the 
U. S. Code relative to members of 
the Reserve Forces who become dis- 
abled from injury or disease. It would 
( 1 ) grant Reservists who contract or 
aggravate a disease in line of duty 
while proceeding directly to or from, 
or performing inactive duty training 



or active duty for 30 days or less, the 
same hospital and medical care, pay 
and allowances, and other benefits as 
are now provided Reservists while on 
duty for ordered periods of over 30 
days. (2) grant the same entitlement 
of benefits to Reservists injured in 
line of duty while proceeding directly 
to or from inactive duty training or 
active duty as they would receive 
were the injury incurred during the 
scheduled period of training or duty. 
STATUS: Department of Defense has 
objected to the disease clause, but 
favors the injury clause. This bill was 
submitted to the Bureau of the Budget 
for clearance on August 8, 1963 
Reply not expected before early 1 964. 

H.R. 4271. A bill to amend and 
clarify the reemployment provisions 
of the Universal Military Training 
and Service Act. Its purposes are: 
( 1 ) to assure that Reservists are not 
denied employment or other advan- 
tages of employment because of a 
current or future obligation to serve 
in the Armed Forces. (2) To clarify 
the status of probationary employ- 
ment, and (3) prevent any person 
from being denied employment be- 
cause of any obligation for future ac- 
tive or inactive military service or 
training in the Armed Forces or a 
Reserve component thereof. STA- 
TUS: This bill is being sponsored by 
the Dept. of Labor and supported by 
DOD. It is anticipated the House 
Armed Services Committee will hold 
a hearing on it early in 1964. 

see SCANNING page 10 




Recruiting, instruction and emergency jumps are provided by this ANG sky- 
diving team of the J 49th Ftr. Gp., Kelly AFB, Tex. (l-r) TSgt A . Stewart, A 1C 
S. Arnold, Capt. M. Thompson, Army Sp/5 J. Mendez and SSgt J. Settles. 



Since it came into being in 1948, 
Continental Air Command has 
had prime responsibility for command 
and administration of the Air Force 
Reserve. The very establishment of the 
command was designed to strengthen 
the Air Force Reserve components. 
As the historical piece featured on 
page 1 2 points out, CONAC was cre- 
ated as a result of an Executive Order 
by President Truman. In a covering 
letter, the President emphasized that 
our traditional pattern of national de- 
fense has been to rely on organized 
reserves to supplement the regular 
armed forces. 

Continental Air Command was ul- 
timately charged with responsibility 
for "the development and institution 
of training programs which will hold 
the interests of Reservists at all levels 
and will maintain and improve the 
military skills which they have hither- 
to acquired by active service in the 
Armed Forces of the United States." 
The intervening years have been 
characterized by many changes in the 
Air Force Reserve Program. These 
changes were for the most part pro- 
cedural, affecting administration, su- 
pervision, and training. The central 
concept of utilizing the Air Force 
Reserve components as a mobilization 
base remained, however. 

In 1961, in Berlin, this traditional 



concept went by the board. For the 
first time in our history, Reserves 
were called upon to deter war. A few 
short months thereafter, in the Cuban 
Crisis of 1962, units of the Air Force 
Reserve were again ordered to active 
duty to play their role in the deterrent 
power of the nation. 

Together, the Berlin and Cuban 
Crises brought into play a dynamic 
change in concept. This change, in- 
dorsed by our government leaders 
and by the Air Force, means that Air 
Reservists are today an integral part 
of our deterrent force and will con- 
tinue to be so utilized into the indefi- 
nite future. Hence, the Air Force Re- 
serve is in a period of transition which 
will result in new roles and missions 
calculated to meet the pressures and 
challenges of our time. 

I believe that the departure from 
tradition arose from a basic change 
in national policy. While deterrence 
of war has long been our objective, 
the policy of "massive retaliation" — 
or as some call it, "city-busting" — has 
given way to the more classic concept 
of "counterforce," the destruction of 
an enemy's fighting capabilities. 
Counterforce strategy has brought 
with it an inevitable increase in mis- 
sion coverage. 

Economically, however, our nation, 
with budgets at the straining point, 



cannot tolerate the manpower ad 
tions to active duty forces requil 
by the increase in mission covera 
Reserve forces must be utilized 
augment active forces wherever if 
practicable to do so. Only in that w 
can we have the total force needed 
satisfy the total defense demand, 
this extent, our Reserves are still i 
filling their tradition. 

A word about defense requi 
ments, which themselves have 
panded enormously. The spectrum 
our defense responsibilities in th 
critical years of the Sixties and S 
enties ranges from counter-im 
gency to limited war to general 
to the untold possibilities of man 
space. In between there are m 
variables; and military strategists h 
given to them many terms, sc 
quite bizarre. "Spasm war," "Ell 
policies," "Broken-back war," "F 
ward strategy" — these are just a t 
Whatever the names, one fact is ck 
Reserves — especially the units 
individuals of the Air Force Rese 
— must be ready to augment 
active Air Force in deterring or fij 
ing any type of conflict. 

This will take a new view by al 
us. Herman Kahn, the eminent r 
tary analyst and writer, whose b 
"On Thermonuclear War" has ] 
voked more study and comment t 




Continuous training by Reservists in the Recovery program affords USAF an effective and t 



■ other of its kind in recent years, 
observed that we must be pre- 
ed to "accept the notion that the 
•Id as we know it is passing from 
stage of history." 
f this be so, and it can hardly be 
ibted, how can the Air Force help 
assure our national survival in the 
just ahead. From a practical and 
5onable standpoint, it must main- 
i a high measure of deterrent pow- 
:hrough a mix of active duty and 
serve strength. This, in turn, can be 
ieved only through realistic, hard- 
ded planning and programming, 
ti Reserve Force requirements 
ed on a thorough understanding 
capabilities. While that goal may 
m distant, I believe we are gradu- 
getting there. 

rhe principal ingredient of this 
; will be effective management. By 
t I do not refer merely to wise 
icy guidance and utilization of the 
;erve by the active Air Force. I 
an capable management on the 
t of Reservists themselves — a re- 
nsibility authorized by the Re- 
:d Management Plan of 1960. Im- 
vement must be gained all along 
line — in training, in recall speed, 
general combat capability. Tooth- 
less than a wide-out effort by 
NAC, other major commands, and 
iervists will be required. 




itation force . . . 



Moreover, this improvement must 
be attained under austere circum- 
stances. Few people seem to realize 
that efficient management has been 
the watchword of the Air Force since 
its establishment on September 18, 
1947. If anything, the popular image 
is quite the reverse. Since the Air 
Force has consistently been allotted 
a major share of the Defense budget, 
people tend to think of it as "the fat 
boy with the candy." Nothing could 
be less accurate. The forgotten factor 
in the situation is the fantastic cost 
of aerospace weapon systems and the 
research which makes them possible. 
Since this will not diminish and the 
budget will not increase, in all proba- 
bility, the entire Air Force, active and 
Reserve, faces even greater austerity 
than ever. 

Thus far, I have been referring to 
units and individuals of the Ready 
Reserve, for it is they whom the 
President alone may recall in time of 
emergency. But I do not consider for 
a moment that Standby or Retired 
Reservists are without their place in 
the Air Force scheme of things. An 
indication to the contrary was a recent 
regulation (September 3, 1963) on 
the Air Force Civil Defense Program 
which specifically calls for the utiliza- 
tion of Standby Reservists in the 
planning of civil defense. CONAC's 
overall responsibilities with respect 
to this program are on the increase. 

While I habitually stress the need 
for careful planning, I do not wish 
to imply that all our possible future 
requirements can safely be predicted. 
For one thing, we simply cannot know 
precisely what kind of war may at 
any time confront us. 

Brigadier General S. L. A. Mar- 
shall, USA (Retired), a military 
writer of long standing and a highly 
respected Army historian, had some 
interesting comments on this score in 
a recent article entitled "A Lesson 
For Strategists." Going back to World 
War I, still the mightiest mobilization 
of all time, he recalled these facts 
about the French Army. 

At mobilization time, France had 
some 4,000 artillery pieces. This was 
considered enough to clinch a victory. 
France had to build another 36,000 
for that one war. Twenty-five hun- 
dred machine guns were supposedly 
sufficient. The war took another 
300,000. The army took to the field 
with 2,000 telephones and 600 kilom- 
eters of cable. Before the war ended, 
350,000 field telephones had been 
used and the cable had stretched to 
two million kilometers. 

Turning to another aspect of pre- 




. . . Reserve Rescue teams also 
support USAF's global mission. 

paredness in "The Lesson of Korea," 
General Marshall stated the proposi- 
tion that the Korean Conflict 
strengthened the military posture of 
the United States and changed the 
design and implementation of our 
foreign policy more directly, more 
dramatically, than either of the two 
World Wars. 

"The war in Korea, and nothing 
else," he said, "made possible the 
right turn to a preparedness more 
nearly proportioned to the magnitude 
of the danger and the spread of the 
global problem. Nothing else would 
have broken the shell of American 
complacency which in 1945 hard- 
ened too soon after V-J Day. We had 
to go to war again less than five years 
later, and we had to stay a long time. 

"Of complacency, there is no end. 
We have it still in people, in govern- 
ment, in press. But what we've got is 
tip-toe readiness compared to what 
we had pre-Korea. Today's armed 
force is a mobile main body, not a 
housekeeping cadre. It has shortages 
(as always) but it also has readily 
extendable fighting power. That was 
well demonstrated in the Cuban crisis 
and the shock to the Soviets must 
have been tremendous." 

The final allusion to extendable 
fighting power brings me around to 
my starting point — the new deterrent 
role of the Air Force Reserve. How- 
ever unpredictable may be the ulti- 
mate manpower requirements of any 
war we may be involved in, I believe 
two things — firmly. First, that the 
Air Force will require for the indefi- 
nite future the backup of an efficient, 

see TRANSITION, page 10 



■ TRANSITION from page 9 

truly Ready Reserve, and second, 
that Reservists themselves must bear 
a heavy brunt of assuring such a 
Ready force. 

This being my belief, I am setting 
forth here some guidelines as I see 
them. 

An Air Force Reserve Plan must 
have the primary objective of ful- 
filling Air Force needs in war or 
emergency. The question is: How? 
What basic principles govern the suc- 
cess of a Reserve Plan? 

In 1953, the Johnson Board sug- 
gested these seven guides for any 
Reserve plan. I think they apply to- 
day as well as ten years ago. 

• It must be objective. It must 
fulfill a requirement for defense. 

• It must be wholeheartedly ac- 
cepted and supported. It must be an 
integral part of the U. S. Air Force 
at all echelons. 

• It must be within capabilities. 
The scope must be within the poten- 
tial Reserve manpower; and emphasis 
must be placed upon quality rather 
than quantity training. 

• It must be simple. The plan 
must be readily understandable. 

• It must be stable. Changes in 
the Reservists' responsibilities and op- 
portunities must remain as constant 
as the international situation permits. 

• It must be acceptable to Re- 
servists. It must encompass incentives 
to create a desire by Reservists to be 



a part thereof; it must conveniently 
enable the Reservists to participate. 

• It must have public acceptance 
and support. It must be acceptable to 
and appreciated by industry, civic 
organizations, and the general public 
as being vital to national security. 

Since assuming command of 
CONAC, 1 have arrived independent- 
ly at those very conclusions and have 
consistently stressed the need for 
more realistic programming. Recently, 
my thoughts have been occupied by 
one basic and extremely vital element 
of programming — the element which 
must come first. That is organization. 

Here are my thoughts as to what 
an effective Reserve command organ- 
ization should provide. There are 
eight basic ingredients: 

• An adequate span of control — 
not too thin nor restricted but one 
assuring selectivity and supervision; 

• A minimum number of layers 
of control between Headquarters 
CONAC and the Reservists; 

• A capability for meeting prob- 
able future requirements, notably 
USAF's SRR [Survival, Recovery and 
Reconstitution] Plan. 

• Focal points for all Reservists 
within reasonable geographic limits — 
realistic boundaries for subordinate 
echelons, geared to their supervisory 
capabilities; 

• A better posture to enhance 
recruiting; 

• A built-in capability to coordi- 



nate with local and community 
sources — a structure likely to increa 
prestige for the Air Force Rcser 
and promote closer identification 
the Reservist with his community, i 
eluding civilian, civic, and milita' 
organizations; 

• A capability for supporting ci 
defense and aligning with other A 
Force, Army, and Civil Air Pati 
units; and 

• A rallying point for Standby ; 
Retired Reservists as well as Re; 
and a means for stimulating part 
pation by Reservists not currently 
the program. 

So much for my ideas about pla 
ning and organization and some 
the things which need doing in t 
days ahead. On this, CONAC's 15! 
Anniversary, 1 think the Air Fori 
Reserve can look back with grej 
pride on its many contributions to t 
nation's security — in Korea, and ' 
the Berlin and Cuban crises, as til 
most dramatic examples, but in I 
consistent daily support of the A\ 
Force as well. But we must all, t 
gether, keep working on it, keep ma 1 
ing progress in every area essenti' 
to the new Reserve responsibilities 

I am reminded of Billy Mitchel 
favorite admonition to his fellow ofl 
cers when, with an almost conspir 1 
torial approach, he was buildi) 
American air power: 

"Things are coming along we 
Keep going as you are." 



■ SCANNING from page 7 

H.R. 8340. A special pay bill aimed 
at attracting and retaining men with 
prior service who have needed skills, 
it will provide special pay to eligible 
enlisted men who enlist or reenlist 
in the Ready Reserve for a period of 
at least three years. The special pay 
would be $100 upon enlistment, re- 
enlistment or extension of enlistment, 
and an additional $100 upon com- 
pletion of each satisfactory year of 
that enlistment. STATUS: Air Force 
favors the purposes of the bill and 
its report to the House Armed Serv- 
ices Committee is now being co- 
ordinated by the Department of 
Defense. Suggested amendments state 
that this pay is in addition to other 
special or incentive pay and provides 
for Secretarial discretion on the re- 
fund provision. 

H.R. 8760. Concerns the training of 
certain Reserve units that are organ- 
ized to serve as a unit, it will au- 



thorize such units (other than the 
National Guard) to assemble for drill 
and instruction at least 48 times per 
year, and participate in training en- 
campments at least 15 days each 
year. It also explains what constitutes 
an assembly for drill and instruction 
and under what circumstances a unit 
or individual may receive drill credit. 
STATUS: Air Force has prepared a 
favorable report. Opinions of the Sec- 
retary of Defense and the Bureau of 
the Budget are not known. 

AFLI 1429. Establishes the Reserve 
Emergency Service Medal to be 
awarded to Reservists who, after 
Sept. 25, 1961 are involuntarily or- 
dered to active duty during periods 
of international tension or crisis. The 
Air Force has suggested the Order 
also include those who voluntarily 
served or will serve in direct support 
of contingency actions. STATUS: 
The proposed Executive Order was 
forwarded to BOB on July 1, 1963. 



T 



he Extension Course Institute h 
announced two Noncommissions. 
Officer courses. They are Course i 
NCO Academic Course, and Cour, 
7B, NCO Leadership Course. 

Course 7 is open to all airmen ar 
all enlisted men of any compone! 
of the U.S. Armed Forces who ha', 
not completed the old Officer Canci 
date School Correspondence Cours ( 
Course 7B is open only to those wr 
have completed the Officer Candida 
School Correspondence Course, i 
longer in the ECI curriculum. 

The NCO Academic Course is dj 
signed to provide general milita:! 
education for career minded airmei 
The NCO Leadership Course hi 
been set up to provide that inform 
tion in Course 7, not available in tlj 
old OCS correspondence course. 

ECI also announced that it w. 
unable to activate Career Develo 
ment Course 32350, "Defensive Fij 
Control Systems Mechanic," on N'| 
vember 1, as planned. 



10 



Civil Air Pairo 



ivil Air Patrol and the Air 
Force Reserve have taken initial 
s to establish a nationwide pro- 
n of mutual cooperation between 
P field units and members of the 
Force Reserve Recovery pro- 
n. The ultimate objective is a 
nger internal recovery program, 
ngthened by the augmentation ca- 
nities of Civil Air Patrol's per- 
lel and equipment, 
he first firm steps came recently 
he form of a message to all CAP 
2, commanders from the national 
jquarters at Ellington AFB, Tex. 
message laid the groundwork for 
plan which is designed to bring 
P s aircraft, facilities and person- 
into an active working relation- 
i with the nationwide recovery 
jion of the Air Force Reserve. The 
i calls for CAP personnel to be- 
ie familiar with the Recovery con- 
: and outlines specific guidance for 
employment of CAP resources, 
wo primary assumptions form the 
s of the plan: ( 1 ) That CAP will 
able to provide certain services 
:h are not otherwise available, 
(2) That pre-selected CAP units, 
i prior local Civil Defense Agency 
rdination, will be available for 
?ort of the Recovery mission, 
rom Headquarters, Continental 
Command, the Air Force's major 
:ommand which is responsible for 
supervision and logistical support 
:he Air Force Reserve, instruc- 
s have been forwarded to all Re- 
:ry unit commanders directing 
n to enlist the cooperation and 
inteer participation of local CAP 
s in their Recovery mission. They 
e also asked to develop plans and 
:edures detailing the tasks to be 
gned the CAP units, 
he Air Force Reserve Recovery 
*ram is nationwide in scope and 
nade up of 82 Recovery groups 
200 Recovery squadrons. It has 
authorized manning allowance of 
)00 Reservists. The Recovery con- 
t embodies the use of Air Force 
ervists to assist with the dispersal, 
raft recovery and reconstitution of 
planes and equipment of the Air 
ce following a nuclear attack upon 
country. Since their inception on 
i I, 1961, the Recovery units have 
ven themselves a capable and 
icated segment of the Air Reserve 
ces. Their training for the post- 
ck recovery mission has served 



on numerous occasions to provide 
"live" support to pilots and crews of 
aircraft faced with emergency land- 
ings. The addition of CAP's person- 
nel and resources to those of the Re- 
covery units will undoubtedly give 
new stature and capability to an al- 
ready valuable force. 

The actual number of CAP units 
and personnel which will ultimately 
take part in CAP's Reserve Recovery 
Mission Support program will not be 
known until the Recovery unit com- 
manders have evaluated and made 
known their individual requirements. 
To determine these needs Recovery 
commanders will consider five specific 
areas: flying operations, (including 
light transport, courier, reconnais- 
sance, damage assessment and aerial 
radiological monitoring); communi- 
cations; medical; ground transporta- 
tion; and personnel. 

CAP has an impressive inventory 
of men and equipment. It has ap- 
proximately 4.200 corporate or mem- 
ber owned light aircraft; a nationwide 
communications network of about 
14,500 fixed, mobile or airborne 
radio stations; about 4,500 surface 
vehicles, and personnel numbering 
close to 80,000 of which nearly 
48,000 represent the vitally neces- 
sary and promising youth of the 
nation — the CAP Cadets. CAP units 
now contain a wide variety of skill 
specialties, each of great potential 
value to assisting with the Recovery 
mission. They include pilots, doctors, 
nurses, vehicle operators and me- 



chanics, radio operators and repair- 
men, medical specialists, clerical spe- 
cialists, trained ground rescue teams. 
and also trained radiological monitor- 
ing teams. 

Although responsibility for tapping 
this vast amount of CAP potential 
rests with Recovery group command- 
ers, CAP wing commanders were 
given the responsibility of volunteer- 
ing the services of their units to the 
Recovery group commanders in their 
geographic areas. 

CAP's Recovery Mission Support 
plan does not call for instituting a 
specialized training program for all 
members, but selected units are in- 
structed by the plan to broaden their 
unit training to include the mission 
and organization of Recovery units 
and survival and CBR (chemical, 
biological and radiological ) training. 
To familiarize CAP members with the 
Recovery mission, the plan calls for 
active participation and on-site ob- 
servation of Recovery unit training, 
exercises and tests. 

Civil Air Patrol and the Air Force 
Reserve have often worked in close 
harmony to achieve a variety of goals 
from their search and rescue opera- 
tions to the aerospace education of 
the youth of our nation. This new 
plan for a broader and even more 
active working relationship follows 
naturally on these past accomplish- 
ments, and has the firm support of 
such top level Air Force leaders as 
the Secretary of the Air Force and 
the Chief of Staff. 




CAP's nationwide communications network of equipment and t ruined person- 
nel will serve as a vital adjunct to the Air Force Reserve's Recovery capability. 



n 



The Continental Air Command, 
currently headquartered at Robins 
AFB. Georgia, and under the com- 
mand of Lieutenant General Edward 
J. Timberlake. is perhaps the only 
major air command whose beginnings 
can be traced in part to a Presidential 
executive order. 

On October 15. 1948, President 
Truman, long an advocate of strong 
reserve forces, issued Executive Or- 
der 10007. directing the services to 
energize their reserve programs and 
to "utilize every practicable resource 
of the regular components" towards 
that end. In response the Air Force 
organized CONAC at Mitchel AFB, 
New York on December I, 1948. 
The founding of the new command 
was also intended to accentuate 
USAPs air defense effort. 

The newly formed command rep- 
resented a merging of the resources 
and activities of the pre-existing Air 
Defense" Command and Tactical Air 
Command, augmented by three fight- 
er wings inherited from the Strategic 
Air Command. Bases and units that 
had previously been assigned to ADC 
and TAC, including the four num- 
bered air forces (the First, Fourth, 
Tenth and Fourteenth) of ADC and 
the two (the Ninth and Twelfth) of 
TAC were reassigned to the com- 
mand jurisdiction of CONAC. Head- 
quarters of both ADC and TAC, con- 
siderably reduced in size, were re- 
tained within the command as plan- 
ning and operational headquarters. 

CON AC's three primary mission 
areas were air defense of the U.S., 
tactical air support of the ground 
forces, and the Air Reserve Forces. 
In addition CONAC was charged 
with the responsibility for a number 
of functions whose furtherance was 
suited to the command's area or ter- 
ritorial system of organization. 

In 1949 ADC became a "paper" 
organization and was supplanted by 
the Eastern and Western Air De- 
fense Forces. In the following year, 
CONAC's six regional air forces 
were regrouped into four (First, 
Fourth, Tenth, and Fourteenth) and 
the domain of each adjusted. 

With the outbreak of the Korean 
conflict in June 1950, CONAC's 
reserve mobilization mission was 
projected to a position of prime im- 
portance. It was a mission crucially 
important to Air Force operations 
both in the Far East and at home. 
Under CONAC auspices, the 25 Air 
Force Reserve flying wings as well 
22 of the 27 Air National Guard 
wings, plus various other ANG units, 
were mobilized. In addition over 
1 1 8.000 individual Reservists were 



processed, mainly by CONAC, into 
active military service. In all, 147,000 
Air Force Reservists and 45,000 Air 
National Guardsmen were mobilized 
to augment USAF's active forces. 

The impetus given tactical aviation 
by the Korean conflict led to the re- 
establishment of TAC as a major air 
command on December 1, 1950, and 
the transfer to that command of 
CONAC's tactical and troop carrier 
units and bases". A month later, ADC 
was revived and restored to major 
command status, leading in turn to 
the separation of air defense from 
the missions of CONAC and ending 
two years of intensive activity on the 
part of the command to create an 
effective air defense system for the 
U.S. Its achievements in that regard 
were noteworthy. It was CONAC 
which built the first air defense system 
in America's history. 

The "reconstructed" CONAC con- 
cerned itself with its Reserve Forces 
responsibilities and its score of minor 
missions and tasks, augmented in the 
years 1951-1953 by the following: 
USAF's collateral responsibilities for 
antisubmarine warfare, the conduct 
of special air missions, the providing 
of career testing services for the Air 
Force, the administration of Air Force 
personnel assigned to recruiting 
duties, the conduct of various officer 
procurement programs, and the op- 
eration of the Military Affiliate 
Radio System program. These gains 
were offset in 1952 by the loss of the 
Air Force Reserve Officers Training 
Corps to the Air University. 

In 1951 CONAC was invested 
with the responsibility for training 
and equipping engineer aviation units 
to accomplish Air Force construction 
overseas, a responsibility which it 
discharged through the instrument 
tality of an Aviation Engineer Force, 
established at Wolters AFB, Texas, 
on April 1, 1951. From that date 
to March 1956, when all engineer 
aviation units were returned to Army 
control, CONAC, operating through 
AEF, trained 57 engineer aviation 
units and deployed 33 overseas. 

The main tasks to which CONAC 
addressed itself in 1951 were the re- 
building of the Air Force Reserve, 
the reconstituting and refining of its 
Reserve training structure, and the 
evolving of effective, realistic train- 
ing programs. In October 1951, sur- 
veys were initiated to obtain an ac- 
curate inventory of Air Force 
Reservists in the U.S. In December 
1 95 1 , the first four of a total of eight 
Air Reserve districts and the first 
five of an ultimate total of 20 spe- 
cialist training centers were intro- 




duced into the Reserve structure.! 
July 1, 1952, flying training was r 
sumed in the Reserve program. 

The establishment of CONAi' 
Air Reserve Records Center on ^ 
vember 1, 1953 as a central reposittj 
for Reserve master personnel reca] 
marked a milestone in personnel i\ 
ministration. The center was respc 
sible for the perfection of records a] 
for various personnel functions. 

A reevaluation of the Air Fo i 
Reserve program by the Resei 
Program Review Board (i.e., 1 
Johnson Board) in August 1953 bj 
a number of important effects up] 
the Reserve program. One such , 
feet was the establishment of t] 
initial 50 Air Reserve centers j 
CONAC on April 1, 1954. The cd 
ters represented the fusion in a sin; 
organization of the functions and 
sponsibilities of the Air Reserve o 
tricts, the specialist training cente 
and the volunteer training units. 

In 1955, acting in accordance w 
General Twining's policy statemt 
on January 4 of that year, CON/ 
gave increased emphasis to the c 
velopment of combat-ready Resei 
Forces units capable of employms 
and deployment on D-Day. In 1 
following year, a similar degree 
emphasis was placed upon qualifyi 
individual Reservists for their D-D 
assignments and aligning them w 
specific mobilization requirements. 

At CONAC's suggestion, the I 
Reserve Forces Functions Revi 
Committee (i.e., the Stone Boar 
was formed in November 1956 to 
view and identify USAF functic 
and tasks which could be perform 
in peacetime by the Air Reset 
Forces. OPERATION 16-TON, 
which CONAC's Air Force Resei 
troop carrier wings had airlifted '<. 
proximately one million pounds 
equipment to the Caribbean, had 



'2 



IE EVOLUTION 
OF CONAC 



1948-1963 



i provided a striking demonstra- 
of the way in which Air Force 
rve transport capabilities could 
xploited in peacetime. 

June 1957 the way was cleared 
TONAC to proceed with the im- 
entation of a plan which it had 

espoused — the Air Reserve 
nician Plan. The plan was de- 
d to improve the combat readi- 
of the Reserve flying wings by 
iding each unit with a cadre 

of trained, highly skilled per- 
el available for immediate mobili- 
n. In the same month, a CONAC 
of an entirely different order and 
icter, its Inland Search and 
ue Plan, was unfurled, the di- 
consequence of CONAC having 

designated in September 1956 
le Air Force's executive agent 
oordinating search and rescue 
ities in the continental U. S. 

November 1957 Air Force 
omy moves forced a reduction 
e number of CONAC's Reserve 
I wings from 24 to 15. Economy 
rs were also responsible for the 
•ntinuance of Headquarters, First 
^orce, in June 1958 and for the 
nation of 1 1 Air Reserve train- 
enters in the following month. 
) ease span-of-control problems 
CONAC's three remaining air 
s (the Fourth, Tenth, and Four- 
h) and to provide more effec- 
supervision of individual train- 
16 Air Reserve training wings 

organized in July 1958 as an 
on intermediate between the 
t>ered Air Force headquarters 
:he 82 Air Reserve centers, 
i January 1, 1959, Air Force 
>nsibilities with respect to the 

Air Patrol were assumed by 
JAC, and the Air Force's liaison 
advisory organization, Headquar- 
CAP-USAF, was transferred to 
lAC's jurisdiction. The CAP, 



with 72.000 members, was active 
mainly in 4 areas; search and rescue, 
disaster relief and civil defense, avia- 
tion education, and communications 
(notably in providing a communica- 
tions back-up for military use). 

During 1960, major changes took 
place in the CONAC command struc- 
ture, in the command's mission re- 
sponsibilities, and in the Reserve pro- 
gram itself, all deriving from USAF's 
Plan for the Revised Management of 
the Reserve Forces (May 20, 1960). 
CONAC's three numbered Air Force 
headquarters (the Fourth. Tenth, and 
Fourteenth) were disbanded; in their 
stead as the command's major 
subordinate commands were organ- 
ized six Air Force Reserve regions, 
manned with a mix of active duty 
and Reserve personnel. The com- 
mand's Air Force Reserve training 
wings were redesignated Air Force 
Reserve sectors. Several of the com- 
mand's lesser missions were trans- 
ferred to other major commands. 

As part of the same Revised 
Management Plan, responsibility for 
the supervision of training and in- 
spection of Reserve Forces units was 
transferred to the units' gaining com- 
mands, thereby ending CONAC's 
connection with the Air National 
Guard and correspondingly reducing 
its role in managing the Air Force 
Reserve troop carrier wings and most 
of the other Category "A" units. 
CONAC. however, retained its basic 
command responsibilities of these 
units (as it did for the entire Air 
Force Reserve) and was responsible 
for the units' budgetary, logistical, 
and personnel support. For Reserve 
units which CONAC itself was the 
gaining command, CONAC had total 
responsibility, including inspection 
and the supervision of training. 

Also set into motion as a result 
of the USAF Plan of May 20, 1960. 
was a conversion of most of the Air 
Force Reserve individual training 
program, as conducted by CONAC's 
Air Reserve centers, to a brand new 
program — the Air Force Reserve 
Recovery Program. The latter pro- 
gram, which by July 1, 1961, com- 
prised 82 recovery groups and 200 
recovery squadrons, was intended to 
assist in the recovery and reconstitu- 
tion of Air Force operational capa- 
bilities in the event of nuclear attack 
and to provide support for Air Force 
dispersal operations during periods 
of tension or attack. The command's 
Air Reserve centers and their as- 
signed Air Reserve groups were dis- 
continued concurrently with the ac- 
tivation of the recovery groups. 

In December 1960, Washington 



announced that Mitchel AFB would 
he closed and that Headquarters 
CONAC would be moved from that 
base to Robins AFB. Georgia. On 
April 17. 1961, the command was 
fully operaiional in its new location. 

With the consolidation of all Air 
Force search and rescue operations 
under the Air Rescue Service in 1961, 
CONAC's SAR responsibilities were 
transferred to that command on Feb- 
ruary I of that year. From June I. 
1957, when CONAC's SAR activi- 
ties got under way. to February 1, 
1961, the command's five rescue eo- 
ordination centers directed 45,000 
sorties and were instrumental in sav- 
ing nearly 2,000 lives. 

In the build-up of Air Force active 
strength ordered by the late Presi- 
dent Kennedv in the summer and fall 
of 1961 (ie.. Berlin crisis), CONAC 
contributed two Air Force Reserve 
troop carrier wings and their five 
troop carrier squadrons and support- 
ing elements. CONAC, through its 
Air Reserve Records Center, also 
provided the filler personnel neces- 
sary to bring recalled Air Force 
Reserve and Air National Guard units 
to full strength. And in subsequent 
deployments of a considerable num- 
ber of ANG units to overseas bases, 
members of CONAC's five Reserve 
air rescue squadrons, on special tours 
of active duty, provided additional 
rescue service for the jet fighters on 
their transatlantic flight. 

CONAC's role in the Cuban crisis 
of October 1962 was even more im- 
pressive. The command's main con- 
tributions during that contingency 
were in the following areas: (1) the 
call-up of 8 Air Force Reserve troop 
carrier wings and 6 Reserve aerial 
port squadrons, comprising over 
1 4.000 Reservists and constituting a 
significant augmentation of USAF 
airlift and loadmaster capabilities. 
(2) The providing of extensive air- 
lift support in actions related to the 
build-up in Florida and the over- 
all USAF preparedness effort. (3) 
The support by Reserve air rescue 
personnel of Air Rescue Service op- 
erations in the southeastern United 
States. (4) The assistance rendered 
MATS by CONAC's non-recalled 
C-124 units in airlifting backlogged 
MATS cargo to various destinations. 
( 5 ) The voluntary support by 32 of 
CONAC's recovery units of the SAC, 
ADC, and TAC dispersal programs 
as well as the rendering of substantial 
assistance in other preparedness ac- 
tions of the various major air com- 
mands. (6) Airlift participation in the 
redeployment of troops and cargo 
from the southeastern U. S. 



13 






ted 



ALABAMA 
Bates Fid., 908 TCGp. Officer: 
iO-2 i, 12 opening in AFSC I055Z; 

0-3 five in I435AI. EnlUted. 271X0. 
E-4 7; 4.31X1A. E-3 6; 602X0. E- 
5 6; ""02X0. E-3 5. 

CALIFORNIA 

Hamilton AFB. 938 TCGp . En 
listed: 291X0. E-4 6: 471X1. E-3 5; 
571X0 E-3 6: 671X0. E-9: 902XOB. 
E-5 7; 982X0. E-6. 

March AFB, 942 TCGp.. Officer: 
(0-2 3 seven in 1055Z). Enlisted: 
274X0 E-4 5; 431X1 A. E-4 6; 
S71X0. E-4 6; 643X0A. E-4 5; 
645X0. E-4 5. 

943 TCGp., Officer: (0-2 3. 14 in 
1055Z). Enlisted: 274X0. E-4 5; 
431X1A. E-4 6: 545X0. E-4 6; 
$71X0. E-4 6: 643X0A. E-4 6. 

944 TCGp., Officer: (0-2 3, nine in 
1055Z). Enlisted: 274X0. E-4 '5; 
431 XI A, E-4 6; 563X0. E-4 6: 
643X0A. E-4 5: 645X0. E-4 5. 

McClellan AFB, 87 ATermSq.. 
Enlisted: 605X0. E-4 7: 605X1, E- 
4 5: 606X0. E-4 5. 

946 TCGp., Officer: iO-2 3. 31 in 
I055Z). Enlisted: 274X0. E-5: 424X0. 
E-4 5: 551XO. E-7; 903X0, E-6; 
904XOB. E-6. 

Travis AFB, 82 ATermSq.. En- 
listed: 605X0. E-4 7: 605X1. E-4/5; 
702X0. E-4 5. 

CONNECTICUT 
Bradlev FM., 905 TCGp.. Officer 
(0-2 3. 14 in 1055Z). Enlisted 
A43151A. E-5; 431X1A. E-3 6 
571X0. E-3 6; 622X0. E-3 5; 646X0. 
E-4 6. 

FLORIDA 

Homestead AFB, 90 ATermSq.. 
Officer: (0-2 3. one in 6044). En- 
listed: 60550. E-4 5; 60551. E-4 5; 
64650. E-4; 70250, E-4. 

915 TCGp., Officer: (0-2/3, 11 in 
1055Z). Enlisted: 431X1A. E-3/5; 
432X1. E-3 4; 565X0, E-3 6; 571X0. 
E-3 5; 643X0A, E-3/4. 

GEORGIA 
Dobbins AFB, 918 TCGp.. Officer: 
iO-2 3. five in 1055A. 0-2/3, two 
in 1535: 0-2 3. one in 6724). En- 
listed: 271X0. E-4/7; 431X1A, E-3/6; 
62250. E-4. 

ILLINOIS 

O Hare IAP, 91 ATermSq. En- 
listed: 60551. E-4; 60570. E-6. 

92* TCGp., Officer: (0-2 3. five 
in 1535; 0-4. two in 9356). Enlisted: 
565X0. E-3 6; 571X0. E-3 6; 646X0. 
E^» 6; 75170, E-6. 

Scott AFB, 932 TCGp.. Officer: 
(0-2 3. 18 in 1055Z: 0-3. five in 
1435AZ; 0-2/3, nine in 1535; 0-3, 
one in 9025; 0-4. two in 9356; 0-3. 
one in 9826i. Enlisted: 271X0, E- 
4 6; 431X1A. E-3 6; A607X0. E-4/7; 
622X0. E-3 4: 647X0. E-3 5; 702X0. 
E-3 5. 

INDIANA 
Bakalar AFB. 434 TCWg.. Officer: 
(0-2 3. 34 in 1055Z; 0-2 3. 19 in 
1535). Enlisted: 271X0. E-3 6; 
431XIA. E-4 8: 571X0. E-3/8; 
702X0. E-3 8 

LOUISIANA 

Barksdale AFB, 917 TCGp., Offi- 
cer: (C)-2 3. four in 1055C; 0-3. 
ihree in 1435: 0-4. two in 9356). 
Enlisted: A43570. E-6 7; A6073A. 
E-4; 643X0A. E-4 6 

New Orleans. 926 TCGp., En- 
l.stcd 42IX1A. E-3 6; 471X1. E-3 5; 
552X0. E-J 5; 5~1X0. E-3 6; 622X0. 
1-3 4. 702X0. E-4 6. 



MARYLAND 

\ndrrwt AFB. 9<>9 Tt'Gp . Officer 

if) 2 I. ten in 1055Z. O -3. one in 

1334) Enlisted 241X0. E-5 6; 

274.30. E-5; 411X1 A. E-J 6: 704X0. 



MASSACHUSETTS 
L. G. Hanscom Fid., 85 ATerm 
Sq.. Enlisted. 60551. E-4/5. 

901 TCGp., Officer (O -2 3. 15 

in 1055Z). Enlisted: 431X1A. t- 

3 6; 471X1. E-3 5; 571X0. E-3 6: 
643X0A, E-3 5: 902X0B. E-3 5 

MICHIGAN 
Selfridge AFB. 403 TCWg., Offi- 
cer: tO-2 3. 25 in I055Z: 0-2 3. 13 
in 1535). Enlisted: A29352. E-5; 
A431X1A. E-5 6; 571X0. E-4/6; 
A607X0. E-4 7. 

MINNESOTA 
Mpls.-St.Panl IAP, 934 TCGp.. 
Enlisted: 431X1A. E-3 5; 47151, E- 

4 S: ^65X0. E-3 5; 571X0. E-3 6: 
702X0. E-3 5. 

MISSOURI 
Richards-Gebaur AFB, 442 TCWg.. 

Officer: (0-2 3. nine in 1055C; O- 

2 3 five in 15.35). Enlisted: A43570. 
E-6 7; 471X1. E-3 5; 64.3X0A. E- 

3 7; 571X0, E-3 6. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
Grenier Fid., 902 TCGp., Officer: 
(0-2 3. 27 in 1055: 0-3, one in 
1334; 0-3, five in 1435; 0-2 3. four 
in 1535; 0-4. one in 8816: 0-4. one 
in 9356). Enlisted: A29352. E-5 
431X1A. E-3 6; 432X1. E-3 6 
571X0. E-3/8; A607X0. E-4 6 
702X0. E-3/5. 

NEW JERSEY 

McGuire AFB, 88 ATermSq., En- 
listed: 60551, E-4. 

514 TCWg., Officer: (0-2/3, 13 in 
1055Z). Enlisted: A29352. E-5; 
A43151A. E-5; 56350. E-4 5; 646X0. 
E-4/6; 68370. E-7. 

NEW YORK 

Stewart AFB, 904 TCGp., Officer: 
(0-2/3. ten in 1055Z; 0-4. one in 
9356). Enlisted: 271X0. E-4, 7; 
274X0. E-5; 90370, E-6; 90470B, E-6. 

Niagara Falls MAP, 914 TCGp.. 
Officer: (0-2 3, 11 in 1055Z). En- 
listed: 431X1A, E-3/5; 571X0. E-3 5; 
64550. E-4/5; 647X0, E-3 5; 702X0, 
E-3/5. 

OHIO 
Clinton County AFB, 302 TCWg.. 
Officer: (0-2/3. 52 in 1055Z; 0-3. 
four in 1435; 0-3. four in 5526). 
Enlisted: 27430. E-5; 291X0. E-4 5; 
431X1 A, E-4/5. 

OKLAHOMA 

Davis Fid., 929 TCGp.. Officer: 
(0-2/3, 21 in 1055Z: 0-3, five in 
1435; 0-2/5. 15 in 1535). Enlisted. 
291X0. E^»/6; 43IX1A, E-3/6; 
702X0. E-4/5. 

Tinker AFB, 937 TCGp.. Enlisted: 
27430. E-5; 29150. E-4/5; A43570. 
E-«/7; 461X0. E-3/5; 9O270B, E-7. 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Wyoming, 92 ATermSq.. Enlisted: 

605X0. E-4/5; 605X1, E-4/5. 

Greater Pittsburgh AP, 911 TCGp., 
Officer: (0-2/3, 14 in 1055Z). En- 
listed: 291X0, E-4/5; 431X1A, E- 
3 5; 571X0. E-3/5; 645X0, E-4/5; 
64670, E-6/7. 

TENNESSEE 

Memphis MAP, 919 TCGp.. Offi- 
cer: (0-2/3, 30 in I055A; 0-3, one 
in 1334; 0-.3. one in 1435A; 0-3 
three in 1435Z; O.3. two in 15.35 
0-2.3, one in 6444A). Enlisted 
43IXIA. E-3/6; 565X0. E-4/6 
571X0. E-3/5; 622X0. E-3/4; 645X0, 
E-4/6; 7.3290, E-8. 

9M TCGp., Officer: (0-2/3. 22 in 
1055A: 0-3, five in 14.35Z; 0-3. one 
in 1535. 0-3. one in 4344; 0-2/3, 
one in 6444A; 0-3. one in 7344). 
Enlisted 29150, E-4/5; 43IXIA, E- 
3 6. S65X0, E-3/5; 571X0. E-3/5; 
622X0. E-3 4; 685X0. E-3/7. 



LEGEND: For officer grade identification: 0-6 standi for Col., 
It Col.; 0-4, Maj., 0-3, Capt.; 0-2, 1 »t Lt. Where openings exist in 
same Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) for more than one grade, 
lowest and highest grades are indicated. Example: O 2 5 meant 
are openings for grades first lieutenant through lieutenant cole 
Enlisted: The AFSC identifies the job title The letter "X" in 
(646X0) indicates openings in more than one grade E 2 indie 
airman third class, E-3, A2C; E-4, A1C, 15. SSgt; E-6, TSgt, 
MSgt; E-8, SMSgt, and E-9, CMSgt. Example. 702XO, E-3 7 indice 
openings for airmen second dais to master sergeant in the admin 
trative career field. 
Positions offer up to 48 paid drills, a 15-day tour of active du 
annually, retirement points, and possible promotion. Appli 
should write directly to unit of choice, giving full name, addre 
grade and Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC). 



OFFICER 

1055 Pilot Troop Carrier 6444 A 

1334 Fit Test Maint. 6724 

1435 Air Operations 7344 

1535 Navigator 8816 

4344 Aircraft Maint. 9025 

5526 Base Engineer 9356 

6044 Transportation 8926 



Food Services 
Accounting/ Finance 
Personnel Services 
Legal Staff 
Medical (Admin) 
Medical (Aerospace) 
Dental (General) 



ENLISTED 



204X0 
241X0 
271X0 
274X0 
291X0 
A293X2 

361X0 

304X4 
363X0 
424X0 

A431X1A 

431X1A 

432X1 



Intelligence Ops. 

Safety 

Air Operations 

Command Post 

Communications 

Airborne Radio 

Ops. 

Wire & Antenna 

Maint. 

Radio Comm. 

Comm. Equip. 

Acft. Fuel Sys. 

Mech. 

Acft. Mech. 

Acft. Mech. 

Recip. Engine 



571X0 
602X0 



Fire Protection 
Passenger & 
Household Goc 
Traffic 
605X0 Transportation 

(Air) 
605X1 Air Freight 

606X0 Flight Traffic 

A607X0 Acft Loadmaster 
622X0 Food Services 

643X0A Fuel Specialist 
645X0 Inventory Mgt. 

646X0 Supply (Orgn) 

647X0 Warehousing 

671X0 Accounting & 

Finance 





Mech. 


683X0 


Management 


A435X0 


Fit. Engineer 




Anlys. 


461X0 


Munitions 


685X0 


Data Processing i 


471X1 


Automotive 


702X0 


Administrative 




Rpmn. 


704X0 


Stenographic 


545X0 


Refrigeration 


73290 


Personnel 


551X0 


Roads 


751X0 


Education 




& Grounds 


902X0B 


Medical Services I 


552X0 


Woodworker 


903X0 


Radiology 


563X0 


Water /Waste 


904X0B 


Medical 




Proc. 




Laboratory 


565X0 


Heating 


982X0 


Dental Lab 



TEXAS 

Carswell AFB, 916 TCGp.. Officer: 
(0-4, two in 9356). Enlisted: 47151, 
E-4/5; 57150, E-4/5; 64350A, E-4/5; 
64550, E-45; 64750, E-4/5. 

923 TCGp., Enlisted: 291X0, E- 
4/6; 304X4, E^»/6; 361X0, E-4/5; 
363X0, E-4/5; 431X1A, E-3/6; 
571X0, E-3/6. 

Ellington AFB, 446 TCWg., En- 
listed: 291X0, E-l/6; A29352, E-5; 
431X1A, E-3/7; 571X0. E-3/6; 
643X0A, E-3/6; 645X0. E-3/5. 

UTAH 
Hill AFB, 945 TCGp., Officer: 
(0-2/5, 11 in I055Z; 0-2/5, two in 
1535). Enlisted: 291X0, E^»/6; 
431XIA, E-3/6; 571X0. E-3/6; 
702X0, E-4/6. 



WISCONSIN 
Gen Mitchell Fid., 440 TCV 

Officer; (0-2/3, 17 in 1055Z; 0-. 
Five in 1535). Enlisted: 27430. 1 
431X1A, E-3/6; 64350A. E^ 
67170, E-6. 

WASHINGTON 
McChord AFB, 86 ATerm" 

Officer: (0-2/3, two in 6044). 

listed: 605X0, E-3/4; 605X1. E-3 

64650. E-4/5. 

Paine AFB, 941 TCGp.. Oflfi 

(0-2/3, 20 in 1055Z; 0-2 3. tl 

in 1435Z). Enlisted: 204X0. E-M 

241X0, E-5/6; 271X0, E-3 6; 274 

E-5. 

Vancouver Bks., 83 ATerm 

Enlisted: 605X0. E-4 6; 605X1. 

4/5; 60690, E-8. 



All Air National Guard units are eligible, and encouraged to mek> 
known their officer and enlisted personnel vacancies through pub 
lication in the "Help Wanted" section of "The Air Reservist" maga 
zine. To do so, send unit lists to: National Guard Bureau, Office 
Public Affairs, Pentagon, Wash. 25, D. C. 



14 



VIRGINIA 

Tactical Air Command 
id 4500 Air Base Wg. 

Langley AFB 
C 0-6 5 4 3 2 


FLORIDA 

836 Air Division 

MacDill AFB 

AFSC 0-3 2 

3234A 1 

4344 1 

6424 2 2 

6476A 1 

6524 1 

7324 1 1 

8124 1 

8824 1 

8924 1 


CALIFORNIA 

831 Air Division 
George AFB 
AFSC 0-5 4 3 

3234A 1 

4344 2 

5544 

5554 

6424 

6476A 1 

6034 

6524 1 

6724 I 

6834 1 

7324 1 

8124 1 

8824 1 

8924 1 1 

9416 1 2 

9735 1 

9745 1 

9754 8 

9826 1 


2 


5 

A 1 
Z 5 

1 
6 
E ' 1 
A 1 
C 2 
1 

1 
3 1 

3 

A 1 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 2 
3 

2 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
E 1 

1 8 
1 1 

2 2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 2 
11 19 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

1 


NEW MEXICO 

832 Air Division 

Cannon AFB 

ASFC 0-6 5 4 3 2 


1 

2 


3 2 34 A 2 
5525 1 
5534 2 
5544 2 
6034 1 
6424 1 
6476A 2 
6524 1 
6834 1 
7324 2 1 
8124 1 
8924 1 1 
9035 1 
9056 1 
9124 1 
9156E 1 
9216 1 
9316 1 
9416 1 1 
9486 1 
9656 1 
9735 1 1 
9745 1 
9754 6 3 
9926 1 


4 


SOUTH CAROLINA 

354 Tactical Ftr. Wg. 
Myrtle Beach AFB 
AFSC 0-5 4 3 

1435Z 1 

4344 

4724 

5534 1 

5544 

5554 

6034 

6424 3 

6476A 1 

6524 

6854 1 

8054 

8124 

9016 1 

9025 

9316 1 

9826 1 

9926 1 


i 

2 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
3 

1 

1 
1 




2 


ORTH CAROLINA 

4th Tactical Ftr. Wg. 
eymour-Johnson AFB 


SOUTH CAROLINA 

Hq 9 Air Force and 837 

Combat Support Gp. 

Shaw AFB 

AFSC 0-S 4 3 2 




C 0-6 5 4 3 2 


TEXAS 

Hq 12 Air Force 
James Connally AFB 
AFSC O-S 4 

1435Z 

1916 1 

1925 

3234C 

4344 

6024 

6034 

6416 1 

6896 1 

7016 1 

7024 

8044 

8116 1 

8824 

9356 




A 2 

1 

1 

1 
1 1 
1 1 

1 




3254A 1 
4344 1 
5716 1 
6424 2 
6716 2 
6834 1 
7916 1 
8016 1 1 
8044 1 1 
8054 10 
9025 2 
9035 1 
9326 2 
9416 1 
9735 2 
9745 1 
9754 2 
9826 1 


3 

2 


TENNESSEE 

839 Air Division 
Sewart AFB 
C O-S 4 3 2 


1 
1 
1 
1 


C 1 
1 
1 

1 
A 1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 1 

1 

E 1 

1 

4 
2 
I 
1 
1 

1 
1 
6 


1 
1 

1 
1 


NEVADA 

4520 Combat Crew 

Training Wg. 

Nellis AFB 

AFSC 0-6 4 3 2 

3254A 1 
6424 1 1 
8824 2 
8924 1 1 
9316 1 
9416 1 
9745 1 
9826 2 




KANSAS 

388 Tactical Ftr. Wg. 
McConnell AFB 
AFSC 0-S 4 3 


2 


3234A 1 

4344 3 

8824 6 

9056 1 

9124 

9216 1 

9236 1 

9326 1 

9336 1 

9416 2 1 

9725 

9735 2 1 


1 




ARIZONA 

4510 Combat Crew 

Training Wg. 

Luke AFB 

AFSC 0-4 3 2 

5544 1 
5554 1 
8124 1 
8824 1 
8924 I 1 
9025 2 3 
9035 2 
9236 1 
9326 2 1 
9416 1 1 
9636 1 

9735 1 3 
9745 1 
9754 2 12 11 
9826 2 2 


1 


ORTH CAROLINA 


1 


64 Troop Carrier Wg. 

Pope AFB 
C O-S 4 3 2 


LOUISIANA 

401 Tactical Ftr. Wg. 
England AFB 
AFSC 0-4 3 




1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
A 1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

s 
1 
1 


2 


3234A 1 

5S34 1 

5544 

6424 

6476A 1 

6524 

6834 1 

7324 1 

8124 

8824 1 

9356 1 

9926 1 


2 
2 

1 

1 
1 



NEW MEXICO, Holloman AFB, 366th Tactical Fighter Wg., has 

one opening for a Capt. in AFSC: 3234A, and 3 openings for 

Capts. in AFSC: 4344. . 

FLORIDA, Homestead AFB, 31st Tactical Fighter Wg., has one 

opening for a Capt. in AFSC: 3234A, 

TEXAS, Dyess AFB, 516th Troop Carrier Wg.. has two openings 

for 1st Lt. in AFSC: 3234C. 



At left and above are officer vacancies which exist for Part I 
Mobilization Assignees within specified AFSCs at Tactical Air 
Command bases. Positions offer 24 inactive duty training pe- 
riods, pay based on category assigned, a 15 day active duty 
tour annually, retirement points, and possible promotion. Train- 
ing is performed with active duty unit to which assigned. Ap- 
plicants should correspond directly with unit of choice, giving 
full name, address, grade and Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC). 
Enlisted AFSCs at these units will be printed in the next issue. 



Printed below are officer and enlisted Part I mobilization as- 
signment vacancies at the 1501st Air Transport Wg. (H), Travis 
AFB, Calif., and at the 1607th Air Transport Wg., Dover AFB, 
Delaware. Rated positions are authorized pay for 48 training 
periods and 15 days active duty annually. Nonrated positions 
are authorized pay for 24 training periods and 15 days active 
duty per year. ■ 11 



CALIFORNIA 

Hq 1501 Air Transport Wg., 
Officer Enlisted 

AFSC Grade AFSC Grade 



Travis AFB 

Enlisted 
AFSC Grade 



1535 


0-2 


1925 


0-2 


1955 


0-3 


3275 B 


0-3 


4344 


0-2 


4355 


0-3 


4724 


0-3 


5534 


0-3/4 


6016 


0-4 


6024 


0-2/3 


6034 


0-3 


6424 


0-3 


6434A 


0-3 


6444A 


0-3 


6534 


0-3 


6816 


0-4 


6834 


0-3 


6896 


0-3 


7324 


0-2 


7344 


0-3 


7916 


0-4 


8816 


0-5 


8924 


0-3 


9016 


0-4/5 


9025 


0-3 


9035 


0-4 


9156F 


0-3 


9166 


0-3 


9186 


0-2 


9226 


0-3 


9236 


0-2/3 


9316 


0-6 


9366 


0-4/5 


9386 


0-4/6 


9416 


0-3/6 


9446 


0-3/4 


9476 


0-3 


9486 


0-3/5 


9546 


0-4 


9586 


0-4/5 


9636 


0-3 


9656 


0-4 


9716 


0-4 


9725 


0-2/3 


9735 


0-2/4 


9745 


0-2/4 


9754 


0-2/3 


9856 


0-5 


Enlisted 


22370 


E-6/7 



27170 

27470 

30170 

30190 

32430 

42151 

42152 

42153 

42171 

42172 

42173 

42250 

42251 

42271 

42353C 

42370 

42450 

42470 

43151A 

43151E 

43171A 

43171E 

43190 

43250 

43251 

43270 

43271 

43290 

43430 

43470 

A43570 

47170 

47190 

53150 

53250 

53370 

53450 

53470 

54270Z 

54570 

54670W 

55151 

55152 

55170 

55250 

55251 

55270 

55290 

56350 

56370 

56450Z 

56570 



E-6 

E-6/7 

E-7 

E-8/9 

E-5 

E-4 

E-4/5 

E-4/5 

E-6 

E-6/7 

E-6/7 

E-4 

E-4 

E-6/7 

E-4 

E-7 

E-4 

E-6/7 

E-4/5 

E-4/5 

E-6/7 

E-6/7 

E-8 

E-4/5 

E-4/5 

E-6/7 

E-6/7 

E-8 

E-5 

E-6 

E-6/7 

E-6/7 

E-8 

E-4 

E-4 

E-6 '7 

E-4 

E-6 

E-6. 7 

E-6 

E-6 

E-5 

E-5 

E-6 

E-4/5 

E-4/5 

E-6/7 

E-8 

E-5 

E-6/7 

E-4 

E-6 



56890 

56970 

56990 

57170 

58150 

58170 

58250 

60251 

60270 

60370 

60550 

60570 

A60650 

A60750 

A60770 

62270 

64270 

64370A 

64390 

64570 

64670 

64771 

65170 

67170 

67190 

68170 

68570A/B 

68770 

70150C 

70270 

70470 

70550 

70570 

71150 

72170 

7 3 270 B 

73290 

73370 

74151 

77150 

77170 

90252 

90270B 

90470A/B 

90450B 

90570 

90650 

90651 

90670 

90750 

90850 

92250A 



E-8 

E-7 

E-8 

E-6/7 

E-4/5 

E-6 

E-4 

E-4 

E-6 

E-6/7 

E-5 

E-6 7 

E-5 

E-5 

E-6 

E-6/7 

E-6/7 

E-7 

E-8 

E-6/7 

E-6/7 

E-6 7 

E-6 '7 

E-6 

E-8 

E-7 

E-7 

E-6/7 

E-4 

E-6/7 

E-6, 7 

E-5 

E-7 

E-4 

E-6/7 

E-6/7 

E-8/9 

E-6 7 

E-4 

E-4/5 

E-6/7 

E-4 

E-6/7 

E-6 

E-5 

E-6 

E-4/5 

E-4/5 

E-7 

E-4 

E-4 

E-4/5 



DELAWARE 

Hq 1607 Air Transport Wg. 

Dover AFB 

Officer 

AFSC Grade No. 



AFSC 



Enlisted 
Grade 



No. 



1045G 

1045E 

1416 

1535 

1535 

1584 

9025 

9316 

9316 

9356 

9416 

9656 

9716 

9816 



0-4 
0-2 
0-4 
0-3 
0-2 
0-3 
0-3 
0-5 
0-6 
0-6 
0-6 
0-4 
0-6 
0-6 



27170 

27470 

42173 

43171A 

43171A 

43171E 

4317IE 

43270 

43270 

43271 

43271 

A43570 

A43570 

60350A 

A60750 

A60770 

70270 



3 
3 
5 

14 
9 

19 
5 
6 
2 
8 
3 

59 

61 
5 

33 
7 

23 



15 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 



USAF Recurring Publication 30-1 
No. 30-H-10-63-324.632 




Q Marching down Washington's Pennsylvania Ave. to the beat of 
muffled drums, Reservists of the 459th TCWg., Andrews AFB, Md., 
led by their commander, Col. Charles Briggs, Jr., joined a sorrow- 
ful nation in paying last respects to the late President John F. Ken- 
nedy on November 25. © An H-34B helicopter hovers over simu- 
lated 'fire and rescue" operation during the height of recovery ex- 
ercise competition of the 9109th AFRRSq., at MacArthur Airport, 
Bohemia, New York. © "Why A Reserve?" Ranking officials of 
our Reserve Forces supplied the answer during a recent George- 
town University radio and TV forum in Washington, D. C. (l-r) 
Moderator Wallace Fanning; Ma). Gen. W. J. Sutton, chief of Army 
Reserve; Ma]. Gen. C. R. Low, asst. chief of staff for Reserve 
Forces, USAF; RADM W. C. Hughes, asst. chief of Naval Personnel 
for Naval Reserve, and Brig. Gen. R. R. Van Stockum, director of 
Marine Corps Reserve. © One of four C-124 crews from the 
442nd TCWg., Richards-Gebaur AFB, Mo., which recently provided 
airlift for the Air Force's X-15 research plane during Latin America 
showings, (l-r) TSgt. Walter Grace; A2C Terry Price; Ma). James 
Bartimus; TSgt. Floyd Dewnler; Ma). Robert Jones; Ma). Melvin 
Stower; MSgt. Frank Hibbs, and Ma). Claude Lawson. 



H 10-63-702-494 




m* 




13. 7V*< 






FEBRUARY 1964 



the air reservist 

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE AIR RESERVE FORCES 






* ' 



% 



•• % ' m 



mm 







k ;:>:.:: 



■ 



«%; 




\ 



v 



',# 



Not NecessgrmyBProl 



Mr\ 



m 



the air reservist 

Vol. XVI— No. 1 Feb. 1964 

AIR NATIONAL GUARD 
AIR FORCE RESERVE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 

EDITOR; 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 

The Air Reservist Is an official publication 

of Hq USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, D.C. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed In the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq USAF. 



the ' air nBSBryfst 


V • . 


f 




c 







ur cover highlights 1963 Air Reserve 
Forces activities: Top— Reserve troop 
carriers during Swift Strike III. Bottom 
— ANG fighter interceptor on alert duty. 
Though these activities were "praise- 
worthy," indications are "What is past 
is not necessarily prologue" (apologies 
to the 'Bard'). 1964 will be more de- 
manding than 1963. Much thought is 
being given to new missions, programs 
and policies. In this issue we attempt to 
feature the events of 1963 and project 
some of the changes in the offing. 




Reservists of 51st Casualty Staging Gp., Willow Grove, Pa., spent weekend 
in 'round-the-clock efforts helping McGuire AFB medics get military pal 
tients home for Christmas, (l-r) Reserve Capts. Eleanor Yesenko and Clara 
Williams and A2C Herman Soloman, ready litter patient for transfer! 



A 



double-barreled on-the-job train- 
ing program employing educational 
requirements as well as practical ap- 
plication of specific job principles 
has been launched by the Air Force. 
The program is designed to provide 
a trainee with an intimate knowledge 
of the duties and requirements of his 
specific job assignment. Theory and 
the broad fundamentals of his spe- 
cialty will be acquired through career 
development correspondence courses. 

Officials say narrowing of the field 
of knowledge which trainees must 
master will result in quicker upgrad- 
ing of skill levels and cut the amount 
of time spent in training status. It 
also relieves a commander of most 
training responsibilities except those 
in direct support of his mission. 

The new concept was implemented 
first in 16 specialty codes. All, except 
one, relate to the aircraft maintenance 
career fields. The exception is the 
security and law enforcement field. It 
will be applied to more as soon as 
training materials are available. 

The two-part program is to be 
conducted simultaneously. The por- 
tion where the trainee learns by doing 
will follow a job proficiency guide 
prepared by the working supervisor 
under the direction of the major air 
command. This guide will provide 
detailed knowledge required in the 
day-to-day performance of the train- 
ee's duties. Thus, if he is assigned to 
work on a particular jet engine, his 
entire training program is focused 
Qnly.^n : that type engine. Under the 
old program, a jet engine mechanic 



might be required to possess knowl- 
edge of several types. 

The trainee's broad knowledge of 
theory and fundamentals of his spe- 
cialty will come from courses offered 
by the Air University Extension 
Course Institute (see Nov. '63 The 
Air Reservist). Enrollment in the 
courses is mandatory and satisfactory 
completion is as necessary to upgrad- 
ing as is job proficiency. 

Specialty knowledge tests, based 
on material covered by career devel- 
opment courses, are being rewritten. 



An a step toward improving aerial 
port capability in the Air Reserve 
Forces, six Reserve aerial port squad- 
rons will be discontinued and forty 
aerial port flights are to be activated 
this month. 

The 40 new flights will be located 
with and assigned to troop carrier 
groups. They will use the same nu- 
merical designation as their parent 
troop carrier group. 

The reorganization is considered 
an interim step aimed at improved 
aerial port capability. The flights will 
be operated within equipment and 
money authorized and programmed 
for present aerial port squadrons 
pending authorization of additional 
resources. 

Current manpower authorizations i 
should permit initial Reserve manning 
of approximately 1 officer and 21 I 
airmen per flight. 

see SCANNING page 6 ' 



Part of your income as a Reservist 
j taxable . . . Many deductions are permitted 

This article by Guardsman Behren, 
i professor of taxation, may save you money. 



INCOME 
TAX 

by Capt. Robert A. Behren 

102nd Air Transport Sq. 



nt tax changes make it advisable for members of the 
jserve Forces to review their taxable "Reserve" income 
d allowable "Reserve" deductions. Taxable income for 
Reservist includes his basic pay for attending drills, 
lining duty and summer encampments, incentive pay 
■ hazardous duty, and special pay for certain profes- 
mal specialties. Retirement pay also is taxable unless 
: Reservist retired for reasons of physical disability re- 
Iting from active service. 

Not 'axable are the basic allowances for subsistence and 
arters paid while on active duty for training or while 
ending summer encampments. Also not taxable are 
iform allowances, rations furnished in kind to enlisted 
:servists, transportation in kind, and disability retire- 
;nt pay. 

Mileage and per diem allowances which exceed actual 
penses also are taxable income and must be labeled 
xcess Reimbursements" and included in wages. 
Revenue Ruling 55-109 is important to Reservists as it 
ncerns allowable deductions resulting from travel re- 
ired to attend drills. If a Reservist is required to make 
3S (not extending overnight) to attend drills that are 
nducted away from the area in which his regular place 
business is located, he may deduct his round trip ex- 
tises. However, if drills are held within the locality of 

regular place of business, transportation expenses are 
t deductible unless he is also working at some other 
siness location during the same day. Thus, a Reservist 
ending a weekend drill within his business area cannot 
duct his travel expenses unless he also works on his 
ilian job that same day. The Reservist attending an 
ming drill on a regular work day may deduct his one- 
y transportation expenses in getting from his civilian 
) to the drill. If he returns to his home before attending 
: drill, he can deduct only the lesser of the travel ex- 
ises from either his home or place of employment to 
11. These rules also apply to men attending supple- 
ntary training periods other than prescribed drills 
ether or not in pay status. 

What constitutes the area in which a regular place of 
siness is located is not spelled-out, but is a question of 
t which depends upon each circumstance. 
\ distinction is made between transportation expenses 
i "travel away from home." "Away from home" is 
srpreted as being away from home "overnight," and in 
:h cases the Reservist is allowed deductions for the cost 
his lodging, meals and transportation. If travel does not 
end "overnight," the cost of meals and lodging is not 
iuctible and travel expenses are deductible as previous- 
discussed. 

Reservists may deduct travel expenses (including meals, 
Iging and transportation) if they are on active duty for 
ining or attending service schools or field training away 
m their home base or place of business. These expenses 
y generally be deducted in full without offsetting the 
ount of basic subsistence and quarters allowances 
linst such expenses, although mileage and per diem 
Dwances must be offset. Thus, such costs are deductible 
jviding they are "ordinary and necessary." 



Reservists required to be away from home "overnight" 
because of official cross-country travel may deduct the 
cost of meals and lodging incurred during such trips as 
travel expenses. 

New tax regulations place a strict burden of substantia- 
tion on Reservists seeking deductions for travel expenses. 
The Reservist must prove that such expenses were in- 
curred and the amount of the expenses. The new sub- 
stantiation requirements pertain to record — keeping and 
documentation. (Although Reservists are not required to 
keep detailed records and documents, the lack of proper 
records may result in disallowed deductions if the tax 
return is challenged.) The new rules apply to travel ex- 
penses incurred while traveling away from home, i.e., over- 
night. If a Reservist claims such deductions he should 
record at or near the time the expense is paid: (1) the 
amount he spends daily, broken down into reasonable 
categories such as meals, lodging, etc.; (2) the dates of 
departure and return for each trip and the number of days 
spent in military activities; (3) the destination or locality 
of travel; and (4) the reason for the travel. Normally, 
when a Reservist travels under official orders, copies of 
those travel orders will meet the requirements of (2), (3) 
and (4) above. 

Adequate records and sworn statements will normally 
serve to substantiate claims for deductions involving travel 
expenses, but in unusual circumstances the Internal Rev- 
enue Service may require additional evidence. 

Reservists should retain documentary evidence (such 
as an itemized receipt) for any lodging expense incurred 
while traveling away from home and for any other expendi- 
ture of $25 or more. In other cases the retention of 
receipts is advisable even though not required. Proof of 
actual transportation costs will not be required if not 
readily available. 

The expense of using an automobile to meet Reserve 
commitments can be deducted as part of travel or trans- 
portation expenses. This is done by deducting either an 
allocable share of total automobile expenses based on the 
ratio of mileage attributable to Reserve activities, ( 1 ) over 
the total mileage, or (2) a standard mileage rate of ten 
cents per mile for the first 15,000 miles of Reserve use 
and seven cents per mile above that. The standard mileage 
rate is in lieu of all operating and fixed costs of the auto- 
mobile allocable to Reserve purposes, but parking fees 
and tolls can be deducted separately. 

Certain deductions are permissible regarding the uni- 
form worn by Reservists. He can deduct the cost of pur- 
chasing and maintaining it to the extent that the expenses 
exceeded any uniform allowances. 

It must be emphasized that the above "basic" rules are 
of "general" application and must be considered in the light 
of the particular circumstances of the individual Reservist. 
They are far from exhaustive; other tax techniques can 
be applied successfully in more specific situations. 

Except for uniform expenses, all of the above de- 
ductions are for adjusted gross income purposes, and 
can be deducted in addition to the 10 percent standard 
deduction. 



ANG: " . ..a more significant role . . . 



99 




New Equipment — F-105 "ThunderchieF' 





-overseas deployment «*■ New 

Instances of changes leading to a broader augmentation role for the Air Guard. 



"Berlin demonstrated that the Guard 
can be used as an instrument of 
foreign policy. As a result . . . we 
came to realize that the Guard must 
be ready now to respond to any need 
that would exist in either a cold 
or hot war situation — actual or po- 
tential. We have reached this goal. 
The Air National Guard now is pre- 
pared to play a more significant role 
in this era than any that has been re- 
quired of us in the past." — 

Maj. Gen. Winston P. Wilson, 
Chief, National Guard Bureau 



F 

I n 



r Air National Guardsmen, "What 
is past is [not necessarily] prologue." 
There will be changes, based on new 
missions, capabilities and require- 
ments. Following is an account of 
some of ANG's accomplishments in 
1963 and its plans for tomorrow: 

Flying Safety: During 1962, Air 
Guard pilots established a record low 
accident rate of 7.85. Through the 
concentrated efforts of ANG's officers 
and men, their flying safety record 



of December 31, 1963 stands at a 
new low of 7.5. ANG pilots flew a 
total of 314,445 hours in 1963. 

One unit which has contributed 
much toward ANG's low flying safety 
record is the 146th Air Transport 
Wing, Van Nuys, Calif. This unit 
recently completed its fourth con- 
secutive year of accident free flying. 
Since becoming one of the first two 
Air Guard units to convert from 
swept wing jet fighters to the four- 
engine C-97 "Stratofreighter" (Janu- 
ary 1960), the 146th flight crews 
have logged over 36,000 hours. In 
accomplishing their MATS missions 
they have flown throughout the 
United States and to Europe, the 
Far East and South America. A fac- 
tor which makes the wing's perfect 
flying safety record particularly not- 
able is that the Van Nuys airport is 
listed as third busiest in the U.S. 

Personnel: The shortage of per- 
sonnel was rated as a major problem 
area at the start of 1963, and was 
given special emphasis at every level 



of command. This problem was gen 
erated primarily by the Berlin an 
Cuba recalls. In addition to losses b| 
attrition there were no recruiting el 
forts by those units which had bee 
mobilized. In a massive effort to of 
set these personnel shortages, the Ne 
tional Guard Bureau announced earl 
in January 1963, the launching of 
repruiting drive labeled "Try Onej 
In the six-month period during whicj 
the "Try One" recruiting drive wi 
given maximum attention, the AN< 
strength climbed from 67,177 on De 
cember 31, 1962, to 74,325 on Jun 
30, 1963, a net increase of 7,148. 

Augmentation: Individual accon 
plishments by Air Guardsmen becan 
the norm. Last year, Air Guard pilo 
standing runway alerts flew the 
F89Js and F102s on more than 231 
000 occasions to make intercepts fc 
the North American Air Defend 
Command. One of ANG's outstam 
ing units, the 146th Fighter Inte 
ceptor Squadron, Pittsburgh, Pennsy! 
vania, achieved the distinction ■{ 



winning the Air Defense Command's 
"A" Award for all-around superiori- 
ty. As ANG's entrant in the Air 
Force 1963 "William Tell" competi- 
tion, the 146th led by its commander, 
Major George C. McCrory, captured 
the Richard I. Bong Trophy for bein« 
the best team in the F-102 category. 
They outscored their fourteen com- 
petitors in winning the Royal Ca- 
nadian Air Force Traveling Trophy. 
This demonstration by the 146th 
Citizen/Airmen against the finest 
teams in the Regular Air Force, 
prompted Lt. General Herbert B. 
Thatcher, commander, Air Defense 
Command, to write, "Air Defense 
Command is proud to have the Air 
Guard as full-fledged members of the 
Air Defense team. They provide a 
stability that is vitally important . . . 
They stand their share of runway 
alerts. Thank God for the Air Guard." 

ADC is not the only USAF major 
air command to employ the skills of 
Air Guardsmen. During the past year 
the Military Air Transport Service 
regularly called upon aircrews from 
25 ANG squadrons to fly many of 
its global airlift missions. Flying 
ANG's C-97 "Stratocruisers" or C- 
121 "Constellations," these Air Guard 
crews accomplished MATS missions 
to all points on the globe and at the 
same time trained for wartime serv- 
ice in strategic airlift. During 1963, 
sixteen ANG C-97 squadrons air- 
lifted 12 million pounds of MATS 
cargo while performing some 700 
overwater training missions. 

Recently ANG tanker aircraft, 
flight crews and ground personnel 
worked as a team to support the 3,- 
500 mile, non-stop flight of 12 recon- 
naissance jet aircraft from Birming- 
ham, Ala., to Anchorage, Alaska, to 
accomplish a photo reconnaissance 
mission for the Alaskan Air Com- 
mand. Labeled Project Minuteman 
Alpha, the mission required Guards- 
men to fly more than 300 hours and 
photograph some 250 targets in the 
vast and desolate regions of Alaska. 
Air Force Chief of Staff, General 
Curtis E. LeMay wrote of the event, 
"The history-making deployment to 
Alaska . . . certainly reflects credit 
upon ... the units which took part, 
and the Air National Guard. The 
detailed planning, professional air- 
manship and outstanding maintenance 
during this operation established a 
record for which we are all proud." 

Other instances of Air Guard pro- 
fessionalism being used during 1963 
to accomplish a USAF mission were 
displayed by Air Guard's GEE1A 



squadrons. GEEIA (Ground Elec- 
tronics Engineering Installation Agen- 
cy) units are a highly technical arm 
of the U. S. Air Force, and ANG's 
fifteen GEEIA and two communica- 
tions maintenance squadrons used 
their summer encampment periods to 
accomplish USAF directed missions. 

Problems: Air National Guard 
continues to have a shortage of rated 
officers, with most existing in the 
pilot and navigator career fields. The 
shortage of pilots was generated pri- 
marily from increased authorizations 
resulting from the conversion of 19 
fighter units to a heavy transport 
mission. For a similar reason the 
Air Guard still faces a shortage of 
navigators. The coming year will find 
greater emphasis placed on the pro- 
curement and training of new ANG 
pilots and navigators. 

Exercises: Throughout 1963 the 
Air Guard participated in a variety 
of U. S. Air Force and U. S. Army 
joint exercises, such as, LOGEX, Big 
Blast Papa, Apache Opal and Long 
Haul II. As important as each of 
these was to supporting the Regular 
forces and enhancing the skills of 
Guardsmen involved, Exercise Swift 
Strike III dominated the year's activi- 
ties. Air Guard C-97s and C-121 
transports worked with the CALSU 
(Combat Airlift Support Unit) at 
Sewart AFB, Tennessee. Aircraft 
control and radar surveillance also 
was provided by Guardsmen to both 
the Red and Blue forces which com- 
peted against each other during the 
exercise, and tactical fighter and re- 
connaissance support was furnished 
by Air Guard aircraft and crews. 

In addition to serving as a tool for 
practical experience, Exercise Swift 
Strike III also was used as a testing 
ground for new concepts. Improved 
techniques of battlefield fuel resupply 
by Air Guard KC-97 aerial tankers 
were given a thorough testing as was 
the practical support capability of its 
four new Air Commando groups. 

Projection '64: The year 1963 may 
best be described, generally, as a 
"productive" year for the Air Na- 
tional Guard, and with the successful 
completion of each mission, the over- 
all concept of Air Reserve Forces 
readiness and utility gains added 
strength. The coming year will find 
Guardsmen continuing to give profes- 
sional support, attacking old prob- 
lems, facing new ones, giving daily 
support to the Federal government 
and its active military forces, and 



standing ready to furnish immediate 
emergency support when called upon 
by local state authorities. New equip- 
ment, new personnel, and new mis- 
sion requirements will account for a 
continuation of the emphasis on train- 
ing and education. 

Under consideration is a plan for 
the deployment of an Air Guard jet 
tactical fighter squadron to Europe 
this coming summer. Although no 
specific unit has been selected for the 
overseas deployment, indications are 
that the 1 13th TFSq, Andrews AFB, 
Md., may be chosen. The 1 13th flies 
the F-100 and recently completed a 
tactical redeployment overseas to 
Puerto Rico. Whichever unit selected, 
will be supported by Regular Air 
Force units and other ANG aerial 
refueling and transport squadrons. 

Another unit which is likely to ex- 
perience a change is the 141st Tac- 
tical Fighter Sq., McGuire AFB, N. J. 
This unit soon will be the first ANG 
squadron to receive F-105s. 

New mission requirements will find 
ANG's aeromedical transport units 
converting to a straight transport mis- 
sion for the purpose of supporting 
MATS overseas commitments on a 
year-round basis. 

Changes in aircraft and missions 
are but one phase of expected devel- 
opments. Also keeping pace with 
changing requirements are Guards- 
men assigned to the Accounting and 
Finance, and Statistical Service sec- 
tions. The 106th Aeromedical Sup- 
port Group, Brooklyn, New York, 
recently became one of the first in the 
Air National Guard to automate com- 
pletely with data processing equip- 
ment. These Guardsmen now do a 
faster and more effective job of man- 
aging financial programs which aver- 
age two million dollars a year. 

Acceptance too, will be a major 
goal of the Air National Guard in 
the new year. By its professionalism 
and concientious application to the 
missions assigned, the Air National 
Guard of today can expect the new 
year to bring a greater awareness of 
its readiness and capabilities from 
the American public, the active mili- 
tary establishment and especially the 
gaining major air commands. 

Army General Paul D. Adams, 
commander-in-chief of America's 
powerful U. S. Strike Command, said 
the Guard ". . . must be prepared and 
ready, figuratively speaking, to march 
toward the front with us in an un- 
broken column." It is safe to say 
that 1964 will again prove ANG's 
desire to meet that objective. 




B-57s for Air Guard in 1964? Three ANG tactical fighter squadrons ex- 
pect to exchange F-86Hs for B-57s, and assume tactical bomber missions 
this spring if current plans are approved for the transfer of the aircraft. 



m SCANNING from page 2 

Every effort will be made to place 
those Reservists displaced by the re- 
organization through cross training 
and placement in other Reserve units. 
Loadmaster personnel currently as- 
signed to aerial port detachments will 
not be displaced because of variances 
in grade or AFSC. 



Standard policy on transfer of Re- 
serve officers and enlisted personnel 
to the Retired Reserve of the Re- 
serve Forces was spelled out recently 
in DOD directive 1200.4. 

Covered are circumstances under 
which the secretary of the service 
shall transfer retired members to the 
Retired Reserve as well as when 
members may request transfer. 

The directive also provides that at 
the time of transfer or assignment 
to the Retired Reserve, the member 
shall be placed on the retired list 
in the highest grade in which he has 
satisfactorily served or in the highest 
grade for which eligible by law. 

Generally, the policy says that a 
member may be assigned or trans- 
ferred, upon his application, to the 
Retired Reserve when he has (1) 
completed a total of 20 years hon- 
orable service in the Armed Forces, 
or (2) completed 10 or more years 
of active commissioned service, or 
(3) been found physically disqual- 
ified for active duty, or (4) attained 
the age of 37 years and completed 
a minimum of eight years service as 
described in Title 10, U. S. Code. 



A, 



.pplications are being accepted 
by Hq USAF for the recall of six 
non-EAD Reserve officers to fill 
8033/265 positions. AFR 45-22 
cites eligibility status and procedure 
for submitting applications. Qualified 
officers are encouraged to apply. 

Selected officers will be recalled to 
EAD in calendar year 1964 for a four 
year period and will function as prin- 
cipal advisors on Reserve affairs at 
Hq USAF and major commands. 

The following are the ranks, 
AFSC's and duty assignments which 
are open. Hq USAF: colonel, AFSC 
0016; and three lieutenant colonels, 
AFSC 3016, 7316 and 7516. One 
colonel, AFSC 0076, for Air Force 
Systems Command, and a colonel, 
AFSC 7016, for the Military Air 
Transport Service. 



LLconomic advantages and the need 
for community acceptance of the Air 
Reserve Forces. These were signifi- 
cant points stressed by Major General 
Curtis R. Low, assistant chief of staff 
for Reserve Forces, speaking to 
"Town Hall," an organization of 
leaders in business and industry in 
Los Angeles, Calif., on January 21. 
"The manning of Reserve Forces' 
units," said the general, "depends in 
large measure on the attitudes of the 
business and civic leaders of the local 
communities. The state of manning 
required for the essentially high de- 
gree of Reserve Forces readiness can 
be achieved only if the members of 



the Reserve Forces are supported by 
their employers, their families, and I 
by those with whom they come in i 
contact . . . The Air National Guard 
and the Air Force Reserve provided 
an essential segment of areospace 
power [during Berlin and Cuban 
crises]. They are part and parcel of 
our deterrent strength, and you and 
I should be mighty thankful for their 
existence." 



Briefly . . . 



Former Secretary of the Army. 
Cyrus R. Vance has succeeded Ros- 
well L. Gilpatric as Deputy Secretary 
of Defense. Mr. Gilpatric resigned to ■ 
return to his civilian law practice. 
Stephen Ailes, Under Secretary of the 
Army since 1961, assumed the post 
of Secretary of the Army. The new 
change makes Mr. Vance the second- 
ranking official in the Pentagon, un-, 
der Secretary of Defense Robert S. 
McNamara ... A new course in the j 
medical career area, USAF Medical 
Materiel Service, Course 9030, is 
now available through the Extension 
Course Institute. The course is made 
up of three volumes, and carries 99 1 
study hours, 33 credit points. It is 
designed to give the student a general 
understanding of the USAF Medical 
Materiel Service at all echelons, and' 
a comprehensive knowledge of thel 
medical supply program at base level.i 
No special eligibility requirements are 
needed to take the course. 

One Air Guard officer has been 
nominated for promotion to major 
general and four to the rank of briga- 
dier general by President Lyndon B. 
Johnson. Brigadier General George 
R. Doster, chief of staff, Alabama 
ANG, has been named for promotion 
to major general. Named for briga- 
dier general were: Colonel Duane L. 
Corning, adjutant general, South Da-j 
kota; Col. Staryl C. Austin Jr., as-J 
sistant adjutant general for air, Ore- 
gon; Col. George W. Edmonds, com- 
mander, 144th Air Defense Wing. 
Fresno, California; and Col. Harr> 
G. Staulcup, chief of staff, Delaware 
ANG. The nominations await Con- 
gressional approval. 

There will be a squadron reunior 
of WWII pilots of the 27th (Blacl 
Falcon) Squadron, 1st Fighter Group 
the latter part of this month in Phoe 
nix, Arizona. Officers and pilots wish 
ing additional information write 
Frederick D. Nichol, P.O. Box 2180 
N-381 Houston Research Center 
Houston 1, Texas . . . Members o 
the Nashville Chapter, 8440th Ai 
Force Reserve Recovery Group Aux 



iliary are anxious to correspond with 
other active Air Force Reserve aux- 
iliaries across the country. The chap- 
ter has just completed a successful 
first year as an active organization 
and would like to share their views, 
types of programs and other details 
with other auxiliaries. Their address 
is: Nashville Chapter, 8440th AFRR- 
3p. Auxiliary, 2720 Nolensville Rd„ 
Vashville, Tenn. (3721 1 ) Attn: Dep- 
Jty for Operations. 

A change to the Airman Classifica- 
:ion Manual in March will add sev- 
eral responsibilities to aircraft load- 
nasters when cargo aircraft are used 
:o haul troops. The additional duties 
nclude emergency briefings, equip- 
ment demonstrations and explana- 
ions, and emergency evacuation 
jrocedure drills. Also briefings on 
iomestic and foreign border agency 
:learance requirements. Loadmas- 
ers will be expected to carry out 
hese assignments during troop and 
init movements and joint airborne 
:xercises, and whenever troops are 
ransported on cargo aircraft without 
i flight traffic specialist aboard. 



°eop/e . . . 



Let's face it! It's impossible to 
over the individual exploits of ap- 
proximately one-half million Re- 
ervists within 16 pages. However, 
ve occasionally feel compelled to 
ive it the "college try." Here is a 
my sampling of the dedication within 
he Reserve program: 

MSgt. Joseph Pellittere, flight engi- 
leer with the 514th Troop Carrier 
Ving, McGuire AFB, New Jersey, 
as been credited with saving a wing 
M19 and possibly the lives of its 
rew. The aircraft was returning from 
n equipment drop mission last fall 
/hen the sergeant discovered its nose 
/heel was jammed. Making a quick 
ecision, he climbed down into the 
ircraft's open wheel well minus a 
arachute. Straddling a slippery strut 
?r support, he detached a bolt, re- 
using the nose wheel. He then re- 
amed to the aircraft's interior and 
ompleted the job of securing the 
'heel in a down position so that the 
lane could be landed safely. 

MSgt. William J. Conklin, an ad- 

isor attached to the 9101st Air Force 
-eserve Recovery Sq., Oriskany, 
r.Y., was recently awarded the Air- 
lan's Medal, for heroism. Sergeant 
■onklin voluntarily risked his life to 
iter a burning home, arouse its oc- 
cupants and save an elderly woman. 



TSgt. Elmer F. Schilling, load- 
master assigned to the 433rd Troop 
Carrier Wing, Kelly AFB, Texas, was 
recently awarded the Air Medal for 
"Meritorious Achievement" in aerial 
flight during last September's annual 
Troop Carrier Competition at Clinton 
County AFB, Ohio. He was cited for 
"courageous action and professional 
competence" in preparing a heavy 
equipment load for jettisoning sec- 
onds before his C-119 crash landed, 
thus preventing possible injury or 
death to those on board. 

1st Lt. Frederick P. Vasilchek and 
2nd Lt. Raymond F. Besecker, at- 
tached to the 109th Air Transport 
Group, Schenectady, New York 
ANG, recently saved a woman from 
plunging over the Niagara Falls. The 
Guardsmen noticed a woman float- 
ing in swift current 200 yards above 
the falls. Jumping onto rocks Lt. 
Vasilchek tossed the woman one end 
of his jacket, and brought her to safe- 
ty with the help of Lt. Besecker. 

MSgt. Lynn Stark, food service 
supervisor for the 939th Troop Car- 
rier Gp., Portland, Ore., is a walk- 
ing blood bank. He has donated 100 
or more pints of blood to the Ameri- 
can Red Cross during the past 20 



years. Stark originally set up his 
blood donation program as a living 
memorial to his brother Howard and 
a friend who were killed on Leyte 
during WWII. In addition to donating 
his own blood, Stark also has re- 
cruited thousands of pints of blood 
through the programs in Portland and 
Multnomah County, Oregon. 

Capt. Edwin W. Merkel, 184th 
Tactical Fighter Group, Wichita, 
Kansas Air National Guard, recently 
became the first ANG pilot to re- 
ceive North American Aviation's 
1,000-hour plaque for flying the F- 
100 Supersabre. The captain, an 
aeronautical engineer in civilian life, 
logged 600 hours of the time as an 
Air Force pilot before joining the 
Kansas Air Guard in 1960. 

Mr. George Koshollek, Jr., a staff 
member of the "Milwaukee Journal" 
newspaper, is responsible for the un- 
usually fine photograph we used for 
the cover of last month's issue. The 
photo featured C-119s of the 440th 
TCWg., Milwaukee, Wise, participat- 
ing in an exercise with the U. S. 
Army at Fort Campbell, Ky. Also, we 
thank Mr. Koshollek and the "Jour- 
nal" for another 440th troop-drop 
photo used on page 8, this issue. 




Guardsmen of 184th Tactical Ftr. Gp., Wichita, Kans., strate- 
gically display dramatic poster advertising need for rated officers. 

© Reservists of 90th Air Terminal Sq., Homestead AFB, Fla., com- 
pare MATS terminal methods with commercial airline's during tour. 



§r 






^€. 



• i\ 



AFRes: "... '64 will be a crucial year. 



91 




Support-^-joinf ArntY-lJSAF ;K*Vfcise 




Economy and effectiveness of Air Force Reserve's augmentation force is geared to all phases of I 



". . . I believe 1964 will be a 
crucial year in many ways . . . While 
we have made praiseworthy progress 
in 1963, I am not convinced that we 
have explored and uncovered all the 
ways in which the Air Force Reserve 
can be used as an economical and 
effective backup for the active estab- 
lishment . . . The Secretary and Chief 
of Staff of the Air Force have said 
again and again that the Air Force 
Reserve today is a more integral part 
of the total Air Force than ever be- 
fore. With this welcome beginning of 
recognition comes the obligations to 
live up to it." — 

Lt. Gen. Edward J. Timberlake, 

Commander, Continental Air Command 



A 



gain! ". . . [not necessarily] prologue." 
General Timberlake's seeking of ways, 
*'. . . Air Force Reserve can be used 
as an economical and effective back- 
up for the active establishment . . ." 
portends changes within the program. 
Following, is a review of the Air Force 
Reserve's progress in 1963 and a 
projection of its problems and plans: 

Internally: Air Force Reservists 
gave priority to achieving specific 
goals. The primary concern was pro- 
gramming; this concern continues. 



Several structural adjustments have 
improved the Air Force Reserve po- 
tential. Casualty Staging and Hos- 
pital units are being completely reor- 
ganized in order to attain a "Ready 
Now" Medical Reserve program. 
Aerial Port squadrons are to be dis- 
continued and replaced by flights. 
These will be integrated into the fly- 
ing units for greater "Total Force" 
effectiveness. (See story, pg. 2.) 

Two new Air Force Reserve units 
— the 1st and 2nd Air Postal — have 
been activated to augment the world- 
wide Military Postal and Armed 
Forces Courier Service. 

Manning was another subject of 
major concern and the attention given 
this resulted in general improvement, 
with a net increase of over 5,200 offi- 
cers and airmen during the past year. 
The troop carrier units increased their 
manning by over 2,400 since Jan. '63. 
The manning deficiencies were the 
result of several factors: the reor- 
ganization of the troop carrier pro- 
gram, the relocation of two of its 
groups, and the screening of some 
Reservists to standby status as a re- 
sult of their recall during the Berlin 
and Cuba crises. Several corrective 
actions were taken to achieve greater 
manpower: an increase in mandatory 
assignments of individuals having Re- 



serve obligations; an increase of mar 
days for training; an increase in func 
to permit use of an additional 1,00 
non-prior service personnel; th 
strengthening of the recruiting an 
retention program by establishing 
Recruitment Branch at Headquartei 
CONAC with permanent coordinate 
at sector headquarters and, placin 
emphasis on the need of better ma? 
agement techniques throughout tl 
Air Force Reserve. 

As The Air Reservist went to pres 
the drill pay strength of the Air Fore 
Reserve had passed the 60,500 mat 
and was nudging the 61,000 drill pj 
ceiling. 

Pilot shortages predominate with 
the flying units. A CONAC study ii 
dicates that this problem will i: 
crease with an estimated shortage 
442 at the end of fiscal year 196 
551 by FY '66, and 645 in FY '6< 
Despite vigorous recruiting effort 
the output from the active force wi 
not provide the pilots needed. 
CONAC request for activation of 
special pilot training program for t 
Air Force Reserve is presently undl 
consideration. 

Externally: Reservists made n, 
merous contributions to mission <! 
complishments for the Air Force, t 




ishment. 



lajor air commands, the Department 
E Defense and, on a collateral basis, 
arious civic organizations. 

Recruiting: A novel recruiting plan 
as put into effect by Reservists of 
le First Air Force Reserve Region, 
tewart AFB, New York. They made 
Dntact with the officials of the "Wel- 
3me Wagon International" program 
nd received permission to add Re- 
;rve recruiting literature to the ma- 
:rial distributed by the "Welcome 
/agon" hostesses. 

Augmentation: Joint exercises, 
wift Strike and Coulee Crest will not 
e conducted this year due to adjust- 
lents in the Department of Defense 
■aining program. 

The Air Force Reserve played an 
ctive part in these and other joint 
•aining exercises last year. During 
'oulee Crest, the 452nd Troop Car- 
ier Wing provided ten C-l 19s, seven 
"om March AFB, California and 
iree from the wing's detachment at 
fill AFB, Utah. The Reservists flew 
ctual and simulated air evacuation, 
argo and courier missions for the 
ompeting forces of the U. S. Strike 
-ommand. Coulee Crest was the 
irgest exercise ever staged on the 
Vest Coast and took place in the vi- 



cinity of Yakima, Washington, last 
April and May. 

In augmenting the Red and Blue 
forces during Swift Strike III, Re- 
servists from 16 troop carrier groups 
flew more than 1,300 sorties, air- 
dropping 6,000 paratroops, airland- 
ing 5,000 infantrymen, and trans- 
porting over 3,000 tons of cargo. 

In a program known as CON-TAC. 
ten Air Force Reserve troop carrier 
aircraft and crews are available at all 
times for use by Tactical Air Com- 
mand and another ten for use in 
Army airborne training. During 1963, 
the CON-TAC program was respon- 
sible for the movement of some ten 
million pounds of cargo for the Air 
Force. In addition, the Air Force 
Reserve provided more than half of 
TACs support for Army Airborne 
training and air-dropped more than 
100,000 troops last year in exercises 
and training maneuvers. 

Air Force Reserve heavy troop 
carrier squadrons perform overwater 
training flights along MATS overseas 
routes in order to develop proper 
standards of operational readiness. 
When MATS cargo is carried on 
these flights, all members of the crew 
get realistic training. The extra air- 
lift which they provide for MATS is 
clear profit for the nation. 

Reserve augmentation took many 
forms. Programmed learning courses 
resulted from the efforts of four teams 
of Air Force Reserve educators. Each 
team served on active duty for 30 
days, developing the courses as part 
of a USAF nationwide study "aimed at 
finding more economical and effective 
ways of training personnel. An ex- 
ample: a six-man team met at Elling- 
ton AFB, Texas, to design a course 
on Nuclear Disaster Control. Their 
efforts produced a two volume course 
which was so successful that it is 
under study for possible use through- 
out the Air Force. 

Recovery: Individual training is 
given high priority in the Reserve Re- 
covery program. In each of the Re- 
serve's Recovery squadrons, emphasis 
is placed on acquiring first-hand prac- 
tical experience in providing emer- 
gency landing areas and facilities for 
the crews and various types aircraft of 
the Regular Forces. These squadrons 
participate in as many practice exer- 
cises as possible, and some sectors are 
conducting Recovery competitions to 
determine their most proficient units. 
During 1963 there were hundreds of 
recoveries of various type aircraft. A 
recent example: Reservists of the 
9224th Air Force Reserve Recovery 



Sq., Springfield, Ohio, joined with a 
crew of the Strategic Air Command's 
340th Bomb Wing, Bergstrom AFB, 
Texas, to accomplish a Recovery 
mission involving a SAC KC-135 
"Stratotanker." The services rendered 
the SAC crewmen by the Reservists 
included post-crash and firefighting 
protection, decontamination facilities 
for aircraft and individuals, medical 
attention and transportation of mock 
casualties, debriefing facilities, main- 
tenance equipment, and food, shelter 
and security protection during the 
period of their stay. 

Mercy Flights: Air Force Re- 
servists participated in several hu- 
manitarian airlift missions during 
1963. One of the latest involved 
the men of the 304th Troop Carrier 
Sq., Richards-Gebaur AFB, Mo. Fly- 
ing a C-l 24, the Reservists airlifted 
a 20,000 pound cargo of wheat, 
blankets and clothing to assist the 
victims of typhoon "Gloria" on the 
island of Formosa. The flight took 
the Reserve crew to Tachikawa AB, 
Japan, via California, Hawaii and 
Wake Island. At Tachikawa, the 
cargo was off-loaded for a MATS 
flight to Taiwan. The 304th is one 
of five squadrons attached to the 
442nd Troop Carrier Wing, also at 
Richards-Gebaur AFB, which aug- 
ments MATS in its global airlift. 

Flying Safety: The flying safety 
record for Air Force Reserve units 
was a low 2.5 compared with 2.9 for 
1962. In achieving this fine safety 
record, Reserve pilots and crews flew 
a total of 196,350 hours during 1963. 
The 304th Troop Carrier Squadron, 
Richards-Gebaur AFB, Missouri, be- 
came the first Military Air Transport 
Service Reserve squadron to achieve 
10 years of accident-free flying. The 
304th is one of five squadrons of the 
442nd Troop Carrier Wing assigned 
to MATS in July 1963. The squadron 
trained in four different aircraft — 
C-47, C-46, C-l 19, and C-l 24 air- 
craft — while maintaining the acci- 
dent-free record. Included in the 10 
years was a year of active duty be- 
cause of the tense Berlin situation in 
1961-62. 

The 304th is often called upon to 
perform special operations which 
have taken their crews and planes 
from Nome, Alaska to Dhahran, 
Saudi Arabia. They have ferried C- 
1 19s to India, and twice have trans- 
ported static displays to airfields in 
South America in support of inter- 
American goodwill. 

see AFRes page 10 



■ AFRes from page 9 

Projection '64: On January 7, 
1964, CONAC Commander, Lt. Gen- 
eral Edward J. Timberlake, labeled 
the year ahead a crucial one. He 
cited the necessity of an Air Force 
Reserve program which is clear, con- 
structive and based on sound require- 
ments. The general set forth six ob- 
jectives for the coming year. They 
cover a wide range of activities and 
programs, some already contem- 
plated, some which must be devel- 
oped. They are: More realistic, ac- 
ceptable and firm overall Reserve 
program; organization at every eche- 
lon for improved management, more 
efficient span of control, and higher 
productivity; maximum manning and 
retention; increased operational readi- 
ness and improved combat capability; 
highest possible level of equipage; 
and improved morale and public rec- 
ognition of all Reservists. 

According to General Timberlake, 
"... a definite correlation exists be- 
tween our own actions and the recog- 
nition we need from higher head- 
quarters in USAF and the Depart- 
ment of Defense. While we have 
made praiseworthy progress in 1963, 
I am not convinced that we have ex- 
plored and uncovered all the ways in 
which the Air Force Reserve can be 
used as an economical and effective 
backup for the active establishment. 
This is the overriding problem. 

"Our broad goal of greater ac- 
ceptance of the Air Force Reserve 
will depend in the long run on in- 
creased productivity by all concerned. 
This is the factor essential to maxi- 
mum manning and every other ele- 
ment of improved capability. The 
Reserve program is not alone here. 
Greater productivity per dollar spent 
is the current watchword of every 
command in the Air Force and of the 
entire Department of Defense. It 
must be evident in the Reserve pro- 
gram if we are to win greater accept- 
ance with the major commands and 
with Hq USAF." 

General Timberlake concluded: 
"The Secretary and Chief of Staff of 
the Air Force have said again and 
again that the Air Force Reserve to- 
day is a more integral part of the 
total Air Force than ever before. 
With this welcome beginning of rec- 
ognition comes the obligation to live 
up to it. Every member of CONAC, 
every member of the Air Force Re- 
serve must drive as hard toward 
greater productivity as any member 
of SAC or TAC or ADC or any other 
Air Force command. Then, and only 
then, will the Reserve Program come 
into its own. This, to me, is no grim, 




foreboding situation. It is a challenge 
of the times and a chance to show 
that Air Force Reservists can be as 
effective in peacetime as they are 
expected to be in war." 



H 



urricane Cindy held different 
meanings for different people along 
the Texas gulf coast last November. 
For the farmer it meant concern for 
his crops and livestock, and for the 
city-dweller it involved locking doors, 
and windows and gathering up loose 
objects. For Brigadier General Rus- 
sel F. Gustke, commander of the 
464th Troop Carrier Wing at Elling- 
ton AFB, it meant making a decision 
— a big decision. 

On a ramp outside his office sat 
35 C-119 "Flying Boxcars" — a 
quarter of a billion dollars worth of 
aircraft. Only five of those planes 
would fit in the hangar space avail- 
able to the general. A decision had 
to be made, and made quickly. 
Should he order the planes flown to 
the safety of their alternate base 
more than 500 miles away, or should 
he risk keeping them at Ellington. 

If his decision were to move the 
aircraft it meant alerting his Air 
Force Reserve aircrews, calling them 
away from their civilian responsibil- 
ities and families who also faced the 
possible devastation of "Cindy." And, 
it would be a very costly move. 

If he gambled on keeping the 
birds at Ellington and then lost, he 
would be picking up aircraft parts 
for the next six months while trying 
to explain why so much public money 
had been jeopardized. 



A good staff kept General Gustk 
well-informed. At his conferenc 
table his staff plied him with ac 
vice: weather advisories; movemei 
tables; alert rosters; maps; calcul, 
tors; performance reports; aircra 
status reports; and a host of oth« 
important information. But the fin! 
decision had to come from one mat 

General Gustke decided to gambl 
— the planes would stay. No on 
knew better than he that in effec 
he was putting his professional repi 
tation on the line. 

Once the decision had been mad 
it set in motion a number of pre 
cautionary measures. About 25 Re 
servists swarmed over the aircraf 
shutting windows, securing flight cor 
trols, being sure all electrical cii 
cuits were off, checking gasoline line 
and fillers, putting extra chocks ufl 
der wheels, and securing the aircra; 
in other ways. At the office, furnitur 
was moved away from windows 
blinds were drawn to reduce poa 
sible glass shatter, and importar 
papers put in drawers and file: 
Within a few hours the task wa 
basically completed and most person 
nel were allowed to go home. 

But, for General Gustke and a fe\ 
others of his staff it was an all-nigh 
vigil that ended with breakfast anl 
the knowledge that the worst o 
"Cindy" had come and gone anj 
the planes were safe. 

By that one decision — the righ 
one — and the hard work of a handfi 
of dedicated Air Force Reservists, 
quarter billion dollars in equipmer 
was undamaged and the Air Fore 
saved the cost of having them flowi 
to safety— more than $900,000. 



10 



CAP's Emergency Services . . . 






^ivil Air Patrol can reflect with 
-' pride upon two recent Emergen- 
y Services missions which demon- 
trated the value of this volunteer 
ivilian organization. These involved 
le commercial airline crash near Elk- 
>n, Maryland on December 8 and a 
-52 crash near Cumberland, Md., 
anuary 13. 

Some 388 CAP seniors and cadets 
articipated in the first mission in 
'hich they received acclaim for their 
ork in assisting government aviation 
gencies, commercial airlines and 
ate and local police. 

CAP members logged 4,000 man 
ours in around-the-clock operations 
t the Elkton crash scene. Its assist- 
ive was authorized by the Eastern 
iir Rescue Service and within a 
lort time CAP's Cecil County Squad- 
)n, near Elkton, was on the scene. 
his unit was the forerunner of a 
ozen Maryland Wing CAP squad- 
Mis whose members were marshaled 
lto action. Two other wings, the 
lational Capital and the Delaware 
Zing, also sent personnel and facili- 
es to the scene. 

Thus began one of the longest and 
Dldest Emergency Services missions 
■hich CAP personnel in that area 
ave experienced. 

When the mission ended nine days 
iter, CAP had marshaled 388 per- 
Dnnel, set up 5 fixed radio stations, 
ssembled 14 mobile and 2 walkie- 
llkie communication units, and in- 
ched 7 land communication lines. 

Mission coordinator, Lt. Colonel 
larence E. Michehl, Maryland Wing 
eputy for emergency services, as- 
sted by Colonel William M. Patter- 
m, wing commander, established a 
nooth functioning command post 
'hich operated on a 24-hour basis. 

Not the least of the command post 
xomplishments was the orderly or- 
anization of CAP members who ar- 
ved throughout the first night. They 
elped stamp out small fires, mounted 
jrveillance posts over scattered 
reckage and finally, helped Civil 
leronautics Board personnel pick up 
nd transport parts of the wreckage 
) Boiling AFB in Washington, D. C, 
here CAB specialists studied the 
reckage in an effort to learn the 
robable cause. 

Administratively, CAP personnel 
ho manned the command post also 
irned in an outstanding effort. 



Throughout the nine-day period, an 
average of 30 CAP personnel main- 
tained eight-hour duty shifts, night 
and day, at the scene. Rotation of 
personnel, their feeding and billeting, 
was accomplished without a hitch. 

Indicative of the efficiency of this 
element was the organization of trans- 
portation to shuttle changing shifts 
from the accident scene to the mis- 
sion command post headquarters at 
Baltimore's Friendship International 
Airport, 50 miles away. CAP buses 
brought in from Maryland units made 
the shuttle runs. 

When Civil Air Patrol was released 
from assisting at the crash scene, its 
members left with words of thanks 
and appreciation from officials of the 
Federal Aviation Agency, CAB, state 
and local police, Boeing Aircraft and 
Pan American Airways. 

And when, on Sunday, December 
16, relatives and friends of the crash 
victims assembled at the scene for a 
simple memorial service, a CAP hon- 
or guard was on hand. 

In the later mission, Maryland, 
National Capital and West Virginia 
Wings, participated in the air and 
ground search for survivors of a B-52 
jet bomber which crashed in a blind- 
ing snowstorm near Cumberland, 
Md., on January 13. 



The big Strategic Air Command 
Stratofortress was returning to its 
home base at Turner AFB, Georgia, 
when it developed trouble and its 
crew were ordered to abandon it. 
Four parachuted into the rugged 
countryside. The body of the fifth 
man was found in the wreckage. 

Once again CAP was quickly on 
the scene. It provided 12 aircraft and 
approximately 60 personnel for the 
aerial search, ground rescue and com- 
munications operations. 

Significantly, the distinction of 
sighting one of the two survivors went 
to 1st Lieutenant Earl W. Radner, a 
pilot-member of the Montgomery 
Squadron, National Capital Wing. 

The day following the accident, he 
sighted Captain Parker C. Peedin, 
the B-52's co-pilot. Lieutenant Rad- 
ner radioed for a helicopter which 
was able to land about a mile from 
the downed man. A rescue crew, 
which included CAP Captain Ron 
Cline of Silver Spring, Md., covered 
the remaining distance on foot and 
brought Captain Peedin to safety. 

Coincidently, CAP headquarters 
published the first part of a three-part 
Emergency Services Manual in Janu- 
ary. This manual will be a guide for 
CAP members to continue training 
for just such emergencies. The first 
part is devoted to CAP's Search and 
Rescue procedures and techniques. 
It will be followed shortly by a manual 
spelling out training guides for CAP- 
Civil Defense and CAP-Air Force 
Reserve Recovery Program support. 




CAP's mobile communications equipment and personnel are vital to search 
and rescue operations. Above, CAP communicators give "Emergency Service" 
assistance to state and federal authorities at air crash near Elkton, Md. 



ii 



QUESTIONS & ANSWERS 




of your AF Form 5. That commander can authorize 
flying physical and, if you arc qualified, appearance be 
a flying evaluation board. If you have trouble findin 
rated vacancy, contact the ARRC. 






I am a Reserve officer and have been gaining points 
through attendance at Reserve meetings. I have also 
been gaining points through extension courses. How 
may I become entitled to Uniform Maintenance 
Allowance? Basically, entitlement to Uniform Mainte- 
nance Allowance will exist when four years satisfactory 
service as a member of the Air Force Reserve have been 
completed and 28 days of active duty have been per- 
formed during those four years. Satisfactory service for 
Uniform Maintenance Allowance is 50 points exclusive of 
extension courses or preparation of instruction if the uni- 
form was not worn. In no cases are extension course 
points allowed for Uniform Maintenance Allowance; how- 
ever, if your unit commander certifies that the uniform 
was worn during preparation of instruction, these points 
may be included. If you have fulfilled the basic require- 
ments, submit your claim to your unit of assignment. 

/ am an Air Force officer assigned to Inactive Status 
List Reserve Section. How may I obtain an Identifica- 
tion Card? An Identification Card is not issued to a mem- 
ber (either officer or airman) of the Inactive Status List 
Reserve Section (ISLRS) or the Ineligible Reserve Sec- 
tion (IRS). For further information on Identification Cards 
we suggest you read AFR 30-20, Issue and Control of 
Identification Cards. 

/ was commissioned and went on active duty in July 
1955. After serving two years of active duty, I 
reverted to inactive Reserve July 1957. As of July 
1963, I had completed eight years of Reserve and 
active duty time. In August 1963 I was notified of a 
change in status to "Standby B." Please explain this 
status. It was my understanding that I would be dis- 
charged when I had completed my military service 
obligation. Appointments in the Air Force Reserve as 
a commissioned officer are for an indefinite period. Ful- 
fillment of th,e period of service required by law does not 
result in automatic termination of the appointment. Reserve 
officers are discharged only by a resignation submitted by 
the officer or for cause. When your obligation terminated, 
you were reassigned to Standby status and given Standby 
Screening Code B because you had completed all Ready 
Reserve requirements. You will not be involuntarily re- 
turned to Ready status. 

/ just completed a special voluntary tour of active 
duty for 22 days with my Reserve troop carrier wing 
to ferry an aircraft. Do / still have to participate in 
the annual 15-day tour of active duty for training 
conducted by the entire wing? As a member of a 
Category A unit, in training Category A, Pay Group A, 
you are required by paragraph 32-16, AFM 35-3, to 
participate in the short tour of active duty for training 
conducted by the unit of assignment. This requirement 
cannot be waived. 

/ am a rated pilot. I was suspended for physical rea- 
sons at time of my release in September 1961 . These 
physical limitations no longer exist. How do I get 
back on flying status? Contact the tactical Reserve 
unit nearest you for an assignment and furnish a copy 



At one time, I held a commission as a captain, 41 
Force Reserve. I resigned since I was unable t< 
participate in inactive duty training due to estab 
lishing myself in business. I now find that I ca 
again devote time to the Reserve Program. Can mi 
appointment be reinstated? No, a former officer ma 
neither be reappointed nor have his commission reinstate! 
based solely on prior service. Appointments may H 
tendered only in a specialty for which there is a procure 
ment quota. At the present time, such quotas exist onll 
for outstanding Reserve airmen and for persons qualifiej 
to serve in the medical, chaplain, and legal career field] 
Medical and chaplain personnel can receive appointmeri 
consideration for active or Reserve duty; legal personni 
will be considered only for appointment with concurred 
extended active duty. If you fall within one of these threj 
career fields, we suggest you contact the commander q 
the nearest Air Force Reserve organization. He will assij 
you in determining your eligibility under AFM 36-5, an<| 
if eligible, he will furnish guidance in submission of 
formal application. 



AEROSPACE LIBRARY 




Decisive Air Battles Of The First World War, Arc 

Whitehouse (Duell, Sloan and Pearce, $6.50). The stofl 
of men and machines, from the birth of airpower to thl 
mass use of bombing planes, who helped make histor 
during the first war in the air. 

A History Of Rockets And Space, Courtlandt Canbl 
(Hawthorn, $5.95). The first volume in the New Illustrate! 
Library of Science and Invention series. An illustrate* 
reference book on the history and evolution of the rocka 
and of space travel. 

Exploring The Secrets Of Space, I. M. Levitt an< 
Dandridge M. Cole (Prentice-Hall, $5.95). A presentatioi 
of a basic course in space age astronomy and physics an< 
an explanation of the roles that biology, psychology, 
medicine and other physical sciences will play in plannin; 
future space flights. 

The Week Before Pearl Harbor, A. A. Hoehling (Nor 
ton, $4.50). This account of the seven fateful days befon 
the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 194 
is based on testimony, extensive correspondence, and in 
terviews with men who were in high posts in 1941. 

The Arms Debate, Robert A. Levine (Harvard Univ 
Press, $6.50). An impartial analysis of the structure aiwj 
dynamics of the entire range of views on American milil 
tary policy. 

Primer For Revolt: The Communist Takeover in Vie 

Nam, Truong Chinh (Praeger, $5.00). A leader of the Vie : 
Minh had two books published in 1945 and 1947. One i: 
entitled The August Revolution, describing the Commit' 
nists takeover in 1945, and the other, The Resistance Wil 
Win, is an appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses of thi 
French as well as the Viet Minh. They are printed here it' 
one book. 






I 



Weekend Training Overseas 




Refueling capability of ANG taCtfeal jets makes rapid overseas deployments possible. 



:end deployments to Europe . . . 

jets! That's the horizon Air Na- 
nal Guardsmen are about ready to 
lquer. To date, such overwater 
>sions were the sole province of 

transports, but now it appears 
y will have to share the spotlight. 
The Air Guard's Military Air 
insport Service mission is an old 
ry. Its big, four-engine C-97 
atofreighters and C-121 Super 
nstellations have been hauling vital 
itary cargo to Europe and the Far 
»t with the regularity of a milk 
I But now the Tactical Air Com- 
nd fighter and reconnaissance 
)ts are getting into the act and 
ore long, they will be crossing the 
antic for weekend exercises, 
"or the present, however, it's over- 
ter hops to Puerto Rico and Ber- 
da — brushing up on complex navi- 
ional procedures and improving 
light refueling techniques. All this 
resents a giant step forward in the 
Guard's operational readiness, 
1 the Air Force is looking on with 
n interest. 

Actually, this sudden burst of ac- 
ty is a logical outgrowth of the 

Guard's spectacular performance 
:k in the fall of 1961, during the 
iin crisis. At that time, Air 
ardsmen made history (and con- 
nded the Soviets in the process) 

flying 216 single-engine jets to 
'opean bases without incident and 

flying missions as soon as they 
ived. And they did all this within 

days of call-up. This was the 
>est overseas aircraft deployment 
:e World War II. 
fhe Guardsmen are proud of this. 



but they know they will have to im- 
prove if there is another mobilization. 

The Berlin deployment was an 
island-hopping operation. Now the 
Guard has a refueling capability — 
its own tankers to do the job — and 
the next time they're going non-stop. 

The other big difference is that 
when the crisis erupted in 1961, most 
of the pilots were shy on overwater 
navigational and emergency training. 
The activity after the call was fren- 
zied. Now they're getting to be pros 
at it in a training status. 

The transformation began inau- 
spiciously, with training in air refuel- 
ing. But the pilots mastered this tech- 
nique and soon were deploying non- 
stop to summer field training sites, 
refueling along the way. After that, 
the real test began. 

The first major deployment came 
on March 22, 1963 when ten RF 84Fs 
from Alabama's 117th TacReconGp. 
flew from Birmingham to Ramey 
AFB Puerto Rico and returned two 
days later. Last September, this same 
outfit flew 3,500 miles non-stop to 
Alaska's Elmendorf AFB to take 
some reconnaissance photos for the 
Alaskan Command. (See Nov. '63 
issue of The Air Reservist.) These 
were the real ground breakers. 

Then, two months later — on No- 
vember 22 — twelve F-lOOs from the 
District of Columbia's 1 13th Tactical 
Fighter Group, joined by six more 
F-lOOs from St. Louis' 131st Tactical 
Fighter Group, streaked from An- 
drews AFB, Md., to Ramey AFB, 
Puerto Rico, in four hours and twen- 
ty minutes, refueling twice along the 
way and landing in a blinding storm 



on schedule. This was a history-mak- 
ing event, since it represented the 
first non-stop over-water deployment 
of ANG supersonic jets. 

For this deployment, General Wal- 
ter C. Sweeney Jr., TAC commander, 
had the following praise: "The execu- 
tion of this mission in such an ex- 
emplary manner conclusively demon- 
strates the professional competence 
of all participants. I recognize the 
detailed planning and high degree of 
supervision required to accomplish a 
movement of this type." 

And then, on the following week- 
end, the Air Guard further refined 
its deployment plans when the 140th 
Tactical Fighter Group of Denver — 
also flying F-lOOs — deployed 2,600 
miles to Roosevelt Roads, Puerto 
Rico and spent an extra day at the 
base conducting aerial gunnery prac- 
tice. That weekend, RF-84Fs from 
the 186th Tactical Recon. Gp., Meri- 
dian, Mississippi, joined the Denver 
Guardsmen and spent a day taking 
pictures of designated targets. 

Air National Guard's primary 
goals are a well-manned, well- 
equipped, flexible fighting force that 
is ready and capable of contributing 
significantly to the defense require- 
ments of the nation. Long-range jet 
deployments are a major step in the 
direction of achieving those goals. 
But they are just the beginning for the 
tactical outfits. Their successful com- 
pletion of the Alaska and Puerto 
Rico deployments should provide the 
experience and incentive to make 
weekend deployments to Europe a 
reality in the near future. 



13 



Last month this column carried officer vacancies within Tactical Air Com- 
mand. The following are enlisted vacancies existing {or Part I Mobiliza- 
tion Assignees within specified AFSCs at TAC bases. Postions offer 24 
inactive duty training periods, pay based on category assigned, a 15-day 
active duty tour annually, retirement points, and possible promotion. 
Training is. performed with active duty unit to which assigned. Appli- 
cants should correspond directly with unit of choice, giving full name, 
address, grade and AFSC. 






ARIZONA 
Luke AFB, 4510 Combat Crew 
Training' Wing, 403X0, E-4 (1); 
471X0, E-7 (1), E-5 (2); 471X1, E-5 
(2); 537X0, E-6 (.1), E-5 (1); 533X0, 
E-5 (1); 542X0Z, E-7 (1), E-5 (4); 
543X0, E-7 (1). E-5 (4); 545X0, E-6 
(1), E-5 (2); 546X0W, E-6 (1), E-5 
(1); 551X0. E-7 (l)„E-5 (3); 551X1, 
E-5 (8); 5S2X0. E-5, (4): 563X0, E-7 
(1). E-5 (3); 564X02; E-7 (1), E-5 
(2); 565X0, E-7 (1), E-5 (4); 621X0, 
E-5 (1), E-4 (1); 622X0, E-7 (1), 
E-6 (2), E-5 (14). E-4 (24); 622X1, 
E-6- (1), E-5 (1); 623X0, E-4 (1); 
646X0, E-5 (1), E-4 (1); 671X0, E-6 
(1); 671X3, E-4 (1); 701X0, E-5 (1), 
E-4 (1); 702X0, E-4 (2); 704X0, E-4 
(8); 732X0B, E-6 (2), E-5 (2), E-4 
(3); 771X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (18), E-4 
(17); 902X0B, E-8 (3), E-7 (4), E-6 
(11), E-5 (18), E-4 (82); 902X2, E-5 
(3), E^t(2); 902X4, E-6 (1), E-4 
(2); 9O4X0A, E-5 (1), E-4 (3); 905X0, 
E-5 (1), E-4 (2); 906X0, E-6 (2), 
E-5 (3), E-4 (8); 906X1, E-5 (1), 
E-4 (2); 907X0, E-5 (1), E-4 (2); 
908X0, E-5 (1), E-4 (2); 981X0, 
E-4 (6). 



CALIFORNIA 
George AFB, 831 Air Division, 
271X0, E-7 - (1); 423X3C, E-5 (2), 
E-4 (2); 431X1A, E-7 (5), E-6 (3), 
E-5 (2)^ E-4 (3); 431X1C, E-7 (3), 
E-6 (14), E-5 (8), E-4 (6); 432X0, 
E-6 (4),' E-5 (8); 432X1, E-4 (2); 
461X0, E-4 (1); 471X0, E-7 (2), E-5 
(2); 471X1, E-5 (4), E-4 (3); 471X2, 
E-5 (1); - 532X0, E-6. (1), E-5 (1); 
533X0, E-5 (1); 542X0Z, E-7 (1), 
E-5 (4); 543X0, E-7 (2), E-5 (8); 
545X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (2): 546X0W, 
E-6 (1),. E-5 (1); 55iX0, E-7 (1), E-5 
(3); 551X1, E-5 (S)j 552X0, E-5 (4); 
563X0. E-7 (1), E-5 (3); 564X0Z, 
E-7 (1), E-5 (2); 565X0, E-7 (1), 
E-5 (4); 602X1, E-5 (1); 603X0 A, E-5 
(4), E-4 (4); 603X1, E-5 (1); 605X0, 
E-5 (3); 605X1, E-5 (1), E-4 (2); 
621X0. E-4 (2); 622X0. E-6 (1), E-5 
(7). E-4 ..(17); 623X0. E-4 (1); 
643X0A, E-6 (2), E-5 (2), E-4 (8); 
645X0, E-4 (4); 646X0. E-5 (3), E-4 
(5); 647X0,, E-5 (2), E-4 (5); 651X0, 
E-6 (1), E-5 (1); 671X0, E-6 (2); 
671X1, E-5 (2), E-4 (1); 671X3, 
E-5 (2), E-4 (1); 685X0A, E-4 (2); 
701X0, E-5 (1), E-4 (1); 702X0, E-6 
(1), E-5 (2), E-4 (4); 704X0, E-8 
(1), E-5 .(4), E-4 (5); 732X0B, E-5 
(3), E-4 (5); 771X0. E-7 (2), E-6 (2), 
E-5 (13), E-4 (24); 771X1, E-6 (1), 
E-5 (1); 901X0, E-6 (1); 902X0B, E-7 
(2), E-* (2), E-4 (2); 902X2, E-5 
(3), E-4 (2); 902X0B, E-4 (1); 90290, 
E-8 (lj; 905X0, E-4 (1); 906X0, 
E-5 (1), E-4 (1); 906X1, E-7 (1), 
E-5 (1), E-4 (1). 



FLORIDA 

Homestead AFB, 31 Tactical Ftr. 
Wing, 301X0, E-4 (1); 423X3C, E-5 
(1), E-4 (1); 431X1C, E-7 (1), E-6 
(2), E-5 (3). E-4 (3); 432X0, E-6 
(2), E-5 (4); 543X0. E-5 (2); 646X0, 
E-4 (2); 702X0, E-4 (1). 

MacUill AFB, 836 Air Division, 
271X0, E-7 (1), E-4 (1); 301X0, E-4 
(1): 423X3C, E-5 (1>, E-4 (1), 422X0, 
E-7 (1), E-5 (2); 431XIA, E-6 (2), 
E-5 Hi. E-4 (',), 41IX1C. E-7 (5), 
E-6 (10), E-5 (2), E-4' (3); 432X0; 
E-6 (2). E-5 (4;; 432X1, F-4 (2); 
471X0. E-6 (I), E-4 (2). 471X1, 
E-5 <2>. E-4 '5 ( ; 471X2. E-4 (1); 
461X0. E-4 (2); 531X0, I i (IV 
563X0. E-4 (2); 571X0, E-4 (1); 
602X0. E-6 (lj; 602X1, 1.-4 (1); 
603XOA, E-4 (3); 603X1, E-5 (1); 

14 



605X0, E-4 (1); 621X0, E-5 (2), E-4 
(2); 622X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (5), E-4 (5); 
623X0, E-4 (1); 643X0A, E-6 (1). 
E-5 (2), E-4 (7); 645X0, E-7 (1), 
E-6 (3), E-5 (2), E-4 (5); 646X0, 
E-5 (6), E-4 (5); 64,7X0, E-6 (2), 
E-5 (3), E-4 (5); 647X1, E-6 (1); 
651X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (1); 671X0, E-6 
(2), E-4 (1); 671X1', E-5 (2), E-4 
(1); 671X3, E-5 (2), E-4 (1); 
685X0A, E-4 (2); 701X0, E-5 (1), 
E-4 (1); 702X0, E-5 (3), E-4 (4); 
732X0B, E-6 (1), E-5 (3), E-4 (3); 
771X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (3), E-4 (11); 
922X0A, E-4 (1). 



KANSAS 
McConnell AFB, 388 Tactical Ftr. 

Wg., 403X0, E-4 (1)- K 423X3C, E-5 
(1), E-4 (1); 431X1A, E-6 (2), E-5 
(4), E-4 (2); 431X1C, E-7 (5), E-6 
(10), E-5 (3) E-4 (1); 432X0, E-6 
(2), E-5 (4); 432X1, E-4 (2); 543X0, 
E-7 (D.E-5 (2); 603XOA, E-4 (3); 
646X0, E-5 (2),. E-4 (1); 702X0, E-5 
(2), E-4 (1); 902X4, E-4 (1); 904X0, 
E-6 (1), E-5 (1), E-4 (1). 



LOUISIANA 
England AFBj.' 401 Tactical Ftr. 
Wg., 301X0, E-4- (i); 423X3C, E-5 
(1), E-4 (1);. 431X1A, E-6 (1); 
431X1C, E-6 (2), E-5 (3), E-4 (2); 
432X0, E-6 (2), E-5 (3); 461X0, E-4 
(2); 471X0, E-7 (1), E-5 (6), E-4 
(2); 471X1, E-5 (4), E-4 (9); 471X2, 
E-5 (1), E-4 (1);. 531X0, E-4 (1); 
532X0, E-6 (l),E-5 (1); 533X0, E-5 
(1); 542X0Z, E-7 (1),': E-5 (4); 543X0, 
E-7 (1), E-5 (6);. 545X0, E-6 (1), E-5 
(2); 546X0W, E^6 . (1), E-5 (1); 
551X0, E-7 (l),;:E-5 (3); 551X1, E-5 
(8); 552X0, E-5 (4); -563X0, E-7 (1), 
E-5 (3); 564X0Z. E-7 (1), E-5 (2); 
565X0, E-7 (1), E-5 (4); 602X0, E-6 
(1); 6O3X0A, E-5 ,(3), E-4 (7); 603X1, 
E-5 (1); 621X0, E-5 (2), E-4 (1); 
622X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (4), E-4 (5); 
623X0, E-4 (1); 643X0A, E-6 (1), 
E-5 (2), E-4 (7); 645X0. E-7 (1), 
E-6 (3), E-5 (3), E-4 (5); 646X0, 
E-5 (2), E-4 (2); 647X0, E-6 (2), 
E-5 (3), E-4 (4); 647X1, E-6 (1); 
651X0, E-6 (1), E-5,(l); 671X0, E-6 
(1); 671X3, E-5 1 (2),. E-4 (2); 671X1, 
E-5 (2), E-4 (l)';-685XOA, E-4 (2); 
701X0, E-5 (1), E-4 (1); 702X0, E-4 
(3); 704X0, E-8 (1); 721X0, E-4 (1); 
732XOB, E-6 (X&VE-5 (3), E-4 (3); 
753X0, E-4 (1); 771X0, E-7 (1), E-6 
(2), E-5 (13), E-4 (23); 771X1. E-6 (1). 
E-5 (1); 901X0, E-6 (2), E-5 (1); 
902X0B V E-7 (1), E-6 (2), E-5 (5). 



NEVADA 
Nellis AFB, 4520 Combat Crew 
Training Wg., '271X0, E-5 (1); 
461X1,' E-6 (1), E-5 (1); 701X0, E-5 
(1), E-4 (1); 771X0, E-7 (1), E-6 (3), 
E-5 (6), E-4 (16); 901X0, E-6 (1); 
902X0B, E-7 (3), E-6 (5), E-5 (6), 
E-4 (1); 902X2, E-5 (1); 904X0B, 
E-5 (1); 906X0, E-6 (2), E-5 (3); 
906X1, E-6 (1); 981X0, E-5 (3). 
E-4 (1). 



NEW MEXICO 
Cannon AFB, 832 Air Division, 

01090, E-7 (1); 271X0, E-7 (1); 
301X0, E-4 (2); 403X0, E-4 (1); 
423X3C, E-5 (2), E-4 (2); 431X1A, 
E-6 (1). niXIC, E-7 (4), E-6 (6), 
E-5 (8), E-4 (6); 432X0, E-6 (4), 
E-5 (8); 461X0, E-4 (1); 471X0, E-7 
5 (2); 471X1, E-5 (4), £-4 
(3); 471X2, E-5 (I); 532X0, E-6 (1), 



LEGEND: For officer grade identification: 0-5 stands for Lt Col.; 
0-4, Maj.; 0-3, Capt.; 0-2, 1st Lt. Where openings exist in th# 
same Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) for more than one grade, i 
the lowest and highest grades are indicated. Example: 0-2 5 meant | 
there are openings for grades first lieutenant through lieutenant 
colonel. Enlisted: The AFSC identifies the job title. The letter "X"| 
in AFSC (646X0) indicates openings in more than one grade E-2 j 
indicates Airman Third Class; E-3, A2C; E-4, A1C; E-5, SSgt; E-6, 
TSgt; E-7, MSgt, E-8, SMSgt; and E-9, CMSgt. Example: 622X0, 
E-3'7 indicates openings for airmen second class to master sergeant| 
in the Food Services Career Field. 



E-5 (1); 533X0, E-5 (1): 542X0Z, E-7 
(1), E-5 (5); 543X0. E-7 (1), E-5 
(8); 545X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (2); 
546X0W, E-6 (2), E-5 (1); 551X0, 
E-7 (1), E-5 (3); 551X1, E-5 (7); 
552X0, E-5 (6); 563X0, E-7 (1), 
E-5 (3), E-4 (2); 564X0Z, E-7 (1). E-5 
(2); 565X0, E-7 (1), E-5 (5); 571X0, 
E-6 (1), E-5 (2), E-4 (4); 582X0, 
E-5 (1); 602X1, E-5 (1); 603X0A, E-5 
(2), E-4 (8); 603X1, E-5 (1); 605X0, 
E-5 (3); 621X0, E-4 (2); 622X0, E-6 
(1), E-5 (14), E-4 (5); 623X0, E-4 
(1); 643X0A, E-6 (2). E-5 (2), E-4 
(8); 645X0, E-4 (4); 646X0, E-5 (1), 
E-4 (7); 647X0. E-5 (2), E-4 (5); 
651X0, E-6 (1). E-5 (1); 671X0, E-6 
(2); 671X1, E-5 (3), E-4 (1); 671X3, 
E-5 (2), E-4 (2); 685X0A, E-4 (2); 
701X0, E-4 (1); 702X0, E-4 (5); 
704X0. E-5 (3), E-4 (2); 732X0B, 
E-6 (1), E-5 (3), E-4 (3); 771X0, 
E-7 (2), E-6 (2), E-5 (13), E-4 (24); 
771X1, E-6 (1), E-5 (1); 901X0, E-7 
(1); 902X0B, E-7 (2), E-6 (2). E-5 
(2), E-4 (5); 902X2, E-5 (1), E-4 
(3); 902X4, E-5 (1), E-4 (2); 904X0, 
E-5 (1), E-4 (2); 905X0, E-4 (1); 
906X0, E-5 (1), E-4 (2); 906X1, E-7 
(1), E-4 (1). 

Holloman AFB, 366 Tactical Ftr. 
Wg., 301X0, E-4 (1); 423X3C, E-5 
(1). E-4 (1); 431X1A, E-6 (2), E-5 
(2), E-4 (3); 431X1C, E-7 (5), E-6 
(10), E-5 (3), E-4 (3); 432X0, E-6 
(2), E-5 (4); 432X1, E-4 (2); 543X0, 
E-7 (1), E-5 (2); 702X0, E-5 (2), 
E-4 (1). 



NORTH CAROLINA 
Pope AFB, 464 Troop Carrier 

Wg.. 271X0, E-7 (1); 222X0. E-5 
(1); 421X3, E-5 (1); 431X1A, E-5 
(29), E-4 (14); 432X1. E-4 (5); 
461X0, E-4 (2); 471X0, E-7 (1), E-5 
(2). E-4 (2); 471X1. E-5 (4), E-4 (5); 
471X3, E-4 (1); 531X0, E-4 (1); 
532X0, E-7 (2); 534X0, E-4 (1); 
542X0Z, E-5 (1), E-4 (1); 546X0W, 
E-5 (1); 551X0, E-5 (1); 551X1, 
E-5 (2); 552X0, E-5 (1); 552X1, E-4 
(1); 563X0. E-4 (2); 564X0Z, E-4 
(2); 565X0, E-5 (1), E-4 (1); 571X0, 
E-6 (1), E-5 (1), E-4 (4); 603X0A, 
E-5 (1), E-4 (7); 621X0, E-5 (2), 
E-4 (2); 622X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (5); 
E-4 (5); 623X0, E-4 (1); 643X0A, 
E-6 (1), E-5 (1). E-4 (7); 645X0, 
E-7 (1), E-6 (3), E-5 (1), E-4 (5): 
646X0, E-4 (1); 647X0, E-6 (2), 
E-5 (3), E-4 (2); 647X1, E-6 (1); 
651X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (1); 671X1. 
E-5 (2), E-4 (1); 671X3, E-5 (2); 
671X0, E-6 (2); 685XOA, E-4 (2); 
701X0, E-4 (1); 702X0, E-4 (2); 
732X0B, E-5 (2), E-4 (1); 753X0, 
E-4 (1); 771X0, E-7 (1), E-6 (2), E-5 
(8). E-4 (23); 906X0, E-4 (1). 

Seymour-Johnson AFB, 4 Tactical 
Ftr. Wg., 431X1C, E-6 (1), E-5 (2). 
E-4 (1); 432X0. E-5 (4); 471X0, E-7 
(1). E-5 (1); 471X1, E-5 (2); 532X0, 
E-6 (1), E-5 (1); 533X0, E-5 (1); 
542X0Z, E-7 (1). E-5 (3); 543X0. 
E-7 (1), E-5 (6); 545X0, E-6 (1), E-5 
(2); 546X0W, E-6 (1). E-5 (1); 
551X0, E-7 (1). E-5 (3); 551X1, E-5 
(8); 552X0, E-5 (3); 563X0, E-7 (1), 
E-5 (3); 564X0Z, E-7 (1). E-5 (2); 
565X0. E-7 (1). E-5 (4); 646X0, E-5 
(1); 701X0. E-5 (1), E-4 (1); 732X0B. 
E-6 (1); 902X2, E-5 (1); 902X4, E-5 
(1); 981X0, E-6 (1), E-4 (2). 



SOUTH CAROLINA 
Myrtle Beach AFB, 354 Tactical 
Ftr. Wg., 204X0, E-6 (1); E-5 (1), 
E-4 (1); 232X0, E-4 (2); 271X0, E-7 
(2), E-5 (1); 301X0, E-4 (1); 
423X3C, E-4 (1); 431X1A, E-6 (1); 
431X1C, E-7 (1), E-6 (1), E-5 (3), 
E-4 (3); 432X0, E-5 (3); 461X0, 



E-4 (2); 462X0, E-4 (1); 47: 
(2), E-5 (4), E-4 (2); 471X1, 
E-4 (13); 471X2, E-5 (I, 
E-4 (1); 531X0, E-5 (1); 53. 
(1), E-5 (1); 533X0, E-5 (1); 
E-7 (1), E-5 (4); 543X0, 1 
E-5 (6); 545X0, E-5 (2); : 
E-6 (1). E-5 (1); 551X0. E-7 
(3): 551X1, E-5 (8): 552X0. I 
563X0, E-7 (1), E-5 (3); 564X / E 
(1), E-5 (2); 565X0, E-7 (1), I 
602X0, E-6 (1); 6O3X0A. E-5 fc 

(8); 603X1, E-5 (1); 621X0, E-5 C 
E-4 (2); 622X0, E-6 (1), E-5 h 

(5); 623X0, E-4 (1); 643X0A, E-6* 
E-5 (2), E-4 (8); 645X0. E-7 
(3), E-5 (3), E-4 (5); 646X0, E-5 ( 
E-4 (5); 647X0, E-6 (2), E-5 
(5); 647X1, E-6 (1); 651X0, E-6 ( 
E-5 (1); 671X0, E-6 (1), E-5 C 
671X1, E-4 (1); 671X3. E-5 
(1); 685XOA, E-4 (2); 701X0, E-5 ( 
E-4 (1); 732XOB, E-6 (1). 
771X0, E-7 (1), E-5 (12), E-4 (fi 
771X1, E-6 (1), E-5 (1); 702X0, E 
(5); 704X0, E-5 (I); 902X0B, E-6 C 
E-5 (2); 902X2, E-4 (1); 903X0. E 
(2); 904X0B, E-5 (1); 905X0, E-5 (1 
906X0, E-7 (1), E-4 (3); 907X0, E 
(1); 908X0, E-7 (1), E-5 (1); 981X 
E-4 (2). 

Shaw AFB, Hq 9 AF and 837 
Combat Support Gp., 204X0, E 
(1), E-7 (2), E-6 (5), E-5 (7), E-4 C 
206X0, E-5 (2), E-4 (1); 223X0. E 
(1), E-4 (2); 271X0, E-6 (1); 323> 
E-9 (1); 403X0. E-4 (1); 421X3, E 
(2); 431X0. E-9 (2), E-8 (1); 432* 
E-5 (8); 434X0, E-9 (1), E-8 (: 
462X0, E-7 (1), E-4 (1); 605X0, E 
(1); 622X0. E-7 (1), E-5 (2), E-4 (< 
622X1, E-5 (2); 645X0, E-6 (: 
646X0. E-7 (2), E-5 (5); 647X1. E 
(1); 671X0, E-7 (2), E-6 (4); 68 1* 
E-7 (1), E-5 (2): 683X0, E-7 ( 
685X0A, E-5 (1); 701X0, E-7 (1), E 
(1), E-5 (1), E-4 (1); 702X0, E-7 ( 
E-5 (3), E-4 (9); 704X0, E-5 (' 
705X0, E-5 (9); 721X0, E-6 (. 
771X0, E-6 (1); 901X0. E-4 (. 
902X0. E-8 (3); 904X0B, E-5 C 
905X0, E-5 (1); 906X0, E-9 (1), E 
(1), E-5 (3), E-4 (3); 906X1, E-8 ( 
E-5 (1), E-4 (2); 907X0, E-5 ( 
981X0, E-4 (2); 902X0B, E-6 (1), E 
(3), E-4 (10); 902X2, E-5 (1), E 
(2); 903X0, E-7 (1). 



TENNESSEE 
Sew art AFB, 839 Air Divisic 
232X0. E-5 (1); 301X0, E-6 (1), E 
(6), E-4 (8); 304X4, E-4 (1); 421> 
E-5 (3), E-4 (3); 421X2, E-5 C 
422X0, E-5 (2); 422X1. E-4 (< 
431X1E, E-5 (11), E-4 (36); 432> 
E-5 (5), E-4 (7); 442X0. E-5 ( 
471X1, E-7 (1); 471X1, E-5 C 
534X0. E-4 (1); 542X0Z, E-4 (. 
543X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (1); 547X0, E 
(1); 546X0W, E-4 (1); 551X0, E 
(1), E-5 (1); 551X2, E-4 (2); 552> 
E-3 (1); 552X0, E-4 (2); 563X0, E 
(1); 571X0, E-5 (3), E-4 (1), E-3 ( 
581X0. E-5 (1); 603XOA, E-4 (4), I 
(2); 622X0, E-4 (1); 645X0, E-6 ( 
E-5 (2), E-4 (5); 646X0, E-5 ' 
E-4 (6); 647X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (1), _ 
(4); 651X0, E-7 (1); 671X0, I 
(1), E-6 (1); 671X3, E-4 (3); 681> 
E-4 (1); 685X0A. E-6 (1), E-5 (1 
701X0, E-4 (1); 702X0, E-6 (1), I 
(4). E-4 (7); 721X0, E-6 (1); 723X0 
E-8 (1), E-7 (2), E-6 (2). E-5 (1 
741X1, E-4 (1); 751X0, E-6 (1), I 
(1); 771X0, E-6 (2), E-5 (1), I 
(5); 901X0. E-5 (4); 902X0B, I 
(2), E-6 (4), E-5 (9), E-4 (15 
902X2, E-5 (3), E-4 (2); 903X0,1 
(2); 904X0 A, E-5 (2); 905X0, I 
(2); 906X0, E-5 (3), E-4 (< 
906X1. E-5 (2), E-4 (1); 907> 
E-6 (1), E-5 (1), E-4 (I); 908X0, I 
(1), E-5 (2); 981X0, E-5 (1). E-4 ( 
982X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (1). 



TEXAS 

Dyess AFB, 516 Troop Carrier 

, 301X0, E-6 (2). E-5 (6), E-4 

304X4, E-4 (1); 421X1, E-5 (3), 
^ (3); 421X2. E-5 (3); 422X0, E-5 
422X1, E-4 (5); 431X1E. E-5 
). E-4 (36); 432X0. E-5 (5), E-4 
; 534X0, E-4 (1); 581X0, E-5 (1). 
'aines Connally AFB, Hq 12 Air 
rce, 204X0, E-7 (1). E-6 (2), E-5 

206X0. E-5 (1); 223X0. E-5 (1); 
1X0. E-6 (1); 431X1C, E-6 (1); 
tXO, E-9 (1): 605X0, E-6 (2); 
XO, E-7 (1); 646X0, E-6 (1); 
iXO, E-6 (1); 701X0. E-7 (1). E-6 

702X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (2), E-4 (7); 
XO, E-5 (4); 711X0, E-6 (1), E-4 

721X0, E-6 (2), E-5 (1). 



VIRGINIA 
^uigley AFB, Hq Tactical Air Co- 
nd and 4500 Air Base Wg., 
IXO, E-7 (3). E-6 (5), E-5 (5); 
XO, E-7 (1). E-6 (1): 223X1, E-4 
: 232X0, E-6 (1); 301X0, E-6 (2), 
(6), E-4 (9); 304X4. E-4 (1); 
XI, E-5 (3), E-4 (3); 421X2, E-5 
422XO, E-5 (2); 422X1, E-4 (6); 
X1E, E-5 (10), E-4 (36): 432X0. 
(5), E-4 (6); 403X0. E-5 (2); 
XO, E-7 (1), E-5 (2); 471X1, E-5 



(2); 532X0, E-6 (1). E-5 (1): 533X0, 
E-5 (1); 534X0, E-4 (1); 542X0Z, 
E-7 (1), E-5 (4); 543X0. E-7 (1), E-5 
(4); 545X0. E-6 (1), E-5 (2); 
546X0W, E-6 (1). E-5 (1); 551X0, 
E-7 (1), E-5 (3); 551X1. E-5 (8); 
552X0, E-5 (4); 563X0, E-7 (1). E-5 
(3); 564X0Z, E-7 (1), E-5 (2); 565X0. 
E-7 (1), E-5 (4); 581X0. E-5 (1); 
621X0. E-5 (1); 622X0, E-5 (4). E-4 
(12); 622X1, E-7 (1), E-5 (3); 623X0, 
E-5 (1); 645X0, E-5 (2); 671X0, E-7 
(2). E-6 (1); 683X0, E-7 (1), E-6 (1); 
685X0A/B, E-7 (1), E-5 (3), E-4 (1); 
701X0, E-7 (1), E-6 (1), E-5 (1), E-4 
(1); 702X0, E-7 (4), E-6 (7), E-5 (21), 
E-4 (21); 704X0. E-5 (10); 705X0, 
E-6 (1); 711X0, E-5 (3); 721X0, E-6 
(2), E-5 (2), E-4 (2); 732X0B. E-9 
(1), E-8 (1), E-7 (5). E-6 (6). E-5 
(12), E-4 (3); 732X1, E-7 (1), E-5 
(1); 901X0, E-6 (2), E-5 (2), E-4 (3); 
901X2, E-5 (2), E-4 (3); 902X0B, ET-7 
(3), E-6 (6), E-5 (21), E-4 (48); 
902X0. E-8 (1); 902X2, E-5 (2), E-4 
(6); 902X4. E-5 (1); 902X7, E-5 (1); 
E-4 (1); 903X0, E-5 (2), E-4 (3); 
904XOB. E-5 (2), E-4 (5); 904X0, 
E-8 (1); 905X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (2), E-4 
(2); 906X0, E-9 (1), E-8 (1), E-7 (1), 
E-5 (7), E-4 (10); 906X1, E-7 (2); 
907X0, E-6 (1), E-5 (2); 908X0, E-7 
(1), E-4 (1); 981X0, E-5 (2), E-4 (2); 
982X0, E-4 (1). 



following vacancies and AFSC descriptions exist at CONAC Medical 
ts. Positions offer up to 48 paid drills, a 15-day tour of active duty 
lually, retirement points, and possible promotion. Applicants should 
te to unit of choice, giving full name, address, grade and AFSC. 







OFFICERS 




16 

25 
35 
16 


Medical Admin. 
Staff 

Medical Admin. 
Medical Supply 
Medical Staff 


9326 
9716 
9754 
9826 
9926 

ENLISTED 


Medical (General) 
Nurse (Admin.) 
Nurse (General) 
Dental (General) 
Veterinary (Gen.) 



)90 
2X0Z 
2X0 
02XOB 
2X0B 
2X2 
2X7 
258 
3X0 
JXOB 
5X0 
5X0 
SX1 
7X0 
sXO 
XO 

txo 



First Sergeant 

Electrician/Electrical Tech (Other) 

Cook 

Medical Service Spec/Tech (Other) (Air) 

Medical Service Spec/Tech (Other) 

Operating Room Spec/Tech 

Psychiatric Clinic Spec/Supv 

Psychiatric Ward Spec 

Radiology Spec/Tech 

Medical Laboratory Spec/Tech (Other) 

Pharmacy Spec/Tech 

Medical Administrative Spec/Supv 

Medical Materiel Spec/Supv 

Preventive Medicine Spec/Tech 

Veterinary Spec/Tech 

Dental Spec/Tech 

Dental Laboratory Spec/Tech 



ALABAMA 
lates Fid., 35 Aeromed Evac. Sq. 
cer: 9025, 0-2/3 (1); 9754, 0-2/3 
Enlisted: A902X0B, E-3/7 (10). 



ARIZONA 

uke AFB, 41 Casualty Staging 

Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (5); 9326, 

./3 (4); 9754, 0-2/3 (15). Enlisted: 

X0B, E-3/8 (70); 905X0, E-5/7 

906X0, E-4/7 (3). 



CALIFORNIA 
lather AFB, 3 Aeromedical Evac. 

Officer: 9035, 0-4 (1). Enlisted: 
)2X0B, E-6/9 (3). 
1 Aeromedical Evac. Sq. Officer: 
5, 0-2/3 (3); 9754, 0-2/3 (10). 
isted: A902XOB, E-4/7 (15). 
an Diego, 42 Casualty Staging 

Officer: 9025 0-2/3 (2); 9326 
/3 (1); 9754, 0-2/3 (8). Enlisted 
X0B, E-3/8 (19); 90570, E-7 (1) 
XI, E-4/6 (2). 



San Jose, 44 Casualty Staging Sq. 
Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (2); 9754, 0-2/3 
(9). Enlisted: 902XOB, E-3/9 (24); 
90258, E-4/5 (3). 

March AFB, 616 USAF Hospital. 
Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (4); 9326, 0-2/5 
(20); 9716, 0-4/5 (2); 9754, 0-2/3 
(101). Enlisted: 542X0Z, E-4/6 (7); 
622X0, E-3/5 (26); 902X0B, E-3/8 
(82); 902X8, E-3/5 (11); 904X0B, E- 
4/9 (5); 906X0, E-4/6 (4). 

Hamilton AFB, 631 USAF Hos- 
pital. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (5); 9326, 
0-2/4 (24); 9754, 0-2/4 (107). En- 
listed: 902X0B, E-3/9 (68); 902X2, 
E-3/5 (12); 90277, E-6/7 (7); 902X8, 
E-3/5 (15); 903X0, E-3/7 (5); 904X0, 
E-3/9 (12); 906X0, E-3/9 (13); 
906X1, E-3/7 (8); 907X0, E-5/8 (2); 
981X0, E-3/7 (5). 



COLORADO 

Denver, 31 Casualty Staging Sq. 
Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (1); 9326, 0-2/3 
(2); 9754, 0-2/3 (10). Enlisted: 
902X0B, E-4/6 (18); 90450B, E-5 (1); 
905X0, E-5/7 (2). 



FLORIDA 

Miami. 37 Aeromedical Evac. Sq. 
Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (2); 9035, 0-2/3 
(1); 9754, 0-2/3 (23). Enlisted: 
A902X0B. E-4/8 (24). 

MacDill AFB, 620 USAF Hos- 
pital. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (4); 9326, 
0-2/3 (15); 9754, 0-2/3 (23); 9926, 
0-3 (1). Enlisted: 902X0B, E-3/8 
(21); 903X0, E-3/6 (3); 904X0B, 
E-4/7 (6); 905X0, E-5/7 (2). 



ILLINOIS 

Chanute AFB, 46 Aeromedical 
Evac. Sq. Officer: 9035, 0-3 (1); 
9754. 0-2/3 (9). Enlisted: A902X0B, 
E-6 (5). 

Scott AFB, 52 Casualty Staging 
Sq. Officer: 9326, 0-2/3 (1); 9754, 
0-2/3 (27). Enlisted: 902X0B, E-4/8 
(10). 

O'Hare IAP, 640 USAF Hospital. 
Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (5); 9326, 0-2/4 
(14); 9754, 0-2/4 (105); 9926, 0-2/3 
(1). Enlisted: 902X0B, E-3/9 (44); 
902X7, E-5/7 (7); 904XOB, E-5/9 (6); 
906X1, E-3/7 (4). 



INDIANA 
Ft. Benj. Harrison, 625 USAF 
Hospital. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (6); 
9326, 0-2/4 (6); 9754, 0-2/3 (35); 
9826, 0-2/3 (1). Enlisted: 902X0B, 
E-3/8 (17); 902X2, E-3/5 (6); 
904X0B, E-5/7 (7). 



LOUISIANA 

Barksdale AFB, 38 Casualty Stag- 
ing Sq. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (1); 
9754, 0-2/3 (11). Enlisted: 902X0B, 
E-3/9 (25); 90450B, E-5 (1); 90570, 
E-7 (1). 

Algiers, 637 USAF Hospital. Of- 
ficer: 9025, 0-2/3 (1); 9326, 0-2/4 
(12); 9754, 0-2/3 (30); 9826, 0-2/3 
(1); 9926, 0-2/3 (1). Enlisted: 
902X0B, E-3/7 (22); 902X2, E-3/5 
(7); 904X0B, E-4/6 (6); 90570, E-6/7 
(2). 



MARYLAND 
Baltimore, 628 USAF Hospital. 
Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (2); 9326, 0-2/4 
(4); 9754, 0-2/3 (22); 9826, 0-2/3 
(2). Enlisted: 902X0B, E-4/8 (8); 
904X0B, E-4/6 (3); 905X0, E-6/7 (2). 



MASSACHUSETTS 
Boston, 619 USAF Hospital. Offi- 
cer: 9025, 0-2/3 (3); 9326, 0-2/5 
(16); 9754, 0-2/5 (41); 9926, 0-2/3 
(1). Enlisted: 902X0B, E-3/9 (16). 



MICHIGAN 

Selfridge AFB, 4 Aeromedical 
Evac. Gp. Officer: 9016, 0-5 (1); 
9025, 0-2/3 (1). Enlisted: A902X0B 
E-6/9 (3). 

45 Aeromedical Evac. Sq. Officer: 
9025, 0-2/3 (5); 9754, 0-2/3 (7). 
Enlisted: A902X0B, E-3/8 (26); 
906X1, E-3/6 (2). 



MINNESOTA 
Mpls.-St. Paul, 47 Aeromedical 
Evac. Sq. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (1); 
9754, 0-2/3 (15). Enlisted: A902X0B, 
E-4/8 (13); 906X1, E-5/6 (2). 



MISSOURI 
Richards-Gebaur AFB, 36 Aero- 
medical Evac. Sq. Officer: 9025, 
0-2/3 (4); 9035, 0-2/3 (1); 9754, 
0-2/3 (12). Enlisted: A902X0B, 
E-4/8 (39). 



NEW JERSEY 
McGuire AFB, 33 Casualty Stag- 
ing Sq. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (4); 
9326, 0-2/3 (1); 9754, 0-2/3 (9). 
Enlisted: 902X0B, E-3/9 (30); 
90450B, E-5 (1); 90671, E-6/7 (2). 



NEW YORK 
Mitchel AFB, 635 USAF Hospital. 
Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (5); 9326, 0-2/4 



(27); 9754, 0-2/4 (97). Enlisted: 
902X0B, E-3/8 (50); 904X0B, E-4/9 
(5). 



OREGON 
Portland IAP, 40 Aeromedical 
Evac. Sq. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (4); 
9754, 0-2/4, (49). Enlisted: 01090, 
E-7 (1); A902X0B, E-4/8 (58). 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Coraopolis, 7 Aeromedical Evac. 
Gp. Enlisted: A902X0B, E-6/7 (2). 

33 Aeromedical Evac. Sq. Officer 
9025. 0-2/3 (1); 9754, 0-2/3 (2). En- 
listed: A90250B, E-4/5 (3). 

NAS Willow Grove, 51 Casualty 
Staging Sq. Officer: 9025. 0-2/3 (10); 
9326, 0-2/5 (5); 9754, 0-2/3 (30). En- 
listed: 902X0B, E-4/9 (30); 90258. 
E-4/5 (4); 90450, E-5 (1); 90570, E-7 
(1); 906X1, E-3/7 (3). 



TEXAS 

Ellington AFB, 32 Casualty Staging 
Sq. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (3); 9326. 
0-2/3 (2); 9754, 0-2/3 (7). Enlisted: 
902XOB, E-4/7 (6). 

Kelly AFB, 34 Aeromedical Evac. 
Sq. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (5); 9754, 
0-2/3 (41). Enlisted: A902XOB, E-4/6 
(37). 

Carswell AFB, 622 USAF Hos- 
pital. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (2); 9326 
0-2/4 (24); 9754, 0-2/4 (59). Enlisted 
902X0B, E-3/7 (23); 902X2, E-3/5 (8) 
90277. E-6/7 (12); 902X8, E-3/5 (8) 
904X0B. E-4/8 (6). 



UTAH 
Salt Lake City, 32 Aeromedical 
Evac. Sq. Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (5); 
9754, 0-2/3 (39). Enlisted: A902X0B. 
E-3/9 (50). 



WASHINGTON 
Seattle, 39 Casualty Staging Sq. 
Officer: 9025, 0-2/3 (2); 9326, 0-2/3 
(1); 9754, 0-2/3 (5). Enlisted: 
902X0B, E-4/7 (10); 90450B, E-5 (1); 
905X0, E-5/7 (2); 906X1. E-5/6 (2). 



Air National Guard units are eligi- 
ble fo use the "Help Wanted" sec- 
tion of The AIR RESERVIST maga- 
zine. Send unit vacancy lists to: 
National Guard Bureau, Office of 
Public Affairs, Pentagon, Wash. 25, 
D. C. Below are reported vacancies 
within the ANG. 



CALIFORNIA 

Sacramento, 162 Communications 
Gp., (ANG). Officer: 3034, 0-3 (1) 
9326, 0-3 (1); 9826, 0-3 (1). Enlisted 
291X0, E-3/7; 306X0, E-3/5, 307X0 
E-3/6; 361X1, E-3/5; 36152, E-3/4 
363X0, E-3/5; 543X0, E-2/5; 522X0 
E-3/5; 702X0. E-3/5; 732X0, E-2/5; 
771X0, E-3/5; 902X0. E-3/6; 906X0, 
E-4; 982X0, E-2/4. 

Van Nuys, 147 Communications 
Sq., (ANG). Enlisted: 222X0, E-4/5; 
E-3/7; 306X0, E-3/6; 622X0, E-2/4; 
222X1. E-4; 291X0, E-2/7; 304X4, 
646X0, E-3/6; 361X0, E-3/7; 361X2, 
E-3/5; 471X1, E-3/5; 543X0, E-3/5; 
545X0, E-3/6. 

261 Radio Relay Sq„ (ANG). En- 
listed: 304X0, E-3/6; 471X1, E-2/5; 
471X0. E-5/7; 543X0, E-3/5; 646X0. 
E-3/5; 75172, E-5/7; 902X0, E-5/7. 

Compton, 148 Communications Sq., 
(ANG). Officer: 3034, 0-2/3 (2). En- 
listed: 291X0, E-3/7; 304X4, E-3/7; 
306X0, E-3/5; 307X0, E-3/5; 363X0, 
E-3/5; 543X0, E-3/5. 

Costa Mesa, 222 Radio Relay Sq., 
(ANG). Enlisted: 304X0, E-3/7; 
543X0, E-3/5; 552X0, E-3/4; 646X0, 
E-3/6; 702X0, E-3/4; 906X0. E-3/5. 

Hayward, 216 GEEIA Sq.. (ANG). 
Enlisted: 361X0. E-3/6; 361X1, E-3/5; 
363X0. E-3/7. 

234 Mobile Communications Fit., 
(ANG). Enlisted: 293X0, E-3/5: 
304X1, E-3/7; 471X1, E-3/4; 646X0, 
E-3/5; 732X0, E-3/5. 

15 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



DEPARTMENT OF THE Alf I 
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



USAF Recurring Publication 30- 
No. 30-H-1-64-322.293 




RESERVE CAMERA 





O Equipment used in recent Air University "aerospace" briefinm 

Reservists of 8510th AFRRGp., ROTC cadets and guests atM 

University is explained by Maj. Francis J. Sweeney, Jr., Air Unim 

briefing officer to Col. Cleo R. Mace, 8510th commander. Lo\ 

on (l-r) are briefing team members Majors James S. Wall and Gt 

T. James, Jr. @ lnter-service cooperation has saved time and m 

for the Air Force ROTC at the University of Florida. ProvirM 

branches of the Armed Services can get together, Gainesville A 

Navy, and Air Force Reserve officers review success of the h 

joint physical exams conducted for AFROTC cadets. Discitssini 

program are (l-r): Maj. John Gabbert, USAF; Cdr. Robert R. Rod 

Naval Reserve Center; Col. Henry S. Blank, 620th USAF h\ 

(Res) and Lt. Col. Henry W. Deurloo, Army Reserve Medical C 

Q Crew members of a C-54 aircraft stationed at Tinker AFB, 

Air Material Area, were cited for averting a possible crash over he 

populated St. Louis, Mo., during a training mission. Recipients ofm 

mendation Medals were (l-r): SMSgt. Harry L. Cross, aircraft engii 

assigned to the 2854th ABWg., and Reservist Maj. William 

Downham, aircraft commander. Q Ladies of the Central Ohio 

Force Reserve Auxiliary attended the National Security SemintM 

ducted by the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, at OhiM 

University. The purpose was to afford Columbus Citizens the opp 

nity of becoming better informed on national security, the Comm 

threat and the world struggle for space. Top (l-r): Mrs. Harry T. //« 

Mrs. Robert C. Cupp; Mrs. Raymond H. Marlowe. Bottom (1-rW 

George C. Goodrich; Mrs. Ted C. Rytel; Mrs. Kenneth S. ZiM 

and Mrs. Allen R. Beard. 

a i-m-7 




AZINE OF TH 










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AIR RESERVE 



FORCES 



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What they are 
Why they are 











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■■ 



Ahe objectives of this special 
issue are to acquaint Reserv- 
ists with the many aspects and 
benefits of the Air Reserve 
Forces programs; to serve as 
a recruiting aid; and to assist 
in filling the knowledge gap 
between Regular and Reserve 
Forces as it pertains to the 
augmentation capability and 
potential of the Air Reserve 
Forces. Thus, this basic look: 

What they are, 

Why they are, 

What they expect , and 

What they offer. 

Understanding the funda- 
mentals of the Air Force Re- 
serve and Air National Guard 
programs is a requirement if 
maximum utilization is to be 
achieved. 

The term "Reservist" as 
used in this issue applies to 
all members of the Air Na- 
tional Guard and the Air 
Force Reserve. 



the air reservist 

Vol. XVI-No. 2 March/April 1964 

AIR NATIONAL GUARD 
AIR FORCE RESERVE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 
EDITOR: 

Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 

The Air Reservist Is an official publication 

of Hq USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Bolllni AFB, Washington 23, DC. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed In the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 
has been approved by Hq USAF. 



c 


N 
T 
E 
N 
T 

w • • • 



22 


Air Force Point 




of View 


12 


Aircraft 


18 


Business/Industry 




Support 


6 


Commissioning 




Programs 


2 


Evaluation 


5 


Extension Course 




Institute 


8 


Family Protection 


19 


Family Support 


21 


Glossary 


20 


Help Wanted 


4 


Military Service 




Obligation 


15 


Organization 


5 


Pay 


9 


Policy 


3 


Problem Areas 


10 


Program Elements 


3 


Projection 


7 


Promotion 


16 


Questions and 




Answers 


17 


Regulations 


24 


Reserve Camera 


8 


Retirement 


9 


Social Security 


9 


Survivors Benefits 


9 


Training 


14 


Units & Missions 


4 


Women in the 




Air Force 



'm grateful for this opportunity to give you v.nat 
amounts to my first annual report — a review of what 1 
the Air Reserve Forces have accomplished this past 
year and a look at some of the problems we face. 

1963 was a good year. Maybe the events don't apJ 
pear as earth shaking as those of 1961 and 1962 when| 
we had the mobilizations, but they are just as impor- 
tant to the future of the Reserve Forces. For example, 
last June, the Air National Guard surprised even some 
of its most optimistic supporters with its successful 
recruiting program. By demonstrating an ability to 
man its units at a 75,000 level, the Air Guard was able 
to convince the Department of Defense that it should 
have a drill pay strength of 75,000 — an increase of 
3,000 over its old ceiling. The Air Force Reserve 
close to its ceiling of 61,000. 

This has been a year in which we have begun some 
significant refining of the Air Reserve program. We put 
our heavy C-124 troop carrier units in MATS where ; 
they would be more useful in peacetime as well as in, 
war. We reorganized all of our troop carrier units into 
self supporting groups to improve their combat effective- 
ness. Within the Tactical Air Command committed 
groups, we have organized aerial port flights to replace 
the old aerial port squadrons, thereby further increasing 
the ability of these groups to function independently. 

The Air Force has taken a hard look at other por- 
tions of the program also. Our big Reserve hospitals 
and casualty staging groups are a good example. These 
units have historically been impossible to man at ac-j 
ceptable levels. There was a problem of getting enough 
equipment for them and an additional problem of 
keeping their supplies and equipment as current as 
medical supplies have to be. Of the 20 units which^ 
we had, one is being retained at a reduced size. The 
others are being replaced by 148 medical service units 
— small, flexible, and highly versatile units which will 
train at active force medical facilities. These can be 
used to augment or replace their active Air Force 
parent units, or they can be meshed with each other to 
give us about any kind of medical capability we need. 

We're also in the process of refining our Recovery 
program. When we started out several years ago, we 
had to plan on covering any eventuality, and our re- 
covery units were organized and located accordingly. 
With the development of the Air Force Survival Plan 
we now have firm missions and firm locations where 
these missions are to be performed. This takes some 
cutting and patching, and we don't know yet exactly 
where and how many units we'll have when it's all 
over. There will no doubt be some Reservists who will 
have to change jobs, but we must come out with a 
firm program — one which we can support in these times 
of extreme economy and one which will provide the 
much needed support to the Air Force. 

In the Guard, too, we've been doing some shuffling 
to increase combat effectiveness. The aeromedical trans- 
port squadrons are being redesignated heavy air trans- 
port, giving them greater versatility without diminishing 
their aeromedical evacuation usefulness. 

We have some significant aircraft changes coming up 
also. One of the New Jersey squadrons, which hasl 
been suffering the equipment pinch ever since its F-84< 
were retained by the Air Force after the Berlin call-up 
is swapping off its substitute F-86s for F-105s. Thrtfl 
other Guard squadrons are getting B-57s — the first tinw 
the Guard has had a tactical bomber mission since the 
last of the B-26s went out years ago. 



HE 

IR RESERVE 

ORGES 



Problems and 
Progress 




Maj Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't. Chief of Staff, Reserve Forces 



And with all our changes and improvements, we 

itinue to provide "more Air Force" for the country 

using our Reserve Forces in a day by day effort. Both 

ard and Reserve heavy transports are now carrying 

VTS cargo on their overseas training flights. CON- 

C continues to provide additional airlift for TAC. 

year round support and in special exercises, our 

op carriers furnish the lion's share of the Army's 

borne training requirement. And we have planes in 

air practically every day on special missions for 

Air Force — transporting equipment, performing 

rcy flights, and so on. In fact, when we totaled up 

figures for Calendar Year 1963, we discovered that 

Air Reserve Forces actually produced better than 

percent of the total Air Force requirement for airlift. 

Not all of our picture is sweetness and light: we 

/e some rather critical problems. And although we 

making progress, we are a long way from solutions 

all of them. Here are a few of the current problems 

ich may give you an idea of what we're up against. 

One of the most glaring is our need for a source of 
<v pilots for both the Air National Guard and Air 
rce Reserve. Our pilots are among the best there 
Their experience level is the envy of the active 
ce. But that very experience level is one source of 
r problem. They're getting close to the point where 
y'll be forced out of the program — either by manda- 
y retirement or by being promoted out of the unit 
ide structure. We're already using overgrade man- 
ig to meet our needs, but that can't last. Most of these 
jerienced pilots will be gone by 1970. The Guard 

managed to keep its average pilot age down pretty 
11; it has a very small jet pilot training quota. But 
n that is not enough to provide the input we need 
;r the next few years. And the Air Force Reserve 
;sn't have a pilot training quota. That leaves both 
nponents dependent on fallout from the Air Force 
their principal source of pilots, and, frankly, it just 
n't fill the requirement. The Under Secretary of the 
r Force has approved a pilot training program for 
\ Air Force Reserve for planning purposes, and Air 
rce Headquarters is determining the requirements, 
>ney, personnel and facilities to support it. That, as 
u may suspect, is not an easy task in today's fiscal 
nate, but we are working at it. 

In the past, we have had a problem in getting non- 
ed junior officers. We now have authority to use 

Officer Training School and this should put us on 

right track in this area. The program assures us a 
ans of getting an excellent quality of talent in at the 
ttom where we need it. 
We have our ever present problem of airman recruit- 

and retention. Even with the outstanding gains 



which we have made in drill pay strength, we need a 
sizeable input of airmen each year to meet the normal 
attrition which besets any Reserve component. To pro- 
duce this, we're emphasizing the tried and true methods 
of personnel procurement. We're also trying some new 
wrinkles. For example, the Recruiting Service is run- 
ning a one year test in two of its regions to see how 
well it can do the recruiting job for the Air Force 
Reserve as well as the active Air Force. 

No discussion of problems would be complete with- 
out some mention of the Air Reserve Forces Ad Hoc 
Study Group which met last December. This group, of 
which I was chairman, was unusual in that its specific 
task was to define major problem areas rather than 
propose solutions to obvious deficiencies. 

Here is a sketchy review of the group's findings so 
that you can see the direction in which we are think- 
ing about the future of our Air Reserve Forces. 

First of all, the group concluded that the Reserve 
Forces are so much a part of the Air Force that their 
future, their missions, and the concepts under which 
they exist are necessarily tied very closely to those of 
the Active Force. Since this ruled out any wild-blue- 
yonder type new missions for the Reserves, we con- 
centrated on the things that were keeping us from doing 
the most we could in areas within the Air Force mission. 

We found some things out of phase within our pro- 
gram. The group concluded that the training program 
for individuals is clearly the weakest aspect of the 
entire Reserve program and that it should be over- 
hauled completely. The group felt that there must be 
better identification of availability and usefulness and 
that the training program must be revised and hardened 
to produce what the Air Force needs, rather than to 
find some way to train the people we have on board. 

We took a hard look at the non-flying unit program, 
and decided that if we need a unit, we have to man it 
and equip it to perform its wartime mission. If we 
don't have the resources to go around, we felt that then 
we must concentrate the resources and build only the 
units that we can support. 

We found also that the Air Reserve Forces have a 
lot more potential than is recognized by some who are 
responsible for planning the use of our Reserve Forces. 
Reserve readiness, availability, and usefulness must be 
known if the Air Force is to get the most out of all 
its resources. 

In other words we must meld the entire Air Force 
into one entity in peace as well as war if we are to move 
ahead in this Aerospace Age. 

Lastly, the Study Group took a hard look at various 

See Gen. LOW page 12 



it 



You and the Air Reserve Forces.. 



D 



efending the rights of Americans is 
an obligation of every citizen. Eco- 
nomically, it isn't practical to main- 
tain an active military force large 
enough to cope with any emer- 
gency. The Reserve Forces bridge 
this gap. They proved to be an in- 
tegral part of the "total force" de- 
fense structure by their "fantastic" 
response during Berlin/Cuba crises. 
Basically, there are five ways to 
satisfy a military obligation: 

• Active Service 

• National Guard and Reserve 
Programs 

• Draft 

• Service Academies 

• ROTC Programs 

Enlistment in the Air Reserve 
Forces (Air National Guard and 
Air Force Reserve) will satisfy a 
military service obligation. Require- 



ments for enlistment in the Air Na- 
tional Guard are contained in 
ANGR 39-09, and for the Air Force 
Reserve, AFR 45-47. Persons with 
no previous military service volun- 
tarily agree to serve for six years, 
part of which includes active duty 
for training with the active Air 
Force. Active duty training time 
may vary, depending upon the re- 
quirements to qualify for a specific 
assignment. The minimum is four 
months and usually begins within 
120 days after enlistment. Upon 
completing active duty training, the 
enlistee is required to serve as a 
Ready Reservist for the remainder 
of the six years. Prior service appli- 
cants who have satisfied their mili- 
tary service obligation may enlist 
in the Air National Guard or Air 
Force Reserve for one year or 
longer and usually at the grade 
held when last discharged. 



WOMEN In The Air Force 

Women with or without pri< 
military service are eligible to b> 
come members of the Air Reser* 
Forces. In the Air Force Reserv 
women officers, and airmen WA 
serve in a wide variety of Air For< 
specialties. In the Air Nation 
Guard, women officers are urgent! 
needed to fill its requirements in tb 
nursing profession. 

Benefits available to male Resen 
ists apply to female Reservists. 

Women applicants for enlistmei 
in the Air Reserve Forces may s<J 
cure information concerning eligl 
bility requirements and unit vacail 
cies from the Reserve unit in thd 
area or from the local Air Force R< 
cruiting Service office. Details ai 
covered in USAF Recruiting Ser< 
ice Manual 33-3. 



School 
Training 




M, 



. embers of Ready Reserve units 
and Reservists holding a mobiliza- 
tion position are eligible to attend 
service schools. 

There are two types of schools 
available to Reservists: (1) courses 
established exclusively for Reserve 
personnel and (2) courses primarily 
conducted for active duty person- 
nel. The Reserve courses usually 
last two weeks while the other 
courses vary. Examples of Reserve 
courses are Technical Refresher 
courses and Air University Orienta- 
tion courses. In addition there are 



the National Resources conferences 
and Scientific Seminars. 

A Reservist may apply for school 
training by submitting an application 
to his commander. Guidance may 
be found in AFR 50-41 (ANGR 
50-05 for Guardsmen) and in USAF 
Training Prospectus AFM 50-5. 

Listed below is the majority of 
the educational opportunities avail- 
able to Reservists and location of 
the schools: 

AIR TRAINING COMMAND 

Headquarters, Air Training Com- 
mand is located at Randolph AFB, 
Texas. The courses listed are con- 
ducted at various locations. Consult 
unit training officer or the USAF 
Training Prospectus for details. 

Officer 

Air Electronics (Aircraft Radio-Radar 

Navigational Aids) 
Aircraft Maintenance 
Supply 
Personnel 
USAF Chaplain 
Maintenance Engineering Production 

Analysis 
OJT Administrator Supervisor 
Instrument Pilot Instructor School 

(Reciprocating Engine) 
Flight Nurse 
Refresher Course in Hospital 

Administration 
Medical Supply Officer Symposium 
Veterinary Officer (Basic) 
Physiological Training Officer 

Symposium 



Medical Service (Basic Orientation 

Course) 
Aviation Medicine (Primary Course) 

Airmen 

Aircraft Radio Maintenance Technician 

Flight Facilities Equipment Maintenano 
Technician 

Ground Radio Maintenance Technician 

Aircraft Propeller Technician 

Aircraft Hydraulic Technician 

Instrument Repair Technician 

Aircraft Electrical Repair Technician 

Aircraft Maintenance Technician- 
Reciprocating Engine 

Reciprocating Engine Technician 

Firefighting Supervisor 

Flight Engineer Technician 

Manpower Management Technician 

OJT Administrator Supervisor 

Control Tower Operator 

Ground Radio Operator 

Airborne Radio Operator 

Aircraft Radio Repairman (Command) 

Cryptographic Equipment Repairman 

Firefighter 

Personnel Specialist 

Medical Service Technician 

Medical Administration Supervisor 

Preventive Medicine 

Dental Technician 

Crown and Bridge Dental Prosthetics 

AIR UNIVERSITY 

Air University is located at Ma: 
well AFB, Alabama. Following ai 
some of the courses conducted f( 
Reserve officers: 
Command and Staff School Orientation 

Course 
Refresher Courses for Reserve Dental 

Officers 
Squadron Officer School 
Academic Instructor Course 
Air Warfare Systems Orientation Coursn 



. he Extension Course Institute is 
2 world's largest correspondence 
100I. It offers a curriculum of 
neral and professional military 
ucation courses and a variety of 
lg and short courses in technical 
d administrative Air Force spe- 
ilties. All members of the Air 
iserve Forces are eligible to apply 
■ enrollment in ECI home study 
urses and earn points that are 
editable toward retirement and 
:ention. Courses vary in the num- 
r of hours considered necessary 
• completion. Reservists earn one 
int for each three hours of study 
solved. Example: ECI Course 
20, "Photographic Fundamen- 
s" is a one-volume course which 
mires about 45 hours of home 
idy. Upon completion the Reserv- 
is credited with 15 points. Ap- 
cation for enrollment may be ob- 
ned from unit Education or Train- 
; officers or the Extension Course 
stitute, Gunter AFB, Alabama, 
servists not assigned to a unit 
ist submit their request to the 
r Reserve Records Center, 3800 
>rk St., Denver, Colo. 80205. 
Following are some of the courses 
ered by the Extension Course 
stitute by number and title: 

>. Title 

Officer Candidate School 
Squadron Officer School 
Air Command and Staff College 
Air War College 
Management for Air Force 

Supervisors 
Still Photographic Officer 
Photographic Fundamentals 
Still Photographer 
Air Weather Officer 
Air Traffic Control 

Fundamentals 
Ground Radio Operator 
Airborne Radio Operator 
Communications Center 

Specialist 
Air Electronics Officer 
Communications Officer 
Radio Fundamentals 
Aircraft Radio Repairman 

(General) 
Aircraft Radio Repairman 

(Navigational) 
Electronics Fundamentals 
Telephone Installer-Repairman 
Aircraft Instrument Mechanic 
Aircraft Propeller Mechanic 
Ground Equipment Mainte- 
nance Engineering Officer 
Aircraft Mechanic, Basic 
Aircraft Reciprocating Engine 

Mechanic 
Aircraft Jet Engine Mechanic 
Fire Fighting and Aircraft 

Crash Rescue 
Firefighter Supervisor and 

Superintendent 
Supply Services 
Basic Supply 
Warehousing 
Basic Air Force Accounting 

and Finance 
Administrative Officer 



)0 
>0 
>2 
)0 
>0A 

SI 
(2 
S5A 

)1 

)8 
11 
>7 



>0 
>4 
>1 
U 
)4 

10 

II 

12 

11 

n 

)3 

>i 

22A 
11 




3 erving as a member of the Air 
Reserve Forces is as good as put- 
ting money in the bank. Many Re- 
servists are paid for 48 drills and 
15 days "summer training" each 
year, and Reservists on flying status 
can earn an additional 36 days pay 
per year. Reserve pay represents a 
significant means of supplementing 
family income. Examples: A tech- 
nical sergeant with over 12 years 
service can earn about $640 for 12 



weekends of training plus his 15- 
day summer tour. A captain with 
over six years service (on flying 
status) will earn almost $1,800 for 
his year of participating with the 
Air Reserve Forces. 

All Air National Guardsmen are 
in a pay group "A" status. This 
entitles them to be paid for 48 drills 
and 15 days active duty each year. 
(See chart, below). About 67,000 
Air Force Reservists are paid for 
their training, but the number of 
annual paid training periods varies 
according to the need for the unit or 
individual to maintain combat effec- 
tiveness. Of these, nearly 35,000 
are paid for 48 drills annually, 23,- 
000 for 24 drills, and another 9,000 
for short tours of active duty train- 
ing only. Rated personnel (those on 
flying status) of the Air National 
Guard and Air Force Reserve are 
entitled to 36 additional flying train- 
ing periods each year. 



under 
2 



OFFICERS 

10 12 14 16 



18 20 22 26 








Over 


0-3 


17.33 


18.17 


18.83 


19.83 


20.83 


21.67 






010 


56.00 


59.50 




4 yrs 
enl. 
Time 


0-2 


15.50 


15.83 


16.33 


17.17 


17.83 


18.33 




0-9 


48.00 


49.00 


52.50 




0-1 


12.50 


13.33 


13.83 


14.33 


14.83 


15.50 


0-8 


43.83 


45.50 


47.33 






















0-7 


38.50 


41.17 






















0-6 


24.50 


25.33 


29.33 


30.83 


31.50 


33.33 


36.17 












0-5 


21.00 


21.67 


22.83 


24.33 


26.17 


27.67 


28.50 


29.50 












0-4 


18.67 


19.50 


20.83 


22.00 


23.00 


24.00 


24.67 








0-3 


10.87 


14.67 


15.67 


17.38 


18.17 


18.83 


19.83 


20.83 


21.33 












0-2 


8.64 


12.50 


15.00 


15.50 


15.83 




















0-1 


7.41 


10.00 


12.50 

























Charts indicate pay authorized Reservists receive 
for one training period or one day of active duty. 



under 
2 2 3 



ENLISTED 

10 12 14 16 



18 20 22 26 



)0 















E-9 


14.50 


14.83 


15.17 


15.50 


15.83 


16.17 


17.00 


18.67 












E-8 


12.17 


12.50 


12.83 


13.17 


13.50 


13.83 


14.17 


15.00 


16.67 










E-7 


10.17 


10.50 


10.83 


11.17 


11.67 


12.00 


12.33 


12.50 


13.33 


15.00 








E-6 


8.67 


9.00 


9.33 


9.67 


10.17 


10.50 


10.83 


11.00 












-E-5 


7.33 


7.67 


8.17 


8.50 


8.83 


9.17 


9.33 












E-4 


4.08 


6.00 


6.33 


6.83 


7.17 


WARRANT OFFICERS 


E-3 


3.31 


4.83 


5.17 


5.50 




W-4 


16.67 


17.83 


18.67 


19.33 


19.83 


20.50 


21.17 


22.83 


E-2 


2.86 


4.00 






W-3 


14.50 


15.33 


15.83 


16.33 


16.83 


17.33 


18.00 


18.67 


19.33 


E-l 


2.77 


3.67 




W-2 


12.50 


13.17 


13.67 


14.17 


14.67 


15.17 


15.67 


16.17 


16.83 










W-l 


11.00 


11.50 


12.00 


12.50 


13.00 


13.50 


14.00 


14.50 


15.00 







There are Five Ways to a Commission... 




T 



here are five methods of earning a 
commission. The Officers Training 
School (OTS) and the Outstanding 
Airman Commissioning Programs 
supply the Air Force Reserve with 
junior officers. The Air National 
Guard acquires new officers from 
the Officer Training School and the 
Flight Training Programs. Air Force 
Academy and Air Force Reserve 
Officers Training Corps (AFROTC) 
graduates enter the active duty Air 
Force. A brief description of the 
commissioning programs follows: 

OTS 

Officer Training School consists 
of three months active duty train- 
ing for college graduates after which 
the student is commissioned a sec- 
ond lieutenant and returned to his 
unit to serve the remainder of his 
military obligation or four years, 
whichever is longer. 

Eligibility requirements and other 
details may be had by contacting 
the nearest Air National Guard or 
Air Force Reserve unit or by writing 
to the Adjutant General in your 
state capital or Hq.CONAC 

OUTSTANDING AIRMAN 

Each year, Air Force Reserve 
airmen assigned to Ready Reserve 
positions may apply for appoint- 
ment under the Outstanding Re- 



serve Airmen Appointment Pro- 
gram. Direct appointments are made 
in grades up to and including cap- 
tain with concurrent Ready Reserve 
assignments. Details of this program 
are in CONAC Letter 45-6. For fur- 
ther information, contact the near- 
est Air Force Reserve unit. 

AF ACADEMY 

Requirements for admission are 
strict and only those students plan- 
ning on a military career should ap- 
ply. In general, applicants must be 
at least 17, but not yet 22 as of 
July 1 of the year they are to be 
admitted. They must be of good 
moral character, have the necessary 
physical and mental requirements, 
be single and never have been mar- 
ried. Completion earns students a 
second lieutenant commission in the 
Regular Air Force. For further in- 
formation write to the Registrar, 
U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado 
Springs, Colorado. 

FLIGHT TRAINING 

Young men who meet the quali- 
fications for Air National Guard's 
Flight Training program are com- 
missioned second lieutenants and 
entered directly into the pilot or 
navigator training program of the 
U. S. Air Force. Pilot training takes 
approximately one year and navi- 



YOU MAY 

BE ELIGIBLE FOR 



OUTSTANDING AIF 



AIR FORCE ACAD! 



FLIGHT TRAINING 



• AIR FORCE ROTC 



gator training about 1 1 months 
After graduation, pilots take ad 
vance training in the type aircraft 
used by their particular Guard unit 
This training lasts from 30 days U 
7 months. Pilots are obligated U 
serve five years in the Air Nationa 
Guard after graduation. Navigate 
school graduates return to their uni 
and also are obligated to serve fiv» 
years with the Air Guard. 

For further information concern 
ing eligibility, visit a local Guan 
unit or write the Adjutant Genera 
of the respective state capital. 

AFROTC 

College students between the age 
of 17 and 27 can enroll in the Ai 
Force Reserve Officer Trainin 
Corps program. About 100,000 stu 
dents are in this four year prograir 
The basic course is taught in th 
freshman and sophomore years, an 
an advanced course, with pay, i 
given during the junior and senic 
years. Commission as a second liei 
tenant at graduation is followed b 
four years of active duty for nor 
pilots and five years for flying pei 
sonnel. Active duty is followed b 
duty in the Reserve Forces. For fui 
ther information, write Commanc 
ant, Headquarters, Air Force Rf 
serve Officer Training Corps, Ma^ 
well AFB, Alabama. 



ortunities for promotion within 
5 Air Reserve Forces are num- 
jus. Promotions mean increased 
y, authority, prestige, responsi- 
ity, and also increases the amount 
retired pay. Following are the 
neral requirements for promotion: 

OFFICERS 

The Reserve Officer Personnel 
:t governs the promotion, prece- 
nce, constructive credit, distribu- 
n, retention and elimination of 

serve officers. ROPA offers three 
:thods of promotion for Reserve 
icers: mandatory, unit vacancy, 
overall vacancy. For Air Na- 
nal Guard officers, specific poli- 
:s and eligibility requirements are 
ntained in ANG Regulation 36- 
Reserve officers should continu- 
y review their records to insure 
it they are up-to-date, and that 
anges are reported. Also, they 
Duld be sure to participate accord- 
5 to their category, and if possible, 
p up their participation in the 
tension Course Institute. 
Mandatory promotions affect Re- 
ve majors, captains, first lieuten- 
ts, and second lieutenants. Wheth- 

or not a vacancy exists in the 
xt higher grade, these officers may 

promoted if they meet the pre- 
dion service and total years serv- 
requirements and are recom- 
:nded by a selection board. Pro- 
)tions to fill unit vacancies are 
lited to the grades of captain, 
ijor, lieutenant colonel and colo- 
who are specially qualified for 
d geographically available to fill 
: position and are recommended 

their commanders and selected 

a board. Overall vacancy promo- 
ns to colonel are made by a se- 
tion board convened by the Sec- 
ary of the Air Force. 




P 



R 







M 



T 







N 



S 



represent awards which affect . . . 

• Pay— an immediate increase 

• Retirement— bigger payments 

• Authority— a wider scope 

• Prestige— a mark of ability 

AIRMEN 



Each unit of the Air Reserve 
Forces is authorized a definite num- 
ber of officer and airman grades. 
Qualified Reservists may be pro- 
moted when vacancies exist. 

Naturally, the Reservist who at- 
tends the required unit training 
assemblies; who participates in sum- 
mer encampment training; who con- 
tributes to accomplishing the unit 
mission, and who shows a desire 
for self-improvement by taking ECI 
courses, will be among the first to 
be considered for promotion. 

Normally, Basic Airmen are auto- 
matically promoted to Airman Third 
Class after about eight weeks of 
active duty training. Promotion to 
other grades requires certain pe- 
riods of time in grade (TIG), total 
military service (TMS), appropri- 
ate skill levels and the existence of 
a unit vacancy. The following pro- 
motion criteria applies to enlisted 



men of the Air Reserve Forces. 

Master sergeants must pass a su- 
pervisors test before being eligible 
for promotion to the grade of senior 
master sergeant. In addition, master 
sergeants and senior master ser- 
geants must have a prescribed num- 
ber of years of previous enlisted 
service before being eligible for pro- 
motion. The former must have at 
least eight years of enlisted service, 
and the latter, ten years. Details con- 
cerning promotion of enlisted men 
of the Air Force Reserve are con- 
tained in AFR 45-59. For Air Na- 
tional Guard enlisted men, details 
are covered by ANGR 39-29. 

Members of the Air Force Re- 
serve may obtain additional infor- 
mation on promotion by writing the 
Air Reserve Records Center, 3800 
York St., Denver, Colo. 80205. Air 
Guardsmen may write the Adjutant 
General of their state capital. 



OFFICER PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS 



Unit Vacancy 



Mandatory 



Promotion to: 


Years 
Service 


Captain 


3 


Major 


4 


Lt. Col. 


4 



Colonel 



Promotion 

tO: 


PS* 


TFCS* 


1st Lt. 


3 


— 


Captain 


4 


7 


Major 


7 


14 



Lt. Col. 



21 



PS— Promotion Service years in grade 

TFCS— Total Federal Commissioned Service (years) 



AIRMAN PROMOTION REQUIREMENTS 

Time in 
Promotion to Grade 


Total 

Military 

Service 


A2C 


8 mos. 


— 


A1C 


12 mos. 


— 


SSgt 


18 mos. 


4 yrs. 
(ANG) 


TSgt 


21 mos. 


— 


MSgt 


24 mos. 


— 


SMSgt 


24 mos. 


10 yrs. 


CMSgt(ANG) 


18 mos. 


10 yrs. 


CMSgt(AFRes) 


24 mos. 


11 yrs. 




Reservists plan for 
security during... 



R E 



T I 



R 



etirement with pay is the most significant benefit avail- 
able to members of the Air Reserve Forces. Reservists 
are eligible to receive retirement benefits at age 60 
upon completion of 20 years of federal service. 

Retirement pay is based on the number of points 
a Reservist is credited with during his active and in- 
active service. Since July 1, 1949, Reservists must have 
at least 50 points (35 earned and 15 gratuitous) per 
year to be credited with a "good" year (a year of serv- 
ice for retirement). All active and inactive service prior 
to that date counts toward retirement. 

In addition to the 15 gratuitous points a Reservist 
may earn additional points toward retirement through 
the following: 

• Participation in unit training periods (Category 
A or B units ) . 

• As a mobilization assignee to a unit of a major air 
command (Parti). 

• As a mobilization assignee receiving Air Force 
Reserve element training (Part III). 

• As an enrollee in military correspondence courses 
conducted by the USAF Extension Course Institute. 

• By association with programs such as Informa- 
tion Flights, Research and Development projects, 
JAGAR (Judge Advocate General Area Representa- 
tive), USAF Academy Liaison Officer Program, 
MARS (Military Affiliate Radio System), and other 
authorized activities. 

AFR 45-15 gives detailed information concerning 
point-gaining activities. 

Under the Reserve Forces point system a Reservist 
is awarded 50 points for each 365 days of inactive duty 
before July 1, 1949 and one point for each day of 




R E 




M E 



N T 



active duty served before that date. After July 1, 1941 
Reservists may count one point for each day of activ 
duty and one point for each authorized training perioi 
or day of active duty for training. 

To compute retirement points, a Reservist counts a 
points earned while on active duty. To this he adds ] 
maximum of 60 points per year earned through inactiv 
duty (including the 15 gratuitous points). Exampld 
A Reservist may earn 15 active duty points from h! 
summer encampment training, and 48 inactive din 
points from his unit training assemblies. With his 1 
gratuitous points he has accumulated a total of 78 pour 
of which only 75 will count toward retirement. Tt 
total of active and inactive duty training points may n« 
exceed 365 in any one year — 366 for leap years. 

Retirement points a Reservist earns throughout h 
career are used as the basis for computing the amoui 
of pay he will receive when he becomes eligible. Poin 1 
earned during an unsatisfactory year are also include 
in this computation. 

The method used in computing retirement pay il 
volves the following three steps: 

• Divide the total number of retirement points I 
360 and round off to two decimal places (example 
3,250 points divided by 360 equal .9027); 

• Multiply .9027 by 2Vi percent and round c 
to four decimal places (.9027 multiplied by .025 equa 
.2257); 

• Multiply .2257 by anticipated monthly bas 
pay (at time of retirement) and round off to two dec 
mal places (an E-6 with 3,250 points would multip 
$330.00 by .2257 and get $74.48 per month). 

FAMILY PROTECTION PLAN 

Members of the Reserve Forces are eligible to pa 
ticipate in the Retired Serviceman's Family Protectio 
Plan. Unless he participates in this plan his retiii 
ment pay will be discontinued upon his death. Und 
the plan, he accepts a reduced amount of retired p; 
so that his eligible survivors will continue to receij 
compensation equal to one-half, one-quarter, or ori 
eighth of his retired pay, whichever he elects. The PI? 
offers four options : 

• payment to the surviving spouse; 

• payment to surviving children; 

• payment to the spouse and children; 

• no further deductions when there is no remai 
ing beneficiary. 

A Reservist must decide whether or not to parti' 
pate in this plan before he reaches 57 years of age. 

This plan was formerly known as the Contingen 
Option Act and its details are covered in Sections 143! 
1446 of Title 10 of the U. S. Code. 



)t her Benefits 



Reserve membership also entitles 
iu to Social Security and Survivors 
nefits: 

Social Security 

The purpose of the Social Secur- 
i Act is to provide protection 
;ainst economic insecurity when 
mily income is reduced because 
retirement, disability or death. 
;servists on active duty (Example: 
ity during the Berlin and Cuba 
ises) or active duty for training 
;ample: (basic training) or (an- 
al summer tour) are covered for 
i-age, survivors, and disability in- 
rance purposes, and contribute a 
rtion of their base pay, called 
CA taxes (Federal Insurance 
intributions Act) . 
Retired pay and inactive duty 
lining pay are not subject to 
CA taxes. 

The maximum earnings on which 
cial Security taxes can be paid 
$4,800 and the Department of 
ifense contributes an amount 
ual to that paid by the Reservist. 
le current FICA deductions are 
6 percent of base pay. This will 
:rease to AVs percent for 1966 
d 1967, and reach the maximum 



of 4 5 /s percent in 1968. For further 
information concerning Social Secu- 
rity consult the personnel branch 
of any military unit or any of the 
more than 600 Social Security dis- 
trict offices. 

Survivors 

Any Reservist on active duty, 
active duty for training or inactive 
duty for training is entitled to com- 
pensation for injuries received while 
training. This includes hospitaliza- 
tion and medical treatment at Gov- 
ernment expense. 

Also, Reservists are entitled to 
the Survivors Benefits Act. Briefly, 
if a Reservist dies of injuries or 
certain diseases incurred during a 
training period or while on active 
duty in peacetime, his widow gets 
a pension of $120 plus 12 percent 
of his basic pay each month until 
her death or remarriage. In addi- 
tion, she would receive a six-month 
death gratuity payment. This lump- 
sum payment is made as soon as 
possible after the death and ranges 
from a minimum of $800 to a maxi- 
mum of $3,000. The amount is 
determined by multiplying six by the 
total monthly pay (excluding al- 
lowances). Special incentive pay 
and hazardous duty pay are included 
in the death gratuity payment. 



Policy 



raining 



The Air National Guard and Air 
rce Reserve offer a variety of 
ignments and training opportuni- 
; in almost all Air Force career 
ds. Modern equipment and quali- 
1 instructors make it possible for 
ividuals to attain a high level of 
i proficiency. 

formally the Reservist trains 
h a unit within commuting dis- 
ce of his home. The total num- 
of Air National Guard and Air 
rce Reserve training facilities is 
>ut 2,600, and they are located 



in every major city in every state. 

All Air National Guard units 
and many Air Force Reserve units 
perform 48 drill periods and 15 
days of active duty for training each 
year. Reservists are paid for these 
periods of training according to their 
grade and time in service. The 
amount of training and pay re- 
ceived varies according to the train- 
ing category and pay group as- 
signed, as indicated in the accom- 
panying chart: (Note — The Pro- 
gram Element chart on page 10 
shows the various Reserve training 
programs and the training category 
and pay group of each. ) 



TRAINING CATEGORIES 

(See AFR 45-5) 


PAY GROUPS 

(See AFR 45-5) 


NING 
.GORY 


Annual number of 

periods of inactive 

duty training 


Annual number of 

days of active duty 

for training 


PAY GROUP 


Annual number of 

paid periods of 

inactive duty 

training 


Annual number of 

days (or months) of 

active duty 

for training 




48 


IS days 


A 


48 


15 days 




24 


15 days 


B 


24 


15 days 








C 


12 


15 days 







15 days 


D 





15 days 




12 





E 





30 days 




Correspondence Courses 


F 





3-6 mos 
(one time only) 




No Training 















30 days 









The organizational structure of 
the Air Force allows all echelons of 
command a voice in policy concern- 
ing Air Reserve Forces affairs. Plan- 
ning is integrated with that for the 
active duty force at all levels, and 
Reserve matters undergo the same 
searching review as those for the 
regular establishment. In addition, 
however, provision is made for Re- 
servists to take an active role in the 
development of policies which affect 
their program. 

Committee: The Air Reserve Forces 
Policy Committee is composed of 
18 officers — six from the Regular 
Air Force, six from the Air National 
Guard and six from the Air Force 
Reserve. They advise the Secretary 
of the Air Force on matters affect- 
ing the Air Reserve Forces. 

Councils: Air Reserve Forces Policy 
Councils perform a similar function 
at the headquarters of AFLC, 
CONAC, MATS, TAC, ADC, and 
AFCS. Input for the Councils comes 
from Air Reserve Forces units, 
major command staff agencies, and 
individual Reservists. 

Board: The Reserve Forces Policy 
Board is composed of representa- 
tives of the Reserve components of 
all the services. It serves as the 
principal advisory body to the Sec- 
retary of Defense and his Assistant 
Secretary for Manpower. 

8033 and 265 Officers: In addition 
to the advisory boards and commit- 
tees, the functional agencies of the 
Air Staff and the various major air 
commands have permanent Reserve 
Affairs Advisors. These are officers 
from the Air National Guard and 
the Air Force Reserve serving on 
active duty under the provisions of 
Title 10, U. S. Code. They are fre- 
quently referred to as 8033 and 265 
officers because it is these sections 
of Title 10 which establish the posi- 
tions. They are also referred to as 
Reserve Affairs Advisors. Section 
8033 officers are assigned to Hq 
USAF only, whereas 265 officers 
may be assigned to Hq USAF or 
any other command headquarters 
having a Reserve responsibility. 

They provide a readily available 
source of knowledge about Air Re- 
serve Forces proDlems and capabil- 
ities which assists commanders and 
staff offices to make the most effec- 
tive use of the Reserve Forces. 



Every Read y Reservist fits into 

one of these programs.. 



10 





Program Element 


training 
category 


pay 
group 

A 


assigned 
to 


performs 

annual 

inactive duty 

training 


inactive duty 

training 

supervised 

by 


performs 

paid 

active duty 

training 


active dut 

training 

supervisei 

by 


1 


All Air National Guard Units 


A 


gaining 
command 


Auth. 
48 


Paid 
48 


gaining 
command 


15 
days 


gaining 

command 


2 


AF Reserve units organized to 
serve as a unit. 


A 


A 


CONAC 


48 


48 


gaining 
command 


15 

days 


gaining] 
commanc 


3 


AF Reserve units not organized to 
serve as a unit. 


A 


A 


CONAC 


48 


48 


CONAC 


15 
days 


any 

major 

air 

commano 


4 


MOARS Part 1 position 
(Flying) 


A 


A 


any 

major 

air 

command 


48 


48 


major 

air 

command 

to which 

assigned 


15 
days 


major air 
commano 
to which 
assigned 


5 


MOARS Part 1 position 


A 


A 


CONAC 


48 


48 


CONAC 


15 

days 


CONAC 


6 


MOARS Part 1 position 


A 


A 


any 

major 

air 

command 


48 


48 


major 

air 

command 

to which 

assigned 


15 
days 


major ail 
commant 
to which 
assigned 


7 


Reserve units organized to 
serve as units. 


B 


B 


CONAC 


24 


24 


CONAC 


15 
days 


CONAC 


8 


MOARS Part 1 position 

(non-flying) 


B 


B 


any 

major 

air 

command 


24 


24 


major 

air 

command 

to which 

assigned 


15 
days 


major ail 
commam 
to which 
assignee 


9 


MOARS Part III position 


* 


None 


CONAC 


24 





CONAC 





CONAC. 

or any 

major ail 

comman 


10 


MOARS Part 1 or Part III 


D 


D 


any 

major 

air 

command 








not 
applicable 


15 

days 

for Part I 

only 


any 

major 

air 

commam 


11 


MOARS position or unit as 
selective assignee. 


G 


None 


any 

major 

air 

command 








not 
applicable 





not 
applicabl 


12 


Ineligible Reserve Section 


G 


None 


CONAC 








not 
applicable 





not 
applicabl 


13 


MOARS Position 


H 


E 


any 

major 

air 

command 








not 
applicable 


30 


any 

major 

air 

comman 


14 


MOARS — non prior service enlistee 


None 


F 


CONAC 








CONAC 


minimum 
of 

four 
months 


Air Traini 
comman 
or 
CONAC 


'May 
(Info 
pay ( 


troin as individuals (USAF Acad 
rmation or Research and Develc 
)r 15-day training periods. 


emy Lia 
pment F 


son Of 

lights) 


icers or Juc 
and earn r« 


ige Advo 
?tiremen 


cate Ge 
t and r 


:neral Area Re 
Mention point 


presentative; 
; but are no 


;) or as in 
t eligible! 



The fourteen categories (below) correspond to those 
3n the opposite page and describe in greater detail the 
/arious Program Elements of the Air National Guard 
Hid Air Force Reserve along with the type units and 
ndividuals assigned to each. All programs listed here 
ire Ready Reserve programs. 



(1) Air Defense, Air Refueling, Air Transport, Tactical Fighter and 
'actical Reconnaissance Wings and Squadrons; Aircraft Control and 
Yarning Squadrons; Communications Groups and Squadrons; Commu- 
lications Maintenance Squadrons, (GEEIA) Ground Electronics Engi- 
teering Installations Agency, Mobile Communications and Communi- 
ations Maintenance Squadrons; Communications Groups and Squad- 
ons (Mobile); Tactical Control Groups and Weather Flights. 

(2) Units of Troop Carrier Wings, Air Rescue Squadrons; Mobile 
lommunications and Medical Units; Air Terminal and Air Postal Squad- 
ons; Censorship Squadron. 

(3) Navigation Training Units, Selective Service Squadron, (Members 
rain as individuals). 

(4) Positions which require frequent job proficiency inactive duty 
r aining and participation in flying activities. 

(5) Reservists assigned to Air Force Reserve Region and Sector Hqs. 

(6) Assignments which are unique to special requirements initiated 
nd specifically authorized by Hq USAF. 

(7) Includes Air Force Reserve Recovery Groups and Squadrons; Air 
ase Group and Squadron; Radiological Survey Squadron and Evacua- 
on Squadron. 

(8) Positions which require frequent job proficiency inactive duty 
aining but which do not require participation in flying activities. 

(9) Includes element training and other training required by CONAC 
) meet regularly scheduled Reserve programs. 

0) Positions which do not require inactive duty training to maintain 
ib proficiency. 

1) Includes personnel with prior service who possess a specialty 
ot available within the unit of assignment. Selective assignees do 
Dt train with their unit of assignment. Service in this category is 
'editable toward completion of a military service obligation but not 
ir transfer to the Standby Reserve. 

2) Includes obligors in the Ineligible Reserve Section who have not 
squested or accepted transfer to an active Reserve unit for partic- 
ation where a vacancy exists. Service in the category counts toward 
Dmpleting an MSO but not for transfer to the Standy Reserve. 

3) Mobilization assignees of Part I positions who require training 
id may be more effectively trained by performing active duty for 
aining instead of inactive duty training. 

4) Includes enlistees with no prior service. The four months active 
Jty training period consists of six weeks basic training at Lackland 
FB, Texas, and either attendance at a school for specialized training 
' an active assignment with a local Reserve unit with on-the-job 
aining in a specific career field. 



T 



he Air Reserve Forces must be able to provide immedi- 
ate augmentation for the active military establishment. 
In addition, Air National Guardsmen have a dual re- 
sponsibility to their respective state governors. 

All Air National Guardsmen (about 75,000) are 
Ready Reservists (see below). The Air Force Reserve 
has a total of about 320,000 members who are divided 
into various categories called Program Elements. As- 
signment to a specific Program Element is dependent 
upon factors such as availability of the individual, unit 
vacancies and requirements, budgetary limitations, and 
the amount of training required by the Reservist to 
maintain combat effectiveness. 

Following is a description of the major categories. A 
more detailed breakdown is contained in the accom- 
panying chart and in the glossary. 

• Ready Reservists: those who agree or are obli- 
gated to report for active duty at the call of the Presi- 
dent, the Congress or when otherwise authorized by 
law. Training of Air Force Reserve's Ready Reservists 
comes from several sources. Some are assigned to the 
Unit Training program. They train with a specific unit 
which is organized to serve on active duty as a complete, 
operational unit. Examples of such units are listed un- 
der Codes 1 and 2 of the accompanying chart. Other 
Ready Reservists train as individuals in MOARS (Mo- 
bilization Assignment Reserve Section). These mobili- 
zation assignees receive training with active duty units, 
activities or Air Force Reserve Recovery units. Their 
training and pay status varies and they are classed as 
Part I or Part III Reservists. 

Part I — Reservists assigned to one of the major air 
commands and receive their training from the assigned 
command. 

Part III — Reservists assigned to and administered 
by the Continental Air Command. 

• Standby Reservists: those who may be ordered 
to active duty only by Congress and when otherwise 
authorized by law. The Standby Reserve includes those 
Reservists assigned to NARS (Nonaffiliated Reserve 
Section) and ISLRS (Inactive Status List Reserve Sec- 
tion). Standby Reservists receive no pay for their 
training. 

• Retired Reservists: Includes all Reservists in a 
retired status. 



The following subjects are related directly to the 
Program Elements structure: 

• "Training" 

. . . page 9 

• "Units & Missions" 

...page 14 

• "Flexible Organization" 

...page 15 



li 



Gen. LOW from page 3 

proposals for changes in the manage- 
ment structure of the Reserve Forces. 
Based on what we saw and heard 
during our deliberations, we decided 
that achieving improvements in the 
Reserve program is a combination 
of organizational change and man- 
agement improvement. All of the 
elements are present to insure a con- 
stantly improving Reserve Program. 

I have seen a vast improvement in 
management — in just this past year 
that I have been in Headquarters 
USAF. The Air Staff is doing a good 
job of integrating the Reserves into 
Air Force planning, and they're get- 
ting better at it all the time. We can 
see and feel the major commands 
putting more and more emphasis on 
Reserve Forces — seriously searching 
for better methods and greater utili- 
zation. I am sure we're headed in the 
right direction. 

There are a lot of things we need 
and there are a lot more ways in 
which we could improve our pro- 
gram. But all of these cost money, 
and we just can't have everything 
we'd like. 

We used to operate on the theory 
that what we couldn't get for the Air 
Force, we might be able to get for the 
Reserve Forces. This theory has been 
expounded quite generally in discus- 
sion of the need for new aircraft. The 
fact is that there is only so much 
money available for the entire Air 
Force (Guard, Reserve and Active 
Forces). At the same time with this 
squeeze on funds the Air Force now 
looks more and more toward the Re- 
serve Forces as a means of carrying 
out its very great responsibilities. 

And because of this Air Force 
need for greater support by the Re- 
serves, we must make certain that we 
give the Air Force the most we can 
with the resources available to us. 

Whether we as individuals like it 
or not the world is changing, military 
forces are changing, and missions will 
change. We all have to be flexible. 
Missions and units that were valid 
five years ago may no longer have a 
part in our wartime forces. Each of 
us must be ready to face and accept 
new missions as they come along. I 
can promise you, that any changes 
made will represent sincere efforts to 
make every segment of our Reserve 
Forces answer the Air Force's urgent 
requirement: a requirement for an 
augmentation force which can pitch 
in and pull its weight to produce the 
greatest possible combat effective- 
nc< ZVj^_ 




n*i 1 




F-89 ANG Fighter Interceptor 



RB 57 ANG Tactical Reconnaissance 




- 








* 



v£^ 



C-124 AFRes Troop Carrier (Heavy) 



HU-16 AFRes Air Rescu 

ANG Air Commando 



12 




C-123 AFRes Troop Carrier (Assault) 
ANG Air Transport (Medium) 





C-121 ANG Air Transport (Heavy) 



F-84F ANG Tactical Fighter 



F-100 ANG Tactical Fighter 



13 



T 




he Air Reserve Forces have many training programs. 
A brief description of most of the Air Reserve Forces 
units follows. (Note: Alphabetical code indicates train- 
ing category and pay group authorized. See chart, page 
10 for meaning.) 

FLYING UNITS 

Each flying wing, separate group, or separate squad- 
ron is a complete, operational unit and includes all sup- 
porting elements necessary for its operation. 

AIR COMMANDO (AA)(ANG) Provide deployment 
(infiltration and exfiltration) of special troops. Units 
are mobile and may be deployed quickly in limited or 
general war situations. Capable of land and water 
drops of sensitive cargo and personnel, regardless of 
terrain. 

AIR DEFENSE (AA)(ANG) These units have a 
primary mission of identifying, intercepting and destroy- 
ing enemy airborne forces. They augment the Air De- 
fense Command. Many maintain a 24-hour alert and 
some provide the only air defense in the area. 

AIR REFUELING (AA)(ANG) Provide air-to-air 
refueling for ANG, Tactical Air Command and other 
forces as required. 

AIR RESCUE (AA)(AFRes) Augment the search and 
rescue forces of the Air Force. Supervised by the Mili- 
tary Air Transport Service. 

AIR TRANSPORT (AA)(ANG) Provide global air- 
lift capability under control of Military Air Transport 
Service. One medium air transport squadron provides 
airlift support for the Alaskan Air Command. 

TACTICAL FIGHTER (AA)(ANG) Maintain air 
supremacy, provide close air support of ground forces. 
Tactical Air Command is gaining command. 

TACTICAL RECONNAISSANCE (AA)(ANG) Per- 
form aerial photography, visual reconnaissance, and 
assist in adjustment of long range artillery firing for 
Air Defense Command. 

TROOP CARRIER (AA)(AFRes) Airlift and air- 
drop personnel and equipment and accomplish active 
force missions on training flights to overseas sites. 

NONFLYING SUPPORT UNITS: 

AIR TERMINAL (AA)(AFRes) Process passengers, 
cargo, and mail for all transport aircraft at assigned 
locations. Gaining command: Military Air Transport 
Service. 

AIRCRAFT CONTROL AND WARNING (FIXED) 

(AA)(ANG) Part of the air defense radar network, 
providing detection and aircraft control capability. 
Several furnish 24-hour support for Air Defense Com- 
mand and Pacific Air Forces. 

COMMUNICATIONS (MOBILE) (AA)(ANG) Using 
van-mounted radio voice, teletype, and telephone 
equipment, deploy to extend, supplement, or replace 
existing Air Force communications circuits and mes- 
sage handling services. 



COMMUNICATIONS MAINTENANCE. (AA)(A\G 

Have a mobile depot capability for on-site maintenance 
of group communications-electronic equipment. TraiJ 
ing consists of actual repair and maintenance of Aii 
Force equipment. 

GROUND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING IN. 
STALLATION AGENCY (AA)(ANG) Mobile unit* 
which install ground electronics and communications 
equipment. Field training includes actual installation^ 
at Air Force bases and stations. 

RECOVERY UNITS (BB)(AFRes) Enhance the suM 
vival capability of the Air Force in case of enemy 
attack and supervise the training of individual Re- 
servists. 

MEDICAL UNITS (AA)(ANG and AFRes) Includtfl 
USAF Hospitals, Aeromedical Evacuation Squadrons 
and Medical Service Units. 

MOBILE COMMUNICATIONS (AA)(ANG ano 

AFRes) Provide highly mobile communications anc 
navigational aids in support of Air Force Communica- 
tions Service requirements at unprepared flying strips 
or other bases. 

TACTICAL CONTROL (AA)(ANG) Contain ex 
tensive and complex communications and radar capa- 
bility to maintain control and status of all aircraft 
flying in their area of responsibility. Each group and 
its component units are essentially mobile and are 
capable of quick response to Air Force Communica- 
tions Service requirements for augmentation. 

WEATHER FLIGHTS (AA)(ANG) Have both fore- 
casting and observing capability to provide precise 
weather data to support flying units. (Augment Military 
Air Transport Service's Weather Service). 

AIR POSTAL (AA)(AFRes) Augment Regular Ah 
Force postal units in providing complete postal and 
security courier service within a given area. Units are 
assigned to CONAC during peacetime and in the event 
of mobilization are directed by the Postal and Security 
Courier Operations Division of Hq USAF. 

INFORMATION FLIGHTS (None) (AFRes) 

MOARS Part III Reservists assigned to the Informa- 
tion Flight program represent a source of valuable, 
assistance to Information Officers throughout the 
country. Duties involve public relations, advertising, 
journalism, broadcasting and related fields. 

JAGARS JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL AREA 
REPRESENTATIVES (None) (AFRes) MOARS 

Part III Reservist/lawyers who serve as individuals 
or groups to render legal assistance to Regular and 
Reserve personnel and to eligible dependents. 

AIR FORCE ACADEMY LIAISON OFFICERS 
(None) (AFRes) Act as representatives of the USAF 
Academy and assist in recruiting efforts. 

CIVIL DEFENSE Offers Standby Reserve officers ar 
opportunity to earn retirement points by helping CD 
meet its organizational planning, training and person- 
nel requirements. Program centers on community shel- 
ters and community action. Apply through local Civi 
Defense directors. 



u 



The Key: 



"Flexible" Organization 



A 






he Air Force Reserve and Air 
National Guard are organized, 
lanned, trained and equipped un- 
er policies established by the 
Jnited States Air Force, and all 
eserve units have a direct rela- 
ionship with one of the major air 
ommands of USAF. In the event 
f mobilization, Reserve units are 
>rogrammed to become active ele- 
lents of a specific major air com- 
nand, called the "gaining com- 
nand." During peacetime, opera- 
ional readiness inspections and the 
upervision of training are con- 
ucted by these commands: 

• Military Air Transport Service 

• Tactical Air Command 

• Air Defense Command 

• Air Force Communications 
Service 

• Pacific Air Force 

• Alaskan Air Command 

• Air Force Logistics Command 

• Continental Air Command 

• Other commands having Mo- 
bilization Assignees 

A general outline of the internal 
>rganizational structure of the Air 
orce Reserve and Air National 
iuard follows : 

AFRes 

The Air Force Reserve is com- 
nanded by the Continental Air 
Command of the U. S. Air Force. 
TONAC is made up of eight sub- 
irdinate commands. There are six 
Kk Force Reserve Regions, the Air 
Reserve Records Center, and the 
Tivil Air Patrol— USAF. 

The Regions provide intermedi- 



ate supervisory control of all Re- 
serve activities in their areas. Be- 
low the Regions are the Reserve fly- 
ing units and sixteen Reserve Sec- 
tors which are responsible for all 
nonflying units. Management of the 
Region and Sector headquarters is 
accomplished partly by Reservists 
and partly by Regular Air Force 
personnel. Units subordinate to the 
Regions and Sectors are manned en- 
tirely by Reservists. 

The Air Reserve Records Center 
maintains master records for ap- 
proximately one third of a million 
Air Force Reservists. 

Civil Air Patrol is an auxiliary of 
the U. S. Air Force under CONAC 
and is organized and manned by 
over 75,000 civilian volunteers. In 
addition to its primary search and 
rescue mission, the Civil Air Patrol 
conducts a nationwide aerospace 
education program and an interna- 
tional air cadet exchange program. 

The Air Reserve Technician Pro- 
gram (ART) of the Air Force Re- 
serve achieves maximum combat 
readiness and effectiveness of Air 
Force Reserve flying wings. 

ART combines Federal Civil 
Service employment with active Re- 
serve participation. Reserve techni- 
cians serve as civilian AF employees 
during the standard work week, then 
don AF uniforms for Reserve train- 
ing periods. 

The program is based on the 
need for a "cadre" or "hard-core" 
of highly skilled, permanent, stabil- 
ized Reserve personnel immediately 
available to the Air Force Reserve 
wings during an emergency or in the 



event of national mobilization. 

ANG 

The Air National Guard is the 
air arm of the National Guard and 
performs a dual mission. When not 
federalized, the Air National Guard 
represents a force at the disposal of 
the state governor in his efforts to 
preserve the peace and protect the 
health and welfare of the com- 
munity. When federalized, Air Na- 
tional Guard units become active 
elements of their assigned USAF 
major air command. The Chief, Na- 
tional Guard Bureau, reports to the 
Department of the Air Force 
through the Chief of Staff, U. S. Air 
Force. The National Guard Bureau 
is the official channel of communi- 
cation to all Air National Guard 
units through the State Adjutants 
General. The National Guard Bu- 
reau controls the funds, equipment 
and manpower of the various Air 
Guard units and also controls how 
these resources will be used in ef- 
fecting approved Air Force pro- 
grams for the ANG. 

Less than 20 percent of ANG 
personnel are Air Technicians: full 
time state civilian employees who 
are also military members of the 
unit and attend weekend drills and 
summer training encampments in 
their military status. The officer and 
airmen Air Technicians fill full time 
and technical supervisory positions 
which are required to keep units 
sufficiently operational for training 
purposes. They provide guidance 
during training and maintain con- 
tinuity between training periods. 



Hq 
CONAC 



Individual 
Training 
Program 



AIR FORCE RESERVE 



Hq 
USAF 








Assistant Chief of 
Staff for 








Reserve Forces 



USAF 

Major 

Commands 



*SfV' 






AFRes 
Units 



i AFRes Units 
mobilized 
I 



Mobilization 
Assignees 







AIR NATIONAL GUARD 








NATIONAL 
GUARD 
BUREAU 




Hq 
USAF 




Assistant 
Chief of Staff 

for 
Reserve Forces 




























State 
Governors 




USAF 

Major 

Commands 










c 












ANG 
UNITS 




ANG 

UNITS 

Mobilized 



















15 




Answers to questions frequently asked about the Air Reserve Forces 



Is it possible to make good retirement years 
while in the Standby Reserve? I am now in the 
Ready Reserve and have completed ten good 
years of Ready Reserve service. Would it be 
possible for me to transfer to Standby Reserve, 
make good retirement years by completing ECI 
courses then apply for retirement with pay after 
completing the required number of years? Points 
earned in either a Ready or Standby status are credit- 
able for Reserve retirement. They may be earned 
through extension course participation with assign- 
ment to the Nonaffiliated Reserve Section (NARS). 
Such an assignment places you in Standby status. Pro- 
vided eligibility requirements are met, application for 
retired pay may be made from this status. Eligibility 
criteria must include: attainment of age 60; completion 
of 20 years satisfactory service of which the last eight 
were earned in a Reserve capacity; and active duty 
during World War I, World War II or the Korean 
conflict if a member of an Armed Force Reserve be- 
fore August 16, 1945. Any satisfactory service earned 
while assigned to NARS (50 points per year) will be 
counted toward the 20 years required to qualify for 
retired pay. 

Does my employer have to give me time off in 
addition to my regular vacation to attend sum- 
mer encampment? Does he have to pay me for 
that extra time off? There is no law which requires 
an employer to give you additional time off or to 
pay you for periods of Reserve training. Many lead- 
ers of business and industry realize the defense value 
of a strong Reserve Force to the nation and to the 
community and offer such benefits. Federal employees 
are granted 15-days military leave with pay to attend 
summer encampments. This is in addition to their an- 
nual vacation period. 

Are members of the Reserve components eligible 
to fly on Air National Guard aircraft? Yes. Re- 
serve component personnel in uniform, with proper 
identification, may ride as passengers in ANG or 
AFRes aircraft on a "space available basis" and 
"within Continental limits of U.S.," provided the air- 
craft is on a duly scheduled training flight or on a 
strictly military mission. Reservists cannot use mili- 
tary transport for private business. 

After completing 20 years of satisfactory serv- 
ice either on active duty or as a mobilization as- 
signee, I requested that I be reassigned to NARS. 
I plan to continue to earn retirement points 
through extension courses. Assuming that I meet 
other requirements, am I eligible for promotion 
to a higher grade? Yes. To be eligible for promotion 
consideration a Reservist officer must be in an active 
status. This means being assigned to an active pro- 
gram element and accruing at least 15 earned points 
within your retirement year. Assignment to NARS 
with participation through ECI courses would fulfill 
this requirement. 

How may an airman on active duty with the 



16 



Personnel records of all Air National Guard 
officers are maintained at National Guard Bureau 
headquarters, the Pentagon, Washington 25, DC. 
The records of ANG enlisted members are main- 
tained at the respective state headquarters. The 
Air Reserve Records Center, 3800 York St., Den- 
ver 5, Colo. 80205, maintains the personnel rec- 
ords of all Air Force Reserve officers (except gen- 
eral officers) and airmen not in active military 
service. Questions should be forwarded to either 
of the above addresses. They should include full 
name, rank, service number, return address and 
complete details. 



Regular Air Force make application for a com 
mission in the Air Force Reserve, or apply fo 
a course to qualify him for commission? Air Fore' 
enlisted personnel on active duty may apply througl, 
their immediate commander to Continental Air Com! 
mand or, if stationed overseas, to the major corn 
mander having jurisdiction over the area in which he 
is stationed. However, direct appointments in the Ai! 
Force Reserve are currently restricted to individual 
qualified in the medical, chaplain and legal fields. W^ 
suggest you contact your unit commander for infor 
mation concerning a school or further requirement] 
for a commission. 

/ am an Air Force Reservist assigned to a troof 
carrier unit. Can I obtain a conditional release 
in order to transfer to the Air National Guard 

You may request a conditional release for the pur' 
pose of transferring to the ANG. Processing proce; 
dures are contained in paragraph 10c, AFR 45-35] 
Release of members of the Air Force Reserve (no 
on extended active duty) for transfer to the ANG foj 
the sole convenience of the individual is not author 
ized, and such transfer must be necessary and in thr 
best interests of the Air Force. 

Can a retired Air Force officer or enlisted mai 
become a member of the National Guard? Ai| 

Force policy does not permit retired officers to bj 
members of the Ready Reserve. Retired Airmen ii 
highly critical skill areas may be members of th| 
Ready Reserve with Air Force approval. Currentrj 
only Flight Engineer Technician, AFSC 43570, an 
approved for the Air Force Reserve. 

I am a Standby Reservist with assignment to Hq 
CON AC (NARS) ARRC. My term of service wii 
expire soon. Can I be reenlisted into the Inactivt] 
Reserve? Provided you are fully qualified for reeri 
listment in the Air Force Reserve in accordance wit! 
AFR 45-47, as amended, and during your last rd 
tention year you have earned 15 points, exclusive o 
gratuitous points, you may be reenlisted into thl 
NARS. Such enlistment must be accomplished no 
later than the day following your expiration term a 
service date. Thereafter reenlistment may be for 
Ready Reserve position only. 



R 



E 



G 



U 



L 







N 



S 



Reservists may find the following condensation of 
:urrent Air National Guard and Air Force regulations 
1 handy reference. Due to space limitations, only those 
ieemed pertinent to Reservists, have been included. 

Policy regarding personnel administration within the 
\ir Reserve Forces is contained in Air Force Manual 
35-3, dated October 1, 1963. Provisions of that manual 
.upersede any conflicting policies or procedures which 
nay be presently contained in ANG or AF publica- 
ions or messages previously issued. Existing publica- 
ions are being revised. 



Air Force Regulation 0-2, numerically lists all cur- 
ent publications. Following are some of the more 
lertinent regulations: 

Organization and Mission: "Continental Air 
Command." 

Personnel: "Issue and Control of Identifica- 
tion Cards." 

"Service Dates, Air Reserve Forces." 
"Assistance to Reserve and Air National Guard 
Recruiting Programs." 

"Mission, Composition, and Program Ele- 
ments of Reserve Components." 
"National Guard Bureau." 
"Responsibilities for Training, Inspection, Safe- 
ty Programs, Air Reserve Forces Units." 
"Air Reserve Forces Policy Committee." 
"Air Force Reserve Inactive Duty Training 
Pay and Allowances." 
"Tours of Active Duty." 
"Point-Gaining Activities for AF Reservists." 
"Voluntary Entry on EAD of Warrant Officer 
and Enlisted Reservists." 
"Reserve Component Representation on Air 
Force Staffs." 

"Evaluating Performance of Reserve Officers 
not on EAD." 

"Voluntary Entry of Officers on EAD." 
"Retention Program for AF Reserve Airmen." 
"Ready Reserve Officer Retention Program." 
"Wearing of Uniform by Air Technicians." 
"Ready Reserve Programs for Personnel With- 
out Prior Military Service." 
"Assignment and Promotion of Air Force Re- 
serve General Officers." 

"Military Service Obligations and Transfer Be- 
tween the Armed Services and Between Re- 
serve Components of the Air Force." 
"Authorization for Inactive Duty Training." 
"Discharge of Officers of Air Force Reserve by 
Reason of Misconduct or Inefficiency." 
"Administrative Separation of Officer Mem- 
bers of the Air Force Reserve." 
"Resignation." 

"Administrative Discharge of Airmen Mem- 
bers of the Air Force Reserve." 
"Enlistment and Reenlistment in the Air Force 
Reserve." 



53-1 

JO-20 

55-3 
J9-35 

15-1 

15-2 
15-6 

15-9 
15-10 

15-14 
15-15 

15-21 

15-22 
[5-24 

15-26 

15-27 
15-28 

15-32 
15-33 

15-34 

15-35 



15-37 
15-40 

15-41 

15-42 
15-43 

15-47 



45-48 "Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps." 
45-50 "Promotion of AF Reserve Officers to Fill 

Unit and Mobilization Assignment Grade Va- 
cancies." 
45-58 "AFROTC Flight Instruction Program." 
45-60 "Programming, Equipping, and Maintaining 

the Capability of Ready Reserve Forces." 
45-61 "Emergency Orders." 
50-5 "Physical Conditioning." 
50-11 "Training of Individual Reservists to Meet Air 

Force Requirements." 
50-15 "Code of Conduct." 
50-35 "Reservists of One Service Training With 

Units of Other Services." 
50-41 "Air Force Reserve School and Special Tour 

Training Programs." 
76-6 "Responsibilities and Policies for Movement of 

Traffic on Other Than MATS Aircraft." 
76-7 "Operation of Air Force Terminals." 
145-15 Commissaries: "Individuals and Organizations 

Authorized Commissary Store Privileges." 
190-25 "Biographies of High-Level and Distinguished 

Personnel." 



The following are extracted from Air National 
Guard Regulation 0-2, dated December 1 , 1963. They 
are of specific interest to Air Guardsmen. 



20-1 

23-01 
35-01 

35-07 
35-09 

35-4 
36-01 



36-02 

36-03 

36-04 

36-05 
36-08 
36-014 

36-10 
39-09 

39-4 

39-10 

39-29 

50-01 

50-02 

50-03 

50-04 

50-05 
50-07 
60-2 

177-01 
177-04 



Organization and Mission: "Air National 
Guard." 

"Headquarters, State Air National Guard." 
"Retirement." 
"Classification of Airmen." 
"Ordering ANGUS Personnel to Active Duty 
For Training in Federal Status." 
"Trophies and Awards." 

"Federal Recognition of General Officer Ap- 
pointment or Promotion in the ANG and Ap- 
pointment or Promotions as a Reserve of the 
AF." 

"Federal Recognition of Appointment in the 
ANG and Appointment as Reserve of the AF." 
"Federal Recognition Examining Boards for 
Appointment or Promotion in the ANG." 
"Federal Recognition of Promotion in the 
ANG and Promotion as Reserve of the AF." 
"Separation of ANG Officers." 
"Voluntary Entry Into Active Fed. Service." 
"Discharge of Officers of the ANG for Mis- 
conduct or Inefficiency." 

"Training Performance and Training Report." 
"Enlistment and Reenlistment in the ANG and 
as a Reserve of the Air Force." 
"Airmen On-The-Job Upgrade Training." 
"Discharge." 

"Promotion and Demotion of Airmen." 
Training: "General." 
"Unit Training Assemblies." 
"Field Training." 

"Military Orientation of Nonprior Service 
Airmen." 

"Service Schools and Related Training." 
"Additional Inactive Duty Flying Training." 
"USAF Rated Personnel Flying Air National 
Guard Aircraft." 

"Travel During Inactive Duty Training." 
"Travel During Active Duty Training." 



'.;•< 






17 



It's Good Business to Support 

the Air Reserve Forces 




. . Good for Industry 



Always among the first to rally to national 
defense in perilous times, many business and 
industrial leaders have done much to encourage 
participation in the activities of the Air Reserve 
Forces. They give this support, not only be- 
cause they recognize the value of strong Air 
Reserve Forces for the protection of our coun- 
try, but because they have found that the 
majority of Air Reservists and Air National 
Guardsmen are top flight employees. 

There are a number of ways an employer 
can support the Air Reserve Forces. Among 
them: 

• Grant employees leave in addition to their 
vacations for annual Reserve tours of duty for 
training, special tours of duty or emergency 
duty, with full salary, or the difference between 
military pay and company pay. 

• Establish and make known to his organ- 
izational associates, personnel policies designed 
to avoid company practices which might tend 
to discriminate against Reservists because of| 
the military affiliation. 

• Assist Reservists in making scheduled in- 
active duty drills and tours of active duty for| 
training. 

• Support Reserve activities through the usel 
of such facilities as bulletin boards, meetind 
rooms, training aids, transportation, company 
news media, exhibits, and advertising in news-j 
papers, radio, television and other media. 

Only through the understanding and cooper- 
ation of the leaders in business and industry I 
can the Air Reserve Forces maintain theiil 
"Ready Now" status which is essential to oui. 
national security. 



18 





. . . Good for the Family and Community 



1 he burden of national security is not solely 
the military man's — it is everyone's! The full 
support of family and community is needed 
to keep the Reservist a ready and capable 
member of America's defense force. 

Obviously, the Air Reserve Forces are a fam- 
ily affair, and the benefits of participation are 
as advantageous to the family and community 
as they are to the Reservist. Added income 
and the prospect of increased financial security 
after retirement are examples of tangible fam- 
ily benefits. There are others: an expanded so- 
cial life built on new friends, new club and 
recreational facilities and new interests; and, 
the pride of association with an organization 
that contributes to the welfare and protection 



of the community and the nation. 

Some Air Force Reserve and Air National 
Guard units sponsor women's Reserve auxiliary 
programs encouraging wives, friends and fe- 
male relatives to become active and contribut- 
ing partners in the Air Reserve Forces. Such 
family identification with the Air Reserve units 
and their missions, equipment and personnel, 
lends the moral support required to increase 
unit effectiveness. 

Wives and friends of members of the Air 
Reserve Forces are invited to participate in 
these family activities. Unit Information Offi- 
cers may be contacted for details concerning 
such programs. 



19 



Aed 



lif "& "& Applicants should contact the nearest 
Air Force Reserve or Air National Guard unit, listed 
in the telephone directory under "U.S. Government," 
or write to the Air Reserve Records Center, 3800 York 
St., Denver, Colorado (80205) or the Adjutant General 
at the appropriate state capital. 



Air Force Reserve ... 

Air Force Reserve's approximately 1,100 units are 
spread across the Nation. Each unit relies heavily 
upon the skills and training of its members, and in 
most there are position vacancies which must be filled. 
Men with prior service are needed for these units to 
maintain their combat effectiveness and to increase 
their augmentation value to the U. S. Air Force. Also, 
there are numerous openings for men with no prior 
military service. The following is a listing of critical 
shortages by career field and Air Force Specialty Code. 

OFFICER 

1035 Pilot, Search Rescue 

1055 Pilot, Troop Carrier 

1435 Air Operations 

1535 Navigator 

1634 Air Traffic Controller 

3034 Communications 

4344 Aircraft Maintenance 

5526 Base Engineer 

6044 Transportation 

6424 Supply 

6724 Accounting and Finance 

6736 Budget 

7016 Administrative Staff 

7024 Administrative 

9016 Medical Administrative Staff 

9025 Medical Administrative 

9035 Medical Supply 

9326 Medical, General 

9356 Medical, Aerospace Medicine 

9716 Nurse, Administrative 

9754 Nurse, General 

9826 Dental, General 

9926 Veterinary, General 

AIRMAN 

204X0 Intelligence Operations 

24 1X0 A Safety 

271X0 Air Operations 

272X0 Air Traffic Control 

274X0 Command Post 

291X0 Communications Center 

A293X2 Airborne Radio 

293X0 Ground Radio Operations 

301X0 Aircraft Radio Repair ; 

301X1 Aircraft Electronic Navigational Equipment Repair 

303X1 Air Traffic Control Radar Repair 

304X0 Radio Relay Equipment Repair 

304X1 Flight Facilities Equipment Repair 

304X4 Ground Radio Comm Equipment Repair 

361X0 Outside Wire & Antenna Systems (Installation and 

Maintenance) 
363X0 Communication & Relay Center Equipment Repair 

(F.lectro-Mechanical) 
421X1 Aircraft Propeller Repair 
421X2 Aircraft Pneudraulic Repair 
421X3 Aerospace Ground Equipment Repair 
422X0 Instrument Repair 

422X1 Mechanical Accessories & Equipment Repair 
423X0 Aircraft Electrical Repair 
424X0 Aircraft Fuel Systems Mechanic 
431X1A Aircraft Mechanical (Reciprocating Engine) 
432X1 Reciprocating Engine Mechanic 
43570 Flight Engineer Technican 
461X0 Munitions 
471X1 Automotive Repair 
542X02 Electrician 
545X0 Refrigeration 
551X0 Roads and Grounds 



552X0 Woodworker 

563X0 Water & Waste Processing 

565X0 Heating 

571X0 Fire Protection 

582X0 Fabric, Leather & Rubber Products 

602X0 Passenger & Household Goods 

603X0A Vehicle Operator 

605X0 Air Passenger Transportation 

605X1 Air Freight 

606X0 Flight Traffic 

607X0 Aircraft Loadmaster 

622X0 Cook/Food Service 

643X0A Fuel (Conventional) 

645X0 Inventory Management 

646X0 Organizational Supply 

647X0 Warehousing 

671X0 Accounting & Finance 

685X0 Data Processing Machine Operator 

702X0 Administrative 

702X1 Postal 

704X0 Stenographic 

732X0B Personnel 

751X0 Education 

771X0 Air Police 

901X0 Aeromedical 

902X0B Medical Service 

902X2 Operating Room 

902X8 Psychiatric Ward 

903X0 Radiology Specialist 

904X0B Medical Laboratory 

905X0 Pharmacy 

906X0 Medical Administration 

906X1 Medical Materiel 

907X0 Preventive Medicine 

908X0 Veterinary 

921X0A Rescue & Survival 

92250A Personal Equipment 

981X0 Dental Specialist 



Air National Guard ... 

Air National Guard units are located in every State 
Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia. Results o 
the past year's concentrated recruiting efforts hav 
brought some units up to 100 percent manning, bu 
there still are many units in need of skilled personnel 
Listed below are the most critical officer and enliste. 
vacancies existing within the Air National Guard: 

OFFICER 

Pilots and navigators with prior military service at\ 
needed by many of Air National Guard's flying unit. 
Former rated officers with the rank of second lieuter 
ant through major are requested to apply for membei 
ship with their local Air National Guard unit. 

AIRMAN 

622X0 Food Services 

291X0 Communications Center Specialist 

571X0 Fire Protection Specialist 

771X0 Air Policeman 

273X0 Aircraft Control & Warning Operator 

304X0 Radio Relay Equipment Repairman 

304X4 Ground Radio Communications Equipment 

Repairman 
421X3 Aerospace Ground Equipment Repairman 
43 1X1 A Aircraft Mechanic (Reciprocating Engine) 
432X0 Aircraft Mechanic (Jet Engine) 
646X0 Supply Specialist 



20 



g|l ojs s[a r]y 

kCTIVE DUTY FOR TRAINING: A tour of active 
uty for training under orders which provide for auto- 
latic return to inactive duty upon completion. Exam- 
le: the annual 15-day "summer encampment." 

.CTIVE STATUS: The status of all members of the 
iir Reserve Forces except those asigned to ISLRS* 
r the Retired Reserve Section. 

dR RESERVE FORCES: The Air National Guard 
f the United States and the Air Force Reserve. 

EAD) EXTENDED ACTIVE DUTY: Tour of full 
me duty in the active military service performed by 
member of the Air Reserve Forces. 

JAINING COMMAND: The major air command to 
'hich a unit or individual of the Ready Reserve is 
ssigned in the event of mobilization. 

VACTIVE DUTY TRAINING: Training performed 
y a member of the Air Reserve Forces while not on 
:tive duty. Examples: unit training assemblies- 
nrespondence courses. 

SLRS) INACTIVE STATUS LIST RESERVE SEC- 
ION: A program element made up of AF Reservists 
ho do not meet the requirements for active status (15 
irned points per year not counting gratuitous points), 
eviewed annually to determine whether Reservists are 
i be retained or discharged. 

RS) INELIGIBLE RESERVE SECTION: A pro- 
•am element containing those AF Reservists who have 
Dt completed their Reserve obligation and who do not 
jluntarily participate in Reserve training programs. 

4SO) MILITARY SERVICE OBLIGATION: The 

:riod, required by law, which a person must serve as 
Regular or Reserve of the Armed Services. 

[ANDATORY ASSIGNEE: A draft deferred in- 
vidual who has served on active duty for less than 12 
onths and has a remaining military service obligation, 
e may be involuntarily assigned to a Ready Reserve 
)sition and is required to meet statuatory participa- 
>n requirements of the program element assigned. 

INIMUM PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS: 

le least number of points a member of the Air Re- 
rve Forces must earn annually for retention within 
iy program element to which he is assigned. 

OBILIZATION ASSIGNEE: An Air Force Re- 
rvist not on extended active duty who is assigned 
a MOARS* position. 

jlOARS) MOBILIZATION ASSIGNMENT RE- 
]RVE SECTIONS: Administrative sections of major 
r commands and their subordinate units which moni- 
r assigned Air Force Reserve Part I and Part III 
anpower spaces. 



(NARS) NONAFFILIATED RESERVE SECTION: 

A program element consisting of Standby Reservists 
not assigned to any other active status program ele- 
ment, or who are not in an inactive or retired Reserve 
status. AF Reservists in NARS must earn at least 15 
points each retention year to remain in that program. 

NONOBLIGOR: A member of the Air Reserve Forces 
who does not have a military service obligation. 

NONPRIOR SERVICE: In general, an individual who 
has never served on active duty. 

OBLIGOR: A member of the Air Reserve Forces who 
has a military service obligation. 

PROGRAM ELEMENT: Any program within the 
active status portion of the Air Reserve Forces which 
is identified by training category and pay group. 

RESERVIST: Refers to members of the Air National 
Guard or Air Force Reserve. 

READY RESERVIST: A member of the Air Reserve 
Forces occupying a unit or individual mobilization posi- 
tion who may be ordered to extended active duty 
involuntarily in time of War or National emergency 
declared by Congress or the President, or when other- 
wise authorized by law. 

SERVICE OBLIGATION: The length of time that an 
individual must, by law, serve as a member of a regular 
or Reserve component of an Armed Service. 

SELECTIVE ASSIGNEE: A Reserve obligor in- 
voluntarily assigned to a vacant Ready Reserve posi- 
tion because of recent active duty training in a particu- 
lar specialty. He is not required to perform inactive 
duty training and is utilized only to meet mobilization 
requirements in the event of an emergency. 

TRAINING CATEGORY: A classification which in- 
dicates the amount of training required by units and 
individuals to maintain proficiency. (A list of the vari- 
ous training categories is printed on page 11). 

STANDBY RESERVIST: An AF Reservist, not in the 
Ready or Retired Reserve, who may be ordered to ex- 
tended active duty involuntarily only in time of War 
or National emergency declared by Congress, or when 
otherwise authorized by law. 

YEAR OF SERVICE FOR RETENTION: That 12 
consecutive months period during which a Reservist 
must earn a minimum of 1 5 points (exclusive of gratui- 
tous points) in order to be retained as an active Re- 
servist. 

YEAR OF SERVICE FOR RETIREMENT: That 12 
consecutive months period during which a member of 
the Air Reserve Forces must accrue a minimum of 50 
points, (35 earned and 15 gratuitous)if such period is 
to be credited as a year of satisfactory federal service 
for retirement purposes. 



Note: To avoid duplication, definitions of the 
Ready and Standby Reserve, Part I and Part III 
and Retired Reservists have not been included. 
They can be found in the section pertaining to 
Program Elements, page 11. 



21 




rce Point of View 



"The Air Force thinks of the 

Air National Guard and the Air Force 

Reserve in the same manner as it 

does of its regular units. 

As nearly as possible, we expect the 

same rapid response from 

them because they are subjected to 

identical operational readiness 

tests. We need a 

Ready Now combat capability in 

the Air Reserve Forces 

because we depend on them to 

augment the active force in times of crises." 



u 



General Curtis E. LeMay, 

Chief of Staff, USAF 



ntil a few years ago the Air Force, like the other 
United States military services, traditionally had relied 
on its Reserve components to supply the extra man- 
power and capability needed for wartime expansion. 
But today, our Air Reserve Forces — the Air National 
Guard and the Air Force Reserve — are much more 
than a wartime mobilization force; they are, in fact, 
a vital part of the aerospace force in-being. 

The varied missions assigned to the Air Force are 
so broad in scope they can be accomplished only by a 
completely responsive, instantly reacting, highly flexible 
aerospace force. 

In the early 1950s, the Air Force realized that its 
requirement for Reserve augmentation could not be 
met with the traditional concept of Reserves — a pool of 
manpower from which it could draw to expand its 
active forces. It found that the flexibility and immediate 
reaction capability required of active Air Force units 
must also exist in the Reserve Forces if they are to be 
effective. Its need was for Air Reserve Forces units 
organized and trained to perform specific wartime tasks. 
These forces have to be capable of responding within 
a few hours instead of the traditional weeks or months. 
They have to be ready for D-day — every day. 

As our new Reserve concept took shape, there was 
a growing awareness within the Air Force of the exist- 
ing and potential capabilities of the Air National Guard 
and the Air Force Reserve. This awareness was coupled 
with a realization of how much real Reserve capabili- 
ties would mean to an Air Force beset by rising costs 
and static budgets. The capabilities of Reserve Force 
units were written into Air Force war plans. Flying 
units were equipped with aircraft suitable for accom- 
plishing wartime tasks. Soon, members of the Air Re- 



22 



serve Forces adopted the term "Ready Now" to dc 
scribe the results of this increased emphasis on full 
trained, mission-capable forces. And the Air Ford 
put its "Ready Now" Reserve Forces to work. 

Units began performing peacetime Air Force mil 
sions to make their training as realistic as possiblJ 
Troop carrier units moved high-priority cargo whi] 
training their personnel in airlift skills. 

Fighter and reconnaissance units supported joil 
Army and Air Force exercises. Air defense units fie 
intercept missions under active Air Force control. 

Methods of management were improved. Air Ford 
commands were made responsible for supervising trj 
training of those Reserve Forces units which would t| 
assigned to them in wartime. Standards of perforn 
ance for active and Reserve units were made identic^ 
Each aircrew, regardless of component, was required ' 
meet the same rigid requirements before it could I 
designated "combat ready." 

These rather revolutionary Air Force concepts f« 
Reserve Forces proved their validity in the fall of 196 
This was during the Berlin crisis when the Preside' 
ordered to active duty a number of Air National Gua 
and Air Force Reserve units. 

Soon after they reported for duty, seven fight 
squadrons, a tactical reconnaissance squadron, and 
complete tactical control group were enroute to Europ 
The other recalled units were integrated into Tactic 
Air Command and Military Air Transport Service un 
in the U. S., prepared for immediate deployment. Mo 
than 200 single-engine jet aircraft were flown to Euro; 
by their citizen-airmen pilots. The deployment, largf 1 
of its kind ever attempted, was completed in reco 
time, and without a single accident. 

Three additional fighter squadrons, called to acti 
duty on November 1, began the move to Europe 
days later. These units were equipped with the F-1C 
"the missile with a man in it." The first of these thr 1 
squadrons to complete the move was standing 24-ho 
alert at Moron Air Base, Spain, two weeks later. 

Air National Guard heavy transport wings and A 
Force Reserve troop carrier wings were mobilized J 
October 1, and soon their C-97s and C-124s were flyij 
missions for Tactical Air Command and the Milita 
Air Transport Service, not only within the U. S. t 
to the Far East, Europe, and other overseas areas. 



Air Force Reserve practical training adds 
"Ready Now" support to the active forces. 





Refueling capability of ANG tactical jets 
makes rapid overseas deployments possible. 



jeneral Curtis E. LeMay, Air Force Chief of Staff, 
nmed up the performance of the Air Reserve Forces 
these words: "Never before has the United States 

Force depended so heavily upon the ability of the 

National Guard and the Air Force Reserve to re- 
md so quickly and effectively. Never before have the 

Reserve Forces met a challenge with such speed 
1 efficiency." 

Ex-chancellor Konrad Adenauer of the Federal Re- 
)lic of Germany wrote to the late President Ken- 
[y that, in his opinion, the prime factor influencing 
rushchev in his slowdown on the Berlin crisis was 

swift, decisive buildup of American forces, includ- 

the fighter units deployed to Europe, 
["he President of the United States congratulated the 

Force on "the outstanding contribution to the cause 
freedom made by its Reserve Forces during this 
ical time." 

iardly had the Reserve Forces units recalled for the 
lin contingency returned to their homes when a 
/trouble spot appeared. On October 22, 1962, the 
sident alerted the world to the existence of a Soviet 
Idup of offensive missiles in Cuba. Late on the 
W of October 27, eight Air Force Reserve troop 
rier wings and six AF Reserve aerial port squadrons 
e ordered to active duty. 

rhis swiftest of Reserve mobilizations since the 
lerican Revolution saw 93 percent of the personnel 
the recalled units present for duty, with optimum 
national readiness of aircraft, 24 hours after the 
ler was issued. Secretary of Defense Robert S. 
Namara said: "This was a fantastic performance." 
d he continued, "this is the standard of performance 
t has been built into the Air Force's Reserve and 
ard programs." 

Jut the story of the Air Reserve Forces in the Cuba 
■is was more than the story of the mobilized units, 
ny units and thousands of individuals who were not 
ered to active duty performed vital missions during 
i emergency. Air National Guard tactical fighter 
adrons were standing ready — within a telephone 

of active duty. 

Mr Force Reserve recovery units at civilian airports 
I unused airstrips supported dispersal and deploy- 
it operations of Strategic Air Command, Air De- 



fense Command, and other Air Force major commands 
as well as Army tactical units. Many Air National 
Guard and Air Force Reserve bases also supported 
dispersal of our combat forces. 

Air Force Reserve troop carrier squadrons flew many 
supply and resupply missions before and after the 
active duty period. Air National Guard heavy trans- 
port squadrons fitted their overwater training flights into 
the worldwide system of Military Air Transport Service, 
flying essential cargo and filling gaps left by MATS' 
concentration on direct support of Cuba crisis action. 
These tasks were performed by volunteer personnel of 
the Air Reserve Forces who were not ordered to active 
duty but, as General LeMay expressed it, practically 
came on active duty anyway, to help where they could. 
"This," he said, "is my idea of a real Reserve unit." 

This in-being capability of the Air Reserve Forces 
continues to pay dividends in productive effort for the 
Air Force. During Fiscal Year 1963, Air Force Re- 
serve aircraft were responsible for the movement of 
almost 10,000 passengers and approximately 9.5 mil- 
lion pounds of cargo for the Air Force. The Air Force 
Reserve provided more than half of Tactical Air Com- 
mand's support of Army airborne training during the 
past Fiscal Year and airdropped more than 100,000 
troops in exercises and training. 

Air National Guard air transport squadrons and Air 
Force Reserve troop carrier squadrons committed to 
the Military Air Transport Service are required to per- 
form overwater training flights along MATS routes. 
When MATS cargo is carried on such flights, all mem- 
bers of the crew get realistic training. The extra airlift 
which they provide for MATS is clear profit for the 
nation. Between January 1 and June 30, 1963, sixteen 
Air National Guard C-97 squadrons airlifted more than 
6.5 million pounds of MATS cargo overseas. 

The Air National Guard makes a substantial contri- 
bution to the nation's air defense. Each of the 25 ANG 
interceptor squadrons keeps two aircraft and four air- 
crews on active duty runway alert around-the-clock, 
performing air defense intercept missions under Air 
Force control. 

The capability of the Air Reserve Forces is certainly 
a factor in any potential enemy's assessment of our total 
military strength. 

In October 1961 General LeMay stated, "It is pretty 
obvious that the regular establishment forces can't do 
all the job — today or in the future. I see a continuing 
need for ready Reserve Forces that can pitch in and 
help the active units." This is just as true today. 

Successful manning of Reserve Forces units, there- 
fore, depends in large measure on the attitudes of the 
business and civic leaders of locai communities. Man- 
ning required for the essential Reserve Forces readiness 
can be achieved only if the members of the Reserve 
Forces are supported by their employers, their families, 
and all those with whom they come in contact. 

The late President Kennedy, speaking of the meaning 
of the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, said "There is no 
cause for complacency. We have learned in times past 
that the spirit of one moment or place can be gone in 
the next. We have been disappointed more than once, 
and we have no illusions now that there are shortcuts 
on the road to peace. At many points around the 
globe the Communists are continuing their efforts to 
exploit weakness and poverty. Their concentration of 
nuclear and conventional arms must still be deterred." 







23 




DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER 5, COLORADO 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 






reserve earner e 



■ 



Reserve training Hikes many avenues. It is varied and diverse, 
running the gamut from basic marksmanship to the intricacies 
of space age problems. Here is a sampling :QM A RKSM A 
SHIP—A2C Ronald P. Herzig of Air Force Reserve's 434th 
Troop Carrier IVing. Bakalar AFB. Indiana, recently outscored 
over 1,000 Reservists during unit's marksmanship training 
program. Airman Herzig fired 298 out of a possible 300. 
Q OVERSEAS FLIGHTS — In the foreground, TSgt. 
Charles H. Wright (I) and Major Bobby E. Wells, 125th Air 
Transport Sq., Tulsa, Oklahoma, supervise loading of medical 
supplies aboard their Air National Guard C-97 aircraft at 
ton AFB, California. Their flight to Bangkok, Thailand, 
combined training in Military Air Transport Service proce- 
dures with accomplishing an Air Force mission: transporting 
supplies to overseas bases. NAVIGATION — Air Force 
Reservists. Captain Philip R. Goerner (I) and Major Donald 
P. Foley perfect their navigation skills during weekend training 
flights. Both are assigned to Air Force Reserve's 8503rd 
Navigator Training Sq., Minneapolis, Minnesota. Q PUBLIC 
RELATIONS— Air National Guard's 1 13th Tactical Fighter 
Wg., Washington, D.C., conducted its most recent 15-day tour 
active duty training at Volk Field, Wisconsin. A2C James 
Soil, Information Specialist, used his training as a broadcaster 
to provide local radio station with news and information about 
the unit and its personnel. 



II 

* * ■'■■ 


• 

• 








USA* Recurring Publics '.')■ 

I-H-2-44-4 







iZ-:Uo$ 



\& tf^ *S j / ( 







An National Guard en- 
tered the Mach 2 field 
(twice the speed of sound) 
last month when it. ac- 
cepted the first of nine 
teen, 1,500 mile per hour 
F 105 L rhunderehiefsV 

The first Air Guard 
unit to receive the versa- 
tile, tactical jet-fighter was 
the 108th Taetieal Fighter 
Wing, McGuire Air Force 
Base, New Jersey. (The 
story of ANG's acquisition 
of the F-105 continues on 
page 2.) 



Specia 

Supplement: 

"Our Aerospace Force 



I 

s 
s 
u 

[ . . . includes a supplement 
entitled "Our Aerospace 
Force," beginning on page 
1AF (normally page 13). Its 
purpose is to serve as a con- 
venient reference and to ac- 
quaint members of the Air 
Reserve Forces with current 
Air Force concepts, policies, 
missions and structure. 



the air reservist 



Vol. XVI-No. 3 



May 1964 



AIR NATIONAL GUARD 
AIR FORCE RESERVE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 

EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 

The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of Hq USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington 25, DC. 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

is listed in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 

•■en approved by Hq USAF. 




F-105 / continued 

Brig. General Donald J. Strait, wing 
commander stated, "This supersonic 
mach 2 jet fighter-bomber, with the 
capability of delivering weapons 
throughout the complete conventional 
spectrum and with its ability to refuel 
in the air giving it a global capability, 
will be a tremendous asset to the 
readiness of the Air National Guard." 

Delivery of the two million dollar 
aircraft from the Air Materiel Area, 
Mobile, Alabama, marks the first time 
the Air Guard has had a mach 2 air- 
craft in its inventory since two squad- 
rons of F-104s were returned to the 
Air Force in January 1963. 

Chief of the National Guard Bu- 
reau, Maj. General Winston P. Wil- 
son, termed delivery of F-105 as, 
"testimony of Air Force confidence 
in the Air National Guard and an in- 
dication of the essential role the 
Guard plays in the nation's defense 
structure. 

Also converting to a new type air- 
craft is Air National Guard's 151st 
Fighter Interceptor Sq., Knoxville, 
Tenn. The unit will change its mis- 
sion too, as they convert from the 
F-102 to the KC-97 aerial tanker. 
The 151st is scheduled to receive a 
total of ten KC-97s from Strategic Air 
Command, increasing Air Guard's re- 
fueling force to four flying squadrons. 



A, 



jr FORCE reserve stepped-up its 
nationwide recruiting program last 
month in an effort to add highly 
skilled Air Force officers and airmen 
to the Reserve roster. 

Specially trained Recruiting Co- 
ordinators from the 16 Air Force Re- 
serve sectors will visit each of U. S. 
Air Force's 129 separation centers. 
Separation centers process those offi- 
cers and airmen leaving active duty. 



First F-105 in the Air Guard inventor 



They are considered the prime souq 
of recruiting for the well-trained pri 
service personnel who are so vital 
the future of the Air Force Reser 
and the role it plays as a "Rear 
Now" augmentation force of USA\ 
The Regular Air Force separate; 
lack of information about the m 
sions, units, equipment and bene! 
of Reserve participation has be 
labeled the immediate target, 
eliminate this knowledge gap, si 
cially prepared recruiting materii 
are being distributed to the separati: 
centers by the recruiting coordinate* 
backed up by their personal kno>i 
edge of the Air Force Reserve pi 
gram and its requirements. Includ 
in the package of recruiting materii 
are two 16-mm, color, sound fill 
(one to be shown to officers, the otl 
to airmen) describing the global m 
sions and many benefits of memb 
ship in the Air Force Reserve. 



A 



irmen assigned to Reserve uri 
who make substantial contributic 
to recruiting and retention for thl 
unit may be rewarded with overs* 
flights under a recent Continental 1 
Command plan. 

Quotas for participation have be 
allotted Reserve regions. Criteria : 
selection includes the amount 
work the Reservist has done in, 
non-pay status to further unit (, 
jectives. A further consideration a 
be his ability to create a favora; 
impression of the USAF overseas. 

The trips will be provided on 
space available basis during Rese: 
training flights to overseas bases. 1 
frequency with which Reservists \ 
be selected for future trips will 
pend on available man-days, TI 
funds, and aircraft missions. 

NEWS / on pagi 



AIR GUARD 

REACTS RAPIDLY TO 

ALASKA CRISIS 



with personnel. . . aircraft . . . supplies 



by Capt. Dempsey A. Anderson 

Alaska Air National Guard 



"Good Friday," March 27, 1964, 
le of the most devastating earth- 
jakes in history rocked Alaska. The 
gantic upheaval and tidal wave it 
:nerated caused unbelievable dam- 
»e and destruction. 
History? OK, if you overlook the 
assive rebuilding Alaskans face. 
However, there are numerous in- 
dents of courage and self-sacrifice 
it reported — and deserve telling. 
A case in point: the alert and fast 
:ting Alaska Air Guardsmen, mem- 
jrs of the 144th Air Transport 
madron stationed at Kulis ANG 
ase, Anchorage. All they did was 
scue trapped victims, administer 
st aid to the injured, provide food 
id shelter for the homeless, reestab- 
h vital communications and per- 
rm myriad emergency tasks, includ- 
g the airlift of rescue workers and 
sential supplies to other stricken 
immunities. This, in addition to re- 
aring their own damaged facilities. 
Anchorage, Alaska's largest city, 
as the hardest hit. Buildings over 
ost of a 14-block area were de- 
olished, huge crevices opened its 
"eets, water mains, gas pipes, power 
id phone lines broke. That night 
ost of the people were without 
iwer, water and heat in the sub- 
:ezing Alaska weather. 
Without warning, Alaskan Air 
uardsmen became key participants 
an unfolding drama. The 144th's 
iptains Herb Bredow and Joe Kuch- 
along with Sergeant Oscar Holland 
id just landed at Kulis after a 
outine" mercy flight in which they 
r dropped supplies to natives at 
illingham, Alaska. 

The quake struck as the sergeant 
is servicing their C-123J "Provider" 
d the two officers were walking 
ward the parking lot. Bredow and 
ichta were knocked to the ground 
' the violence of the tremor and 
iy watched helplessly as buildings 
llapsed and water storage tanks 
ptured. The quake lasted approx- 
iately four minutes, starting slowly, 



building to a violent pitch and end- 
ing as suddenly as it began. 

Regaining their feet, Bredow and 
Kuchta ran to the unit's personnel 
office where they joined forces with 
Sergeants J. C. Hobson and Holland. 

Kuchta and Hobson turned off 
power switches and water lines to 
avoid the possibility of fire and stop 
the flow of water from ruptured water 
mains, while Bredow and Holland 
made a running survey of the base 
and aircraft to determine damage. 

About this time, another Air 
Guardsman, Major Jim Rowe came 
over from nearby Anchorage Inter- 
national Airport, which shares its 
runways with Kulis ANG base. He 
reported that the terminal had been 
badly damaged and that the control 
tower had collapsed, trapping people 
inside. Responding to this informa- 
tion, Sergeants Chuck Christy and 
Holland drove to the scene in a 
wrecker which they used to remove 
large chunks of concrete. Three men 
were found amid the wreckage. Then 
the sergeants used an ambulance to 
drive the victims to the hospital. One 
died enroute, the other two survived. 

At this point, Major Rowe started 



one of the C-123s, realizing the des- 
perate need for an emergency con- 
trol tower and a means of communica- 
tions. The aircraft's radio was used 
to alert the world to the disaster. 

By this time Major General 
Thomas P. Carroll, adjutant general 
of Alaska, had directed Major John 
Podraza to assume command of the 
base and to activate the Air National 
Guard unit in State status. The re- 
sponse was exceptional. Within 20 
minutes after the quake, without be- 
ing called, Air Guardsmen began ar- 
riving at the base. Those not needed 
were assigned to help Civil Defense 
and other government agencies. 

Guardsmen remaining at Kulis 
formulated emergency plans which in- 
cluded making available aircraft ready 
for emergency use. Within four hours 
six of the ten aircraft were manned 
and standing by. 

Other Guardsmen performed other 
vital jobs. Personnel of the motor 
vehicle section supplied electricity 
from emergency power units; mainte- 
nance squadron personnel took emer- 
gency steps to bring heat to strategic 

ALASKA / next page 



Anchorage street reflects severity of Alaska's worst earthquake. 




Value of training to meet state and federal emergencies proven . . . 



ALASKA / continued 

buildings, and the dispensary was 
made ready and manned by medical 
technicians. A warehouse was con- 
verted to an emergency shelter with 
100 beds and a makeshift dining hall. 

As the jobs neared completion, 
local radio stations and government 
agencies were advised that Kulis ANG 
base was ready to provide shelter, 
food and medical attention to those 
requiring it. By midnight, 97 women 
and children occupied the warehouse. 

Away from the base, a team of Air 
Guardsmen patrolled the city, re- 
porting damage and inspecting build- 
ings for victims. Medical technicians 
in an ANG ambulance treated many 
injured civilians and transported pa- 
tients and medical supplies. 

Early next morning two ANG 
C-123s were used to transport Army 
Guardsmen to Seward and Kodiak. 
The lethal force of the upheaval had 
ruptured oil tanks, setting Seward 
ablaze, and a 17-foot tidal wave had 
demolished downtown Kodiak. The 
Guard planes were the first to land 
at the stricken communities. 

After discharging the Army 
Guardsmen the two aircraft returned 
to Anchorage where they took on a 
cargo of diesel fuel for delivery to 
Valdez. That city also had been hard 
hit and although only 3,000 feet of 
the airport runway was usable, the 
planes landed safely. 

Before a week ended the Air 
Guardsmen had flown some 25 mis- 
sions involving 77 sorties and air- 
lifted 201 passengers and 131,054 
pounds of cargo. 

Most citizens of Anchorage faced 
a bleak Easter, but in the midst of 
chaos the Air Guardsmen found time 
to remember the homeless children 
sheltered at the base. Explaining the 
situation to local merchants, the 
Guardsmen collected donations of 
baskets, eggs and assorted candies 
and spent Saturday evening working 
their own brand of magic. Next 
morning — Easter Sunday — the chil- 
dren were able to forget the disaster 
they had survived and the ruins that 
surrounded them. For a little while 
it was much more important to find 
an Easter egg, hidden — not too care- 
fully — by an Air National Guards- 
man. ANG performs many missions. 

The 144th Air Transport Squad- 
ron was not the only Air Guard unit 
to provide help to stricken Alaska. 



Air Guard units from four states flew 
a total of 12 missions to that state 
carrying everything from food col- 
lected by the Salvation Army to a 
whole building for Civil Defense. 

On Saturday, March 29, an air- 
craft of the 146th Air Transport 
Group, Van Nuys, California ANG, 
departed for Alaska carrying 18,000 
pounds of medical and emergency 
supplies. The next day, three more 
Air Guard heavy transports were dis- 
patched to Alaska. They were from 
the 146th; the 151st Air Transport 
Group, Salt Lake City, Utah; and 
the 161st Air Transport Group of 
Phoenix, Arizona. The 187th Air 
Transport Group of Cheyenne, Wyo- 
ming also flew a mission to Alaska. 

During the first two weeks in April 
the Van Nuys unit sent three more 
C-97s to Alaska carrying about 30,- 
000 pounds of cargo ranging from 



canned spaghetti to wool socks tha 
had been collected by local radii 
stations in conjunction with the Sal 
vation Army. During the same pe| 
riod the 151 st and 1 6 1 st made mercj 
flights to Alaska and the 146th usel 
two more aircraft to transport a prd 
fabricated building donated by a Call 
fornia concern for use as Civil Da 
fense headquarters in Anchorage. 

A sad addition to this story of saa 
rifice and dedication to duty involve; 
Maj. Gen. Thomas Carroll and Maj 
Jim Rowe. Both, along with Lt. Co' 
Thomas Norris and TSgt Kennetl 
Ayers, were killed April 27th as thei 
aircraft plunged into the sea nea 
Valdez. Alaska's Governor, Willian 
Egan, and his staff left the plane mo 
ments before it crashed. They wert 
on a 'quake-damage inspection toun 




Women and children — 'quake victims — found food, heat and 
shelter in ANG base warehouse converted by Air Guardsmen. 



ANG C-123s served as emergency communications centers 
and to airlift personnel and supplies to 'quake-racked areas. 



40847 \ 




AilA 



PEOPLE IN 
THE 

NEWS 



Regulars . . . Reserves . . . Civilians . . . 




Oldham 






Doherty 






Teamwork and 

dedication are the key 

a "professional" Air Force 



VJTeneral Curtis E. LeMay, Air Force Chief of Staff since 1961, 
will at the request of President Johnson, continue in his present 
post until February 1, 1965. General LeMay's Pentagon tour 
was to have ended June 30. He was originally appointed for a 
two-year term by the late President John F. Kennedy and re- 
ceived a one-year extension last year . . . Mr. John A. Lang Jr., 
deputy for Reserve and ROTC affairs since 1961, was named 
administrative assistant to Secretary of the Air Force Eugene M. 
Zuckert in February. A brigadier general in the Air Force Re- 
serve, Mr. Lang recently was awarded the Reserve Officers As- 
sociation's Distinguished Service Citation for his many contribu- 
tions to the Reserve program. 

Major William H. Nunn, communications-electronics staff offi- 
cer, 8438th Air Force Reserve Recovery Group, Dobbins AFB, 
Georgia, designed and built a unique sideband transmitter from 
castoff radio and television parts, which is now being used by 
his unit to tie in with the tactical training radio net. It's the 
second transmitter the major has built for his unit. The first, how- 
ever, was assembled the easy way — with new equipment. 

TSgt. Norman G. Oldham, 82nd Air Terminal Squadron, Travis 
AFB, California, is a man of his word. When he entered the 
Air Force Reserve in February 1958, he vowed that by the 
time he had completed his six-year military obligation he would 
be a technical sergeant. Last month he received his technical 
sergeant's stripes. He celebrated by reenlisting. During his first 
six years, the sergeant found time to graduate from Idaho State 
College with a degree in accounting. He is an Internal Revenue 
agent in civilian life and attends night school, studying for his 
law degree. 

SSgt. James B. Doherty, information specialist with the 9624th Air 
Force Reserve Recovery Squadron, Long Beach, California, re- 
cently was presented the Air Force Commendation Medal for ". . . 
duty high above what is normally expected," while on active duty 
as sergeant in Korea during 1951-52. Doherty is better known as 
a Hollywood motion picture and TV producer. A company has 
purchased a script, based on his experiences in Korea, which they 
plan to make into a movie. 

MSgt. Albert Neumann and TSgt. Robert Kelley, 179th Materiel 
Squadron, Mansfield, Ohio Air National Guard, are credited with 
a $25,000 savings idea for the government and taxpayers. Last 
year, while visiting an Army Ordnance Depot, they saw a $1,600 
surplus guided missile fuel servicer. They obtained one, added a 
$20.00 sling and hook, converting it to a portable hoist for instal- 
ling and removing jet tail pipes, canopies and seats. Two men 
using the hoist can now do a job which formerly required four or 
five men. Converted hoists are now being used by a number of 
ANG units. 

MSgt. Dimitri Stilu, 8301st Air Force Reserve Recovery Group, 
Worcester, Massachusetts, sharpshooter, is the first Reservist to be 
awarded the Air Force's Distinguished Pistol Shot Badge. He 
earned the award by placing in the top 10 percent in last summer's 
regional matches and the national at Camp Perry, Ohio. He fired 
a standard .45 automatic. 

TSgt. Edward W. Wade, 8569th Air Force Reserve Recovery 
Group, Des Moines, Iowa, an inventive aircraft technician, has 
developed an aircraft starter and ground power equipment training 
aid which is mounted on a flat bed truck for mobility. His idea 
has been forwarded to Continental Air Command headquarters for 
possible command adoption. 



AIRRESERVl 

RECORDS CENTER 

MANPOWER BANK OF THE AIR FORCE 



T 



he Air Reserve Records Center 
(ARRC) which plays a vital part in 
the "Ready Now" concept of the Air 
Force Reserve, observed its 10th an- 
niversary this year. 

Twice in recent years the Records 
Center proved ready to respond to a 
national emergency. First the Berlin 
situation: this required the recall of 
specially qualified individual Reserv- 
ists within a very short time. ARRC 
met the challenge by putting into 
effect pre-planned procedures to mo- 
bilize the exact number and type Re- 
servists needed to meet the emer- 
gency. The next crisis involved Cuba 
and although the Reservists were re- 
called by units the Records Center 
again was ready to react immediately. 

Located in Denver, Colorado, the 
Center operates as a headquarters un- 
der the Continental Air Command. 
Colonel Carroll S. Geddes, USAF, is 
its commander. 

Since ARRC first opened its doors 
for business on March 1, 1954, it has 
grown in size and importance. It has 
evolved from a centralized storage 
and maintenance facility to a com- 
plex, highly-automated personnel cen- 
ter responsible for administering the 
service careers of all Air Force Re- 
servists not on extended active duty. 

During normal times the Center's 
staff works constantly to keep records 
of Air Force Reservists up-to-date. 
The Air Force must know that the 
Reservist they call to active duty is 
the right man — trained, qualified, and 
available when needed. He must be 
"Ready Now," and Air Reserve Rec- 
ords Center must know that he is. 

During an average day, ARRC 
personnel file over 8,000 individual 
documents, receive and dispatch al- 
most 23,000 communications, handle 
about 9,000 incoming orders, and 
publish and mail about 3,000 sets of 
official orders. It is estimated that 
Center personnel handle six million 
pieces of correspondence a year. 



Address changes account for about 
100,000 record changes a year. 

Some Air Force Reservists are not 
aware of the importance of maintain- 
ing their correct address with the 
ARRC. This is a responsibility of 
each individual Reservist. Not only 
does a correct address insure prompt 
and timely receipt by the Reservist 
of important documents, it also is a 
prime requisite in the event of emer- 
gencies or actual mobilization. Being 
unable to locate a Reservist also could 
conceiveably result in non-credit of 
points for retirement or even dis- 
charge from the Air Force Reserve. 
The Center finds that the most fre- 
quent offenders are Reservists who 
move and fail to notify them of their 
address change. All that is required 
is a note or postal card containing 
the Reservist's name, service number 
and new address. 



Imagine processing 8,000 to 10, 
000 address changes each month an 
researching the whereabouts of 8,00 
"lost" Reservists. Researching thi 
volume of bad addresses takes tirm 
money and manpower. Expensiv 
time is also consumed in compute 
operations in identifying bad ad 
dresses and effecting changes to mag 
netic tape. This can be precluded i 
Reservists promptly notify ARRC 
3800 York Street, Denver, Colorad 
80205, of any change in address. 

Another example of the mammot 
job being accomplished by the Cente 
is the approximate 300,000 mailin 
labels it furnishes "The Air Reservist 
magazine each month. 

How they do all this is a tribut 
to modern technology and to each c 
the Center's more than 1,000 civilia 
and military employees. 




Modern electronic computer system utilized by ARRC . . . console (cen 
ter), tape reader (r), monitor printer (I), and tape stations in background 



. from master record— to magnetic tape— to orders 



ARRC technicians handle all types 
actions affecting a Reservist's ca- 
;r: assignments, promotions, dis- 
arges, separations and retirements, 
addition, the preparation and mail- 
l of paychecks for Reservists is a 
:ently acquired and exacting re- 
ansibility. Each year the Center 
uls 250,000 checks for inactive 
ty pay and for active duty tours. 
To handle its growing workload 
d to assure speed and accuracy for 
)bilization, the Center must depend 
modern electronics. In October 
59 the U. S. Air Force approved 
: installation of a complete elec- 
<nic data processing system. 
The system includes a computer 
:h a three module (49,152 char- 
:ers) core memory, ten magnetic 
>e stations, two electro-mechanical 
nters and a tape switching unit, 
scial electric typewriters which 
:ate and accept punched paper 
>es, automatically type official 
lers or documents at the rate of 

words per minute. 

The Records Center also provides 
uable assistance to the Air National 
ard by processing retirements of 
:h Air Guard officers and airmen 
i conditional releases of Air Force 
servists transferring to the Air Na- 
tial Guard. 

For example, when an Air Guards- 
n applies for retirement, his per- 
inel record is forwarded to the 
cords Center which determines his 
;ibility. If eligible, his state is no- 
;d and effects his discharge. The 
cord Center then takes action to 
ce him on the USAF Reserve re- 
d list. 
Conditional releases of all officers 

1 airmen transferring from the Air 
rce Reserve to the Air National 
ard also are handled by the Ree- 
ls Center. During the Berlin crisis, 

Center extended its fullest co- 
nation to the Air National Guard 
expediting the necessary releases. 



Representatives of the National 
Guard Bureau, Headquarters Conti- 
nental Air Command and the Records 
Center, working as a team the past 
year, have devised a system to provide 
compatibility of personnel data be- 
tween both Reserve components and 
the Regular establishment system. 

Effective July 1, the Records Cen- 
ter will become the servicing agency 
for the Air National Guard in elec- 
tronic data processing of all officer 
personnel information. By early 1966 
it also will provide the same service 
for Air Guard enlisted personnel. This 
step forward will expedite the process- 
ing of data, providing the Air Na- 
tional Guard with current statistics on 
which to base budgeting and other 
Department of Defense requirements. 

Essential information from all the 
master personnel records on file is 
recorded on 17 reels of magnetic 
tape. This enables rosters and 
strength reports required by higher 
headquarters for defense planning to 
be prepared quickly and accurately. 
The computer can "look at" all the 
master records and use pre-planned 
programs to select all qualified in- 
dividuals meeting specific criteria 
within a few hours. This is particu- 
larly important during time of na- 
tional crisis when Reservists must be 
mobilized rapidly. 

Throughout its 10-year history, 
ARRC has stressed economy as well 
as speed and accuracy. Each year it 
has added new responsibilities, until 
today it is doing twice as much work 
with fewer people than previously. 

As it moves into its second decade, 
well aware of its place in the total 
Air Force program, the Air Reserve 
Records Center stands ready to face 
any new crisis. Then again — as in 
the past — it will move swiftly into 
high gear, setting in motion the pro- 
cedures to augment the active duty 
Air Force by calling up citizen-air- 
men throughout the country. 




ted 



LEGEND: For officer grade identification: 0-6 standi for Col.; 0-5 
standi for Lt. Col.; 0-4, Maj.; 0-3, Capt.; 0-2, 1st Lt. Where openings 
exist in the same Air Force Specialty Code (AFSC) for more than 
one grade, the lowest and highest grades are indicated. Example: 
0-2/5 means there ere openings for grades first lieutenant through 
lieutenant colonel. Enlisted: The AFSC identifies the job title. The 
letter "X" in AFSC (646XO) indicates openings in more than one 
grade. E-2 indicates Airman Third Class; E-3, A2C; E-4, A1C; E-5, 
SSgt; E-6, TSgt; E-7, MSgt; E-8, SMSgt; and E-9, CMSgt. Example: 
622X0, E-3/7 indicates openings for airmen second class to master 
sergeant in the Food Services Career Field. 

The following vacancies and AFSC descriptions exist at CONAC Air 
Rescue, Air Postal, Mobile Communications, Troop Carrier, and Air 
Terminal units. Positions offer up to 48 paid drills, a 15-day 
annual tour of active duty, retirement points, and possible promo- 
tion. Applicants should write unit of choice, giving full name, 
address, grade and AFSC. 



ALABAMA 

Bates Fid., Det 5, 13 Mbl. Comm. 
Sq. Enlisted: 272X0, E-2/7 (6); 
363X0, E-2/4 (1). 

Bates Fid., 908 TCGp. Officer: 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (6); 1435Z, 0-3 (5); 
1535, 0-2/3 (3). Enlisted: 431X1A, 
E-3/6 (15); 571X0, E-3/5 (9); 622X0, 
E-3/5 (7). 



ARIZONA 
Davis Monthan AFB, Det 8, 12 

Mbl. Comm. Sq. Officer: 1634, O- 
2/3 (1). Enlisted: 272X0, E-3/7 (8); 
30351, E-5 (1); 30451, E-5 (1); 
363X0, E-3 (1); 42133, E-3 (1). 

Luke AFB, 302 Air Rescue Sq. 
Enlisted: A293X2, E-2/5 (1); 301X0, 
E-2/5 (1); B921X0A, E-2/5 (1). 

Det 4, 12 Mbl. Comm. Sq. Officer: 
1634, 0-2/3 (1). Enlisted: 272X0, E- 
5/7 (4); 30474, E-7 (1). 

Det 7, 12 Mbl. Comm. Sq. Officer: 
1634, 0-2/3 (1). Enlisted: 272X0, E- 
5/7 (7); 30371, E-6 (1); 30474, E-7 
(1). 



CALIFORNIA 

Hamilton AFB, 938 TCGp. En- 
listed: 291X0. E-5/6 (5); 471X1, E- 
3/5, (5); 571X0, E-3/6 (13); 582X0, 
E-3/7 (6); 605X1, E-3/5 (5); 622X0, 
E-3/7 (6). 

March AFB, Det. 6, 12 Mbl. 
Comm. Sq. Enlisted: 272X0, E-3/7 
(6); 293X0, E-3/6 (3); 303X1, E-3/6 
(3); 304X4, E-3/5 (3); 363X0, E-3/5 
(3); 421X3, E-2/5 (2). 

Det 9, 12 Mbl. Comm. Sq. En- 
listed: 272X0, E-3/7 (10); 303X1, E- 
4/6 (2); 304X4, E-3/6 (3); 42153, E- 
4/5 (2). 

Mather AFB, 12 Mbl. Comm. Sq. 
Officer: 1634, 0-2/3 (2); 6424, 0-2/3 
(1). Enlisted: 272X0, E-5/7 (5); 
291X0, E-5/7 (9); 293X0, E-5/7 (4); 
303X1, E-5/7 (1); 304X0, E-5/7 (1); 
304X1, E-5/7 (1); 304X4, E-5/7 (1); 
421X3, E-5/7 (2); 363X0, E-5/7 (1); 
545X0, E-5/7 (1). 

McClellan AFB, 940 TCGp. Offi- 
cer: 1055Z, 0-2/3 (13). Enlisted: 
43131A. E-3 (12); 565X0, E-2/6 (6); 
571X0, E-3/6 (17); 647X0, E-3/6 (8); 
702X0, E-3/5 (9). 

87 ATennSq. Enlisted: 60570, E-7 
(1); 60551, E-5 (5). 

San Francisco, 2 Air Postal Gp. 
Officer: 7016, 0-3/4 (4); 7024, O- 
2/3 (5). Enlisted: 702X0. E-3/7 (22); 
702X1. E-2/5 (63); 732XOB, E-3/6 
(3). 

Travis AFB, Det 2, 12 Mbl. 
< omm. Sq Ofl.cur: 1634, 0-2/3 (1). 
Knlisted: 272X0, E-3/7 (8); 303X1, 
E-3/6 (3); 304X1, E-3/5 (2); 42153, 
E-4 (I) 

82 ATermSq. Enlisted: 605X0, E 
4/7 (11); 60551, E-4/5 (10). 



CONNECTICUT 
Bradley Fid., 905 TCGp. Officer: 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (11). Enlisted: 27430, 
E-5 (3); A29352, E-5 (5); 571X0, E- 
3/6 (22); 622X0, E-3/4 (11); A607X0, 
E-4/7 (7). 

FLORIDA 
Homestead AFB, 301 Air Rescue 

Sq. Enlisted: B921X0A, E-2/5 (3). 

Homestead AFB, 435 TCWg. Offi- 
cer: 1055Z, 0-2/3 (8). Enlisted 
431X1A, E-3/6 (20); 36150, E-4 (2) 
565X0, E-3/6 (6); 571X0, E-3/6 (12) 
643X0A, E-3/6 (7). 

90 ATermSq. Enlisted: 60550, E- 
4/5 (4); 60551, E-4 (2). 

GEORGIA 

Dobbins AFB, 1st Air Postal Gp. 
Officer: 7024, 6-2/3 (3). Enlisted: 
702X0, E-3/4 (6); 70251, E-4 (1); 
732X0B, E-4/7 (3). 

Hunter AFB, Det 3, 13 Mbl. 
Comm. Sq. Officer: 3034, 0-2/3 (1). 
Enlisted: 272X0, E-4/7 (5). 

Robins AFB, Det 7, 13 Mbl. 
Comm. Sq. Enlisted: 292X0, E-3/7 
(10); 293X0, E-3 (1); 303X1, E-4/6 
(4); 304X1, E-3 (1); 363X0, E-5 (1); 
421X3, E^l/5 (2). 

ILLINOIS 

Scott AFB, 11 Mbl. Comm. Sq. 
Enlisted: 272X0, E-5/7 (7); 291X0, 
E-4/6 (9); 293X0, E-3/6 (6); 303X1, 
E-4/6 (2); 30471. E-6 (1); 36350, E-5 
(1); 47151, E-4 (1). 

Scott AFB, 932 TCGp. Officer: 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (16); 1435A/Z, 0-2/3 
(5); 1535, 0-2/3 (8); 9025, 0-3 (1); 
9356, 04 (2); 9826, 0-3 (1). En- 
listed. 431X1A, E-3/6 (24); 47151, 
E-4/5 (9); 571X0, E-3/5 (20); 
A607XO, E-4/6 (11); 645X0, E-4/6 
(15); 64750, E-4/5 (9). 

INDIANA 
Bakalar AFB, 434 TCWg. Officer: 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (50); 1535, 0-2/3 (18); 
9356, 0-4 (2). Enlisted: 291X0, E- 
4/6 (17); 571X0, E-3/8 (21); 702X0, 
E-3/6 (17). 

LOUISIANA 

Barksdale AFB, 917 TCGP. Offi- 
cer: 1055C, 0-2/3 (4); 1435, 0-3 (3); 
9356, 0-4 (2). Enlisted. A43570, E- 
6/7 (7); A60750, E-4 (2); 643X0A, E- 
4/6 (5). 

New Orleans, 926 TCGp. Officer: 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (5); 1435A, 0-3 (4). 
Enlisted: 461X0, E-5/6 (3); 582X0, 
E-4/7 (3); 603X0, E-3/5 (4); 605X0, 
E-3/5 (8). 

MARYLAND 
Andrews AFB, 459 TCWg. Officer: 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (10). Enlisted. 241X0A, 
E-5/6 (2); 27430, E-5 (3); 431X1A, 
E-3/6 (8); 461X1, E-5/6 (2); 704X0, 
E-5/7 (3). 



MASSACHUSETTS 
L. G. Hanscom Fid., 94 TCWg 

Officer: 1055Z, 0-2/3 (12). Enlisted 
421X2, E^t/6 (2); 42450, E-4/5 (2) 
431X1, F-,-3/8 (6); 571X0, E-3/6 (7) 
582X0, E-5/6 (2). 

85 ATermSq. Enlisted: 60550, E- 
4/5 (6); 60551, E-4/5 (6). 

MICHIGAN 

Selfridge AFB, 403 TCWg. Officer: 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (27); 1535, 0-2/3 (15). 
Enlisted: 43IX1A, E-3/6 (12); 571X0, 
E-3/6 (11); A607X0, E-4/8 (9); 
622X0, E-2/4 (8). 

Self ridge AFB, 305 Air Rescue 
Sq. Officer: 1035A, 0-2/4 (1); 1535, 
0-2/3 (1). Enlisted: 301X0, E-3/4 
(2); 431X1A, E-2/7 (5); B921X0A, 
E-4/7 (4). 

Det 1, 11 Mbl. Comm. Sq. Officer: 
3034, 0-2/3 (1). Enlisted: 272X0, 
E-3/6 (5); 304X0, E-5 (1). 

MINNESOTA 
Mpls.-St. Paul IAP, 934 TCGp. 

Enlisted: 241 X0A, E-5/6 (2); 27430, 
E-5 (3); 431X1A, E-3/6 (10); 565X0, 
E-3/6 (9); 571X0, E-3/6 (11); 70450, 
E-5 (2). 

MISSOURI 

Rlchards-Gebaur AFB, 442 TCWg. 
Officer: 1435Z, 0-3 (3); 1535, 0-2/4 
(4). Enlisted: A43570, E-6/7 (18); 
471X1, E-3/5 (18); 571X0, E-3/6 
(41); 643X0A, E-3/6 (7). 

Richards-Gebaur AFB, Det 2, 11 
Mbl. Comm. Sq. Officer: 1634, 0-2/3 
(1). Enlisted: 272X0, E-3/7 (9); 
303X 1 , E-4/6 (3). 

NEBRASKA 
Offutt AFB, Det 3. 11 Mbl. 
Comm. Sq. Enlisted: 272X0, E-3/7 
(6); 303X1, E-3/6 (2); 304X1, E-3 
(1); 421X3, E-2/3 (3). 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
Grenier Fid., 902 TCGp. Officer: 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (31); 1535, 0-2/3 (3). 
Enlisted: 431X1A, E-3/6 (36); 571X0, 
E-3/8 (14); 645X0, E-3/5 (6); 702X0, 
E-3/ 4 (15). 

NEW JERSEY 
McGuire AFB, 514 TCWg. Officer: 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (9); 1435Z, 0-2/3 (3). 
Enlisted: 60550, E-4; 60551, E-4/5; 
A6075O, E-4. 

NEW YORK 
Niagara Falls MAP, 914 TCGp. 

Officer: 1055Z, 0-2/3 (13). Enlisted: 
291X0, E-3/5 (5); 431X1A, E-3/6 
(19); 471X1, E-3/5 (5); 565X0, E-3/6 
(7); 571X0, E-3/6 (14). 

Stewart AFB, 904 TCGp. Officer: 
0036, 0-5 (1); 1055Z, 0-2/3 (10); 
6724, 0-2/3 (1); 6736, 0-4 (1). En- 
listed: 431X1A, E-3/7 (11); 571X0, 
E-3/6 (9). 

Suffolk Co. AFB, Det 4, 11 Mbl. 
Comm. Sq. Enlisted: 272X0, E-5/7 
(8); 293X0, E-4/6 (3); 303X1, E-4/6 
(3); 304X1, E-3/5 (2); 36350, E-4/5 
(2); 42173, E-6 (1); 64650, E-5(l). 



OHIO 

Clinton County AFB, 302 TCWg. 
Officer: 1055Z, 0-2/3 (44). Enlisted: 
B272X0, E-3/7 (18); 27430, E-5 (6); 
29150, E-4/5 (8); 431X1A, E-3/6 
(27); 571X0, E-3/6 (17). 

Wright-Patterson AFB, Det 6, 11 
Mbl. Comm. Sq. Enlisted: 272X0, 
E-2/7 (4); 303X1, E-2/6 (2); 304X4, 
E-2/5 (3). 

Youngstown MAP, 910 TCGp. 
Officer: 1055Z, 0-2/3 (8); 1535, O- 
2/3 (3); 9356, 0-4 (2). Enlisted: 
A29352, E-5 (11); 431X1A, E-5/6 
(15); A607X 0, E-4/5 (9). 

OKLAHOMA 

Davis Fid., 929 TCGp. Officer: 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (14); 1535, 0-2/3 (12). 
Enlisted: 29150, E-4/5 (5); 431X1A, 
E-5/7 (25); 571X0, E-3/4 (11). 

Tinker AFB, 937 TCGp. Officer: 
1055C, 0-2/3 (7); 1435A&Z, 0-2/3 
(5). Enlisted: 291X0, E-3/6 (8); 
43151A, E-3/4 (5); A43570, E-6/7 
(7); 571X0, E-3/7 (10); 622X0, E-3/4 
(5); 646X0, E-3/4 (4). 

Tinker AFB, 13 Mbl. Comm. Sq. 
Officer: 1634B, 0-2/3 (1). Enlisted: 



272X0, E-2/7 (13), 291X0, E-2/7 (It 
293X0, E-2/3 12); 301X1, E-2/7 (■ 
303X1, E-2/6 (2); 304X1. E-2/6 M 
304X4, E-2/7 (2); 363X0, E-2/6 (M 
421X3, E-2/6 (5); 471X1, E-2 ! <2>. 



OREGON 

Portland IAP, 304 Air Rescue So, 
Officer: 1035A, 0-2/3 
42330, E-2/3 (1); 43131A, E I 
434X0, E-2/7 (1); 53430, E-2/3 M 
922X0A. E-2/5 (1). 

Portland IAP, 939 TCGp. Officer; 
1055Z, G-2/3 (20); 1435, O . 1 
Enlisted: 271X0, E-3/5 (7); 431X1A 
E-3/6 (24); 571X0, E-3/6 (1, ■ 

E-3/6 (7). 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Greater Pittsburgh AP, 911 ICGp, 

Officer: 1055Z, 0-2/3 (15). Enlisted: 
431X1A, E-3/6 (14); 471X1, E-3/J 
(7); 565XO, E-3/6 (7); 571XO.E-3/I 
(6); 645X0. E-4/6 (7). 

NAS Willow Grove, 512 ICWg 
Officer: 1055Z, 0-2/3 (39). Enlisted; 
274X0, E-4/6 (3); 431X1A, E-3/1 
(25); 571X0, E-3/9 (20). 

Wyoming, 92 ATermSq. Enlisted: 
60551, E-4/5 (7). 



SOUTH CAROLINA 
Charleston AFB, 81 ATermSq. En 
listed: 605X0, E-4/7 (5); 60551, E 
4/5 (4); 70250, E-4 (1); 73270B, E4 
(1). 



TENNESSEE 

Memphis MAP, 919 TCGp. Offl 
cer: 1055A, 0-2/3 (24); 1535, 0-2/: 
(2). Enlisted: 271X0, E-4/6 (3) 
565X0, E-3/5 (6); 571X0, E-3/5 (14) 
685X0, E-3/5 (4). 

920 TCGp. Officer: 1055A, 0-2/ 
(31); 1435, 0-2/3 (3). Enlisted 
204X0, E-5/6 (2); 431X1A, E-3/ 
(8); 603X0A, E-3/5 (4); 622X0, E 
3/4 (6). 



TEXAS 

Burg strom AFB, Det 1, 13 Mbl 

Comm. Sq. Enlisted: 272X0, E-6 (1) 
303X1, E-4/5 (1); 421X3, E-2/5 (3; 

Carswell AFB, 916 TCGp. Officei 
9356, 0-4 (2). Enlisted: 27430, E-3 
(3); 64370A, E-6 (2); 90370, E-6 (1) 
90470, E-6 (1); 90570, E-6 (1); 90671 
E-6 (1); 90770, E-7 (1). 

923 TCGp. Enlisted: 291X0. E-4/ 
(6); A29352, E-5 (11); 36150. E-4/ 
(2); 363X0, E-4/5 (2); 431X1A, I 
3/6 (18); 571X0, E-3/6 (16). 

James Connally AFB, Det 2, 1 
Mbl. Comm. Sq. Officer: 3034, 0-2/ 
(1). Enlisted: 272X0, E-3/7 (81 
303X1, E-3/6 (4); 363X0, E-3/5 (3; 

Kelly AFB, Det 4, 13 Mbl. Comn 
Sq. Officer: 1634B, 0-2/3 (1). El 
listed: 272X0, E-3/7 (8); 30434, E- 
(1). 



UTAH 

Hill AFB, Det 1, 12 Mbl. Comn 
Sq. Officer: 3034, 0-2/3 (1). El 
listed: 27230A, E-3 (2); 29330, E- 
(1); 303X1, E-4/6 (2); 30431, E- 
(1); 304X4, E-2/6 (4); 36350, E-4/ 
(2); 421X3. E-3/5 (4). 

Hill AFB, 945 TCGp. Officei 
1055Z, 0-2/5 (11). Enlisted: 271X1 
E-3/5 (6); 431X1A, E-3/6 (20! 
432X1, E-3/7 (6); 571X0, E-3/6 (181 
702X0, E-3/5 (15). 



WASHINGTON 

McChord AFB, 86 ATermSq. El 
listed: 60550, E-4, (8); 60551, E- 
(7). 

Paine Fid., 941 TCGp. Office! 
1055Z, 0-2/3 (13). Enlisted: 271X1 
E-3/6; 431X1A, E-3/6; 605X1, I 
3/5; 607X0, E-4/9. 

Spokane, Det 3, 12 Mbl. Comn 
Sq. Officer: 3034, 0-2/3 (1). El 
listed: 272X0, E-3/7 (12); 303X 
E-2/6 (5); 304X4, E-3/7 (2). 



WISCONSIN 
Gen. Mitchell Fid., 440 TCW| 
Officer: 1055Z, 0-2/3 (15); 1535, C 
2/3 (3). Enlisted: 291X0, E-4/6 (4 
431X1A, E-3/6 (9); 571X0, E-3/ 
((.), (.85X0, E-3/7 (6). 



■ National Guard units are elig- 
b to use the "Help Wanted" sec- 
n of The AIR RESERVIST maga- 
e. Send unit vacancy lists to: 
tional Guard Bureau, Office of 
alic Affairs, Pentagon, Wash. 25, 
C. Below are reported vacancies 
hin the Air Guard. 



ARKANSAS 
Jrtle Rock, 154 Weather Fit., En- 
ed: 25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 
; 30270, E-7 (1). 



CALIFORNIA 

rntario, 196 Weather Fit.. Officer: 

4, 0-4 (1). Enlisted: 25370, E-7 

252X1, E-5/6 (1); 30270, E-7 

'an Nuys, 195 Weather Fit., En- 
•d: 25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 
70250, E-5 (1). 



HAWAII 
lickam AFB, 199 Weather Fit., 
isted: 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 30270, 
(1). 



ILLINOIS 
f'Hare IAP, 126th Air Refueling 

(TAC). Officer: 1535, 0-1/3 (5). 
pringfield. 183 TFGp., Officer: 
5A, 0-2/4 (8); 1416, 0-4 (2); 
5, 0-3 (4); 6316, 0-4 (1); 3034, 

(1). 



INDIANA 

ort Wayne, 163 Weather Fit., 

cer: 2524, 0-4 (1). Enlisted: 

70, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1). 

lulman Fid., 181 Tac. Figher 

iup. Officer: 1115A, 0-3 (1), 0-2 

C 1334, 0-3 (1); 1435A 0-3 (1), 

5Z, 0-3 (2); 1925, 0-4 (1); 1935, 

(1); 1955, 0-3 (1); 2524, 0-4 

0-2 (1); 3275A, 0-3 (1); 4316, 

(1); 5544, 0-3 (2); 6044, 0-3 

6424, 03 (1); 6476A, 0-2 (1); 

5, 0-3 (1); 7324, 0-2 (1); 8054, 

(1); 8924, 0-3 (1); 9025, 0-3 

9356, 0-4 (1); 9754, 0-3 (2); 

5, 0-3 (1). Enlisted: 20650, E-5 

22351, E-4/5 (1); 24170A, E-6 

24270, E-6 (1); 25150A, E-5 (1); 

51, E-5 (2); 25231, E-3 (1); 25370, 

II (1); 27430, E-5 (3); 29131, E-4 

29150, E-5 (2); 29151, E-5 (1); 

SO. E-4 (1); 30270, E-7 (1); 

JOB, E-3 (2); 322X0B, E-6 (2), E-4 

34270G, E-6 (1); 40250, E-4 

42153, E-4 (2); 42133, E-3 (1); 

i2, E-4/5 (1); 431X1C, E-6 (6); 

(2), E-4 (3); 46150, E-5 (1), 

(1); 46270, E-6 (3); 46250, E-5 

E-4 (6); 46230, E-3 (6); 47150, 

(1); 53150, E-5 (1), E-4 (2); 

iO, E-5 (1); 53350, E-4 (1); 53430, 

(1); 54250Z, E-5 (1); 54250, E-5 

544X0, E-4/6 (1); 55150, E-4 

55251, E-4 (1); 55231, E-3 (1); 

ro, E-7 (1); 55250, E-4 (2); 56350, 

(1); 56330, E-3 (1); 565X0, E-5 

E-6 (1); 56530, E-3 (1); 57150, 

(2); 57130, E-3 (8); 58250, E-5 

60270, E-6 (1), E-4 (1); 60331, 

(2); 62150, E-4 (1); 622X0, E-3/4 

62470, E-6 (1); 64750, E-4 (3); 

I0A, E-3 (4); 645X0, E-6 (1), E-4 

64530, E-3 (1); 64630, E-3 (2); 

i0, E-5 (1), E-4 (1); 64670, E-6 

64750, E-5 (2); 64730, E-3 (2); 

i2, E-5 (1); 68550, E-4 (1); 70270, 

(1); 70250, E-4 (8); 70230, E-3 

70450, E-5 (1); 75170, E-6 (2); 

'0, E-5 (1); 75330, E-5 (1); 77130/ 

'0, E-3 (2), E-4 (1), E-7 (1); 

iOB. E-5 (1); 98150, E-4 (1). 

trre Haute, 113 Weather Fit., 

:er: 2524, 0-4 (2). Enlisted: 

0, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 

'0. E-7 (1); 70250, E-5 (1). 



KANSAS 

cConnell AFB, 127 Weather Fit., 
:er: 2524, 0-4 (1). Enlisted: 
0, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 
'0, E-7 (1). 



KENTUCKY 

ouisville, 165 Weather Fit., En- 
d: 25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 
30270, E-7 (1). 



LOUISIANA 
New Orleans, 122 Weather Fit., En- 
listed: 25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 
(1); 30270, E-7 (1); 70250, E-5 (1). 



MAINE 

Dow AFB 101 Air Defense Wg.. 
(AD). Enlisted: 204X0, E-6 (1); 
322X1, E-7 (1); 432X0. E-7 (1); 
431X1C, E-7 (1); 671X0, E-3 (2), 
E-4 (1), E-5 (2). E-6 (1); 683X0. E-5 
(1); 646X0. E-6 (1): 701X0, E-4/5 
(1); 702X0, E-3 (3): E-4 (7), E-5 (2); 
704X0, E-5 (2): 705X0, E-5 (1); 
711X0. E-3 (2), E-5 (1); 732X0, E-5 
(1). 

101 Fighter Group (AD). Enlisted: 
242X0. E-6 (1): 301X1, E-5 (1); 
431X1C. E-4/5 (1); 434X0. E-7 (1); 
646X0, E-6 (1): 635X0A. E-5 (1); 
651X0. E-4/5 (1); 671X1, E-5 (1); 
732X0, E-5 (1); 732X0. E-6 (1). 

101 Consolidated Aircraft Main- 
tenance Sq. Enlisted: 301X0. E-3 (1): 
322X1E, E-3 (7), E-4 (7), E-5 (4); 
331X0A.E-3 (3); E-4 (1); 402X0, E- 
3/4 (1), E-6 (1); 421X3, E-3/4 (1); 
422X0.E-3 (1); 423X0, E-3/4 (1); 
431X1C, E-3 (16), E-4 (13), E-5 (2); 
432X0.E-3/4 (3); 434X0, E-6 (1); 
461X0. E-3 (3); 462X0, E-3 (4), E- 
4/5 (1), E-6 (3); 552X1, E-3 (1); 
646X0, E-3 (5); 702X0, E-4 (2). 

101 Materiel Sq. Enlisted: 461X0, 
E-2 (2), E-6 (1); 471X1, E-3 (1); 
543X0, E-3 (1); 546X0, E-3 (2); 
551X1, E-4 (2). E-5 (1): 552X0. E-4 
(1): 564X0, E-4 (1); 565X0. E-3 (1): 
571X0. E-3 (12), E-4 (6), E-5 (1). E-6 
(1): 602X1, E-3/5 (1); 602X0. E-5 (1); 
603X0. E-3 (1), E-4 (2); 642X0, E-3 
(1); 643X0A, E-3 (7). E-4/5 (1); 
645X0, E-3 (3), E-4 (1); 671X1, E- 
3/4 (1), E-5 (2); 702X0, E-3 (1), 
E-5 (1). 

101 Air Base Sq. Enlisted: 271X0, 
E-3 (3), E-4/6 (1); 291X0, E-3 (9), 
E-4 (2), E-5/6 (1); 363X0, E-4 (1); 
622X0, E-4 (6); 702X0, E-3 (2); 
771X0, E-3 (3), E-4 (5). 

101 USAF Dispensary. Enlisted: 
98150, E-4 (1). 

132 Fighter Interceptor Sq. En- 
listed: 271X0, E-4 (1); 702X0, E-4 
(1). 



MARYLAND 

Andrews AFB, 121 Weather Fit., 
Officer: 2524, 0-3 (1). Enlisted: 
25370, E-7, (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 
30270. E-7 (1). 

Baltimore, 104 Weather Fit., En- 
listed: 25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 
(1); 30270, E-7 (1). 



MASSACHUSETTS 
Boston, 101 Weather Fit.. Enlisted: 
25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 
30270, E-7 (1). 

Westfield, 131 Weather Fit., Offi- 
cer: 2524, 0-4 (2). Enlisted: 25370, 
E-7 (1); 25271, E-6 (1); 30270, E-7 
(1). 



MICHIGAN 
Detroit, 107 Weather Fit.. Enlisted: 
25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 
30270, E-7 (1). 



MISSOURI 
St. Louis, 110 Weather Fit., En- 
listed: 25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 
(1); 30270, E-7 (1). 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 
Grenier Fid., 133 AeroMed Evac. 

Fit. Officer: 9754, 0-3 (8). Enlisted: 

A90250B, E-5 (6), E-4 (8). 

157 USAF Dispensary. Officer: 

9754, 0-3 (4); 9025, 0-4 (1); 9419, 

0-4 (1). Enlisted: 902X0, E-3/7. 



NEW JERSEY 

Newark, 150 Air Transport Sq. 
Officer: 1535, 0-2/3 (5). Enlisted: 
A43570, E-6/7 (10); A607X0, E-5/6 
(6). 

Newark, 119 Weather Fit., En- 
listed:25370, E-7 (1); 25251, E-5 (1); 
30270, E-7 (1); 70250, E-5 (1). 



NEW YORK 

The following Air National Guard 
vanacies exist at the 552nd Air 
Force Band, Roslyn ANG Station, 
New York. Positions offer 48 paid 
Unit Training Assemblies, 15-day 
field training annually, retirement 
points and promotions. Grade 
openings' available are for AFSC 
761X0, A-M, E-3/6. 

USNAS, Brooklyn, 106 Air Trans. 
Wg. Enlisted: 702X0, E-3/6; 73250, 
E-4; 24170A, E-7; 68370, E-7; 291X0, 
E-3/7; 70570, E-7; 27470, E-7; 
24170A, E-6; A43570, E-6/7; 90670, 
E-6; 75170, E-6; 74170, E-6; 73271, 
E-6; 68170, E-7; 54670W, E-6; 60270, 
E-6; 01090, E-7; 90651, E-5. 

Schenectady County AP, 109 Air 
Trans. Gp. Officer: 1045B, 0-3. En- 
listed: A43570. E-6/7; 30151B, E-5; 
30150, E-5; 42152, E-5; 32570Z, E- 
6; 42450, E-5; 54670W, E-6; 24270, 
E-6; 75330, E-5; 36271, E-6. 

Westchester County AP, 105 Air 
Trans. Gp. Enlisted: A43570, E-6; 
30150, E-4; 43151A. E-5; 43251, E-5; 
77150, E-4; 60750, E-5; 57150, E-4. 



NORTH CAROLINA 
-Charlotte, 156 Weather Fit., En- 
listed: 25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 
(1); 30270, E-7 (1). 



OHIO 

Cincinnati, 123 AC&W Sq. En- 
listed: 27330A, E-3 (3); 273X0A, E-4 
(6), E-5 (5), E-6/7 (1); 29130, E-3 
(6); 291X0, E-6 (10). E-5 (2), E-4 
(6); 30750, E-4 (2), E-5 (1); 30430, 
E-3 (5); 30434, E-3 (2); 30450. E-4 
(3); 30454, E-4 (1), E-5 (2); 30474, 
E-6 (1); 36130. E-3 (1); 36330, E-3 
(2); 47131, E-3 (1); 47153, E-4 (1); 
47170, E-6. (1); 55250. E-4 (1); 
542X0Z, E-3/4 (1); 543X0, E-3 (1), 
E-4 (6); 60330A, E-3 (3); 622X0, E-3 
(3), E-4 (2); 62350, E-4 (1); 73250B, 
E-4 (1); 90270, E-7 (1); 90230, E-3 
(1). 

Clinton County AFB, 160th Air 
Refueling Gp. (TAC). Officer: 1065B, 
0-2/3 (12); 1535, 0-2/3 (6). 

Mansfield, 164 Weather Fit., Offi- 
cer: 2524, 0-4 (1). Enlisted: 25370, 
E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 30270, E- 
7 (1). 



OKLAHOMA 
Tulsa, 125 Weather Fit., Enlisted: 
25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 
30270, E-7 (1). 



OREGON 
Portland, 123 Weather Fit., En- 
listed: 25271, E-6 (1); 30270, E-7 (1). 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Coraopolis, 146 Weather Fit., Offi- 
cer: 2524, 0-4 (1). Enlisted: 25370, 
E-7 (1); 25271, E-6 (1); 30270, E-7 
(1). 

Olmsted AFB, 140 Air Trans. Sq. 
Officer: 1045D, 0-2/3 (7); 1535, O- 
2/3 (4). Enlisted: 56550, E-2/5 (3); 
57150, E-2/4 (10); 64350A, E-2/5 (5); 
77130, E-2/3 (8); A90250B, E-2/5 
(21); 43131A, E-2/3 (17); 43570, E- 
4/6 (5); 42152. E-2/3 (4); 43251, E- 
2/5 (18); 42450, E-2/5 (3); 30454, 
E-2/5 (2). 

USNAS Willow Grove, 140 
Weather Fit.. Officer: 2524, 0-4 (1). 
Enlisted: 25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E- 
5/6 (1); 30270, E-7 (1). 



TENNESSEE 

Memphis, 155 Weather Fit., En- 
listed: 25370, E-7 (1); 25271, E-6 (1); 
30270, E-7 (1). 

Nashville, 105 Weather Fit., En- 
listed: 25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 
(1); 30270, E-7 (1). 



TEXAS 

Dallas, 181 Weather Fit., Officer: 
2524,' 0-4 (1). Enlisted: 25370, E-7 
(1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 30270, E-7 
(1). 

Ellington AFB, 111 Weather Fit., 
Enlisted: 25370, E-7 (1); 252X1, E- 
5/6(1); 30270, E-7 (1). 



Kelly AFB, 182 Weather Fit., Offi- 
cer: 2524, 0-4 (2). Enlisted: 25370, 
E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 30270, E- 
7 (1); 70250, E-5 (1). 



WASHINGTON 

Spokane IAP, 142 Air Defense 
Wg. Officer: 1564, 0-1/2 (5). En- 
listed: 331X0A, E-3 (3); 431X1C, 
E-3 (9); 432X0, E-3 (5); 461X0, E- 
4/6 (6); 462X0, E-5 (3); 671X3, E-5 
(2). 

116 Weather Fit., Officer: 2524, O- 
3 (1). Enlisted: 25370, E-7 (1); 
252X1, E-5/6 (1); 30270, E-7 (1). 



WISCONSIN 
Milwaukee, 126 Weather Fit., Offi- 
cer:2524, 0-3 (1). Enlisted: 25370, 
E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 30270, E- 
7 (1); 70250, E-5 (1). 

WEST VIRGINIA 
Charleston, 167 Weather Fit., Offi- 
cer: 2524, 0-4 (1). Enlisted: 252X1, 
E-5/6 (1); 30270, E-7 (1). 

PUERTO RICO 
San Juan, 198 Weather Fit., Offi- 
cer: 2524, 0-4 (1). Enlisted: 25370, 
E-7 (1); 252X1, E-5/6 (1); 30270, E- 
7 (1). 

The following officer and enlisted 
Part I Mobilization Assignment va- 
cancies exist at Office of Special In- 
vestigation (OSI) locations through- 
out the United States. Individuals 
holding any AFSC may apply for 
vacancies in the 82 career field. 
Applicants for other vacancies must 
be qualified in the AFSC for which 
they apply. Officers in the 8224 
career field are Training Category 
"B", Pay Group "B". All enlisted 
positions are Training Category 
"B", Pay Group "B". Applicants 
must apply in person at nearest 
OSI office. 

Officer: 8224, 0-2. (40); Enlisted: 
704X0, E-9 (1), E-8 (1), E-6 (5), E-5 
(36), E-4 (1); 70430, E-4 (7); 702X0, 
E-7 (6), E-6 (20), E-5 (49), E-4 (3); 
821X0. E-9 (3), E-8 (4), E-7 (94), 
E-6 (51), E-5 (37). 

Printed below are officer and en- 
listed Part I M-Day position vacan- 
cies within the 1607th Air Trans- 
port Wing (MATS), Dover AFB, 
Delaware. 

Officer: 1435Z, 0-3 (3); 1535, 0-3 
(2), 0-2 (6); 1584, 0-3 (6); 4344, O- 
3 (5); 5525, 0-4 (2); 9016 0-4 (1); 
9025, 0-4 (4), 0-3 (5); 0-2 (5); 
9316, 0-6 (1); 0-5 (3); 9326, 0-4 
(8), 0-3 (3); 9336, 0-5 (1); 9356, 0-6 
(1), 0-5 (1); 9386, O-S (1), 0-4 (2); 
9416, 0-6 (1), 0-5 (2); 0-4 (1); 9426, 
0-5 (1); 9436, 0-4 (1); 9446, O-S 
(1); 9486, 0-4 (2); 9576, 0-4 (1); 
9586, 0-3 (1); 9626, 0-4 (1); 9636, 
0-4 (1); 9656, 0-4 (2); 9716, 0-6 (1), 
0-4 (4); 9725, 0-3 (3); 0-2 (4); 9735, 
0-4 (1), 0-3 (4), 0-2 (3); 9745, 0-4 
(1), 0-3 (2); 9754, 0-3 (7); 9816, 0-6 
(2); 9846, O-S (1), 0-4 (1), 0-3 (1); 
9856, 0-6 (1). 

Enlisted: 27170, E-6 (3); 27470, E-7 
(1), E-6 (3); 30170, E-6 (1); 30171B, 
E-6 (1); 34270F, E-6 (2); 42171, E-7 
(1), E-6 (1); 42172, E-6 (1); 42173, 
E-6 (5); 42270, E-6 (1); 42370, E-7 
(1), E-6 (1); 43171A, E-7 (9), E-6 
(15); 43171C. E-7 (1), E-6 (2); 
43171E, E-7 (5), E-6 (19); 43270, E-7 
(2), E-6 (6); 43271, E-6 (8); 43470, 
E-7 (2); A43570, E-7 (48), E-6 (70); 
47170, E-7 (4), E-6 (2); 57170, E-6 
(2); 60570, E-7 (1), E-6 (5); A60770, 
E-7 (6); E-6 (21); 62270, E-6 (2); 
62370, E-6 (1); 64370B, E-6 (3); 
64570, E-7 (1), E-6 (2); 64670, E-6 
(5); 64770, E-6 (1); 64771, E-6 (1); 
70270, E-7 (5), E-6 (23); 73270B, E- 
6 (5); 75170, E-6 (2); 77170, E-7 (5), 
E-6 (8); 90270B, E-7 (7), E-6 (12); 
90290, E-8 (3); 90670, E-7 (5), E-6 
(4); 90770, E-7 (2); 90870, E-6 (2); 
98170, E-7 (2), E-6 (2). 




(Top) ANG's 112th Air Defense Wg. and Ftr. Gp., Pittsburgh, 
celebrate receipt of USAF's Outstanding Unit Award. (Bottom) 
Brig. Gen. Royal Hatch (r) commends Lt. Col. William Longa, 
Comdr., 904th TCGp., on unit's combat effectiveness rating. 




A, 



.ir force reserve's 904th Troop 
Carrier Group, Stewart AFB, New 
York, recently became the first of 
such units throughout the country to 
earn a C-l rating as a result of an 
operational readiness inspection. The 
designation C-l indicates the 904th 
has the highest level of combat capa- 
bility and operational readiness re- 
quired for units of the Regular Air 
Force. 

The U. S. Air Force's Tactical Air 
Command (TAC) is the gaining com- 
mand for 40 of Air Force Reserve's 
45 troop carrier groups. Five groups 
are assigned to Military Air Trans- 
port Service. 

The C-l rating was awarded the 
904th for an operational readiness 
inspection conducted by a team of 
TAC inspectors on April 2-8. Factors 
considered included flying proficiency, 
flying safety, aircrew integrity, mo- 
bilty, planning, aircraft and ground 
maintenance, supply, personnel on 
board, individual technical compe- 
tence, and support capabilities such as 
feeding, security, and engineering. 

The majority of Air Force Re- 
serve's troop carrier groups arc desig- 
nated C-2, a rating which indicates 



they can satisfactorily perform their 
missions but do not meet all the high 
standards set by USAF. 

This month about 200 Air Force 
Reservists and 12 aircraft of the 904th 
will provide active support during the 
joint USAF/Army exercise Silver Fox 
III to be held in Alaska, May 16-30. 



JL ennsylvania Air National Guard's 
112th Air Defense Wing and 112th 
Fighter Group, were presented the 
USAF Outstanding Unit Award in a 
ceremony at Greater Pittsburgh Air- 
port, Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, on 
February 29. 

The Outstanding Unit Award, con- 
ferred by the USAF in recognition of 
achievement whether in peace or war, 
v/as earned by the Pennsylvania Air 
Guardsmen "for exceptionally meri- 
torious service in support of military 
operations from March 1962 to Octo- 
ber 1963." 

The period covered six outstanding 
accomplishments, capped by top hon- 
ors at the USAF Worldwide Intercept 
Weapons Meet, "William Tell," held 
at Tyndall AFB, Florida, last Octo- 
ber. The record included pace-setting 



achievements by the Air Guardsmei 
in operational readiness inspectioni 
tactical evaluations, Hying safety anl 
general inspections. The latter iou 
had earned the units the Air Delens 
Command "A" Award, earlier. 



T> 



wo Air National Guard an 
two Air Force Reserve units of th 
Military Air Transport Service ha^ 
received that command's Outstand 
ing Unit Award Plaque for fligl 
safety. The four have an aggregat 
of 49,573 accident-free flying houn 

Air National Guard units cite< 
were the 146th Air Transport Winj 
Van Nuys, Cailfornia, 25,000 houi 
and the 133rd Air Transport Winj 
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota wit 
13,215 hours. 

Air Force Reserve units were th 
301st Air Rescue Squadron, Home 
stead AFB, Florida, 1,358 hours an 
the 442nd Troop Carrier Wing, Rick 
ards-Gebaur AFB, Missouri, 10,00 
hours. 

The award is given annually t 
those units which make positive coi 
tributions to MATS overall flyin 
safety rate. 

In congratulating the units, Genen 
Joe W. Kelly, MATS commandei 
cited the award as "well-deserve 
recognition" for each individual cor 
tribution to an accident-free recor 
and for superior performance by th 
organizations. 

Two additional Reserve troop cai 
rier wings, the 434th of Bakalar AFI 
Indiana and the 452nd of Marc 
AFB, California, have received tfl 
USAF's Flying Safety Award for thei 
exemplary records from January 1 t 
December 31, 1963. 

The 434th flew 11,888 hours la! 
year, accumulating 80,437 acciden 
free hours. This included among othe 
things, 34 airborne support mission: 
25 overwater training flights and 2 
aerial recovery missions. Earlier, th 
Indiana wing had received the Re 
serve Officers Association's new "Cei 
tificate of Outstanding Accomplist 
ment" for having racked up a seve 
year accident-free record since N(| 
vember 1956. 

The 452nd flew 16,755 hours witr 
out an accident during 1963. Thi 
perfect safety record was achieve 
while aircrews were transitioning 6 
new pilots, upgrading tactical an 
crews and performing airlift and ail 
borne support missions. The unit als 
flew 400 hours in support of lai 
year's Exercise Coulee Crest, man 
in severe weather conditions. 

Both wings are equipped with C 
119 aircraft. 



10 



. ctivation of 41 Air Force Re- 
/e Medical Service units — the first 
ler the new Reserve Medical pro- 
m — is scheduled to be completed 
t month. 

^s announced in the Dec. '63 - 
. '64 The Air Reservist, the pro- 
m will include a total of 148 units 
be activated over an 18-month 
iod. They will be located at 121 
Force bases. 

lie units will train in existing 
\F medical facilities and are de- 
led for maximum functional ca- 
nity. They will be able to "fuse" 
l active Air Force Medical facili- 
, provide immediate replacement 
ability, and participate jointly with 
ve facilities in exercises, or may 
rate independently, 
'he total number of personnel to 
involved in the changeover — 
ltly more than 7,100 — is virtually 
hanged from that now authorized 
all the USAF Reserve hospitals 
casualty staging units which are 
ig replaced. 

ictivated March 8, were the fol- 
ing Medical Service squadrons and 
its: 19th Sq., and 402nd Fit., Otis 
3, Mass.; 401st Fit., Hanscom 
d, Mass.; 20th Sq., McGuire 
3, N. J.; 21st Sq., Westover AFB, 
is.; 22nd Sq. and 403rd Fit., An- 
vs AFB, Md.; 404th and 405th 
., Orlando MAP, Fla.; and the 
th Fit., Perrin AFB, Tex. 
Jso: 408th Fit., Lackland AFB, 
th Fit., James Connally AFB, and 
th Fit., Carswell AFB, Tex.; 23rd 

Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio; 
th Fit., Lowry AFB, Colo.; 412th 

Bunker Hill AFB, Ind.; 413th 

AF Academy, Colo.; 414th Fit., 
ton AFB and the 24th Sq., March 
1, Calif. 

»n April 8, the following units 
i activated: 540th and 418th 
., McGuire AFB, N.J.; 541st and 
th Fits., Keesler AFB, Miss.; 
th and 421st Fits., Orlando MAP, 
; and the 32nd Sq., 422nd and 
rd Fits., Ellington AFB, Tex. 
Jso: the 543rd and 424th Fits., 
arillo AFB, Tex.; 425th Fit., 
csdale AFB, La.; 544th and 426th 
., Scott AFB, ill; 545th and 416th 
, Hamilton AFB, Calif.; and 
th Fit., of Castle AFB, Calif, 
wo units, the 427th Fit., of Dyess 
J, Tex., and the 25th Sq., of 
/is AFB, Calif., will be activated 
month. 
:heduled for activation June 8, 

542nd Fit., Maxwell AFB, Ala.; 
i Sq., Chanute AFB, 111.; and the 
th Fit., of McChord AFB, Wash. 
lated for discontinuance on June 
are USAF Reserve hospitals at 



March AFB, Calif., Boston, Mass., 
MacDill AFB, Fla., Fort Worth, Tex., 
Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Balti- 
more, Md., Hamilton AFB, Calif., 
and Algiers, La. 

Also to be discontinued on a 
phased schedule, through FY '65 are 
casualty staging organizations at NAS 
Willow Grove, Pa.; Scott AFB, 111.; 
Denver, Colo.; Ellington AFB, Tex.; 
McGuire AFB, N. J.; Shreveport, La.; 
Seattle, Wash.; and Luke AFB, Ariz. 



v3ixty Air Force Systems Com- 
mand Reservists from all parts of 
the United States are slated to attend 
the 1964 Annual Procurement Man- 
agement Training Seminar at Boiling 
AFB, Washington, D. C, June 6-7. 

The seminar is being sponsored by 
the Eastern Contract Management 
Region, Olmsted AFB, Pennsylvania 
and organized through the efforts of 
New York Contract Management Dis- 
trict Reserves. Its theme will be "Cost 
Reduction and the Air Force." 

Among the speakers scheduled to 
address the Reservists are: Maj. Gen- 




eral Brooke E. Allen, Headquarters 
Command, Boiling AFB; Brig. Gen- 
eral G. F. Keeling, deputy chief of 
staff for Production-Procurement, 
AFSC; the Honorable George E. 
Fouch, deputy assistant to the Secre- 
tary of Defense; and others. 

Mr. John A. Lang Jr., administra- 
tive assistant to Secretary of the Air 
Force, Eugene M. Zuckert, will be 
the honored guest at a luncheon to 
be given during the seminar. 



eSWS 









* 



Reservist s of 963 1 st Recovery Sq. 
(San Jose, Calif.), demonstrate 
technique, using de-icer equip- 
ment to decontaminate a 
"radioactive" C-1 19. 







n 



CIVIL AIR 



^ /\ I l V J 1 j workshops . . . airlift . . . Search/ Rescue . . . planes 



C 



ivil Air Patrol Aerospace Education 
Workshops will be conducted again 
this summer at nearly 200 colleges 
and universities and will provide spe- 
cial tour opportunities for 85 qualified 
Air Force Reservists. 

Hq CAP-USAF advises that Re- 
servists will be assigned to workshops 
scheduled for June and July at the 
following locations: 

Tuscaloosa, Ala.; Tempe, Ariz.; 
San Jose and Cotati, Calif.; Alamosa, 
Ft. Collins and Greeley, Colo.; Wash- 
ington, D. C; Tallahassee, Fla.; Poca- 
tello and Moscow, Idaho; Macomb, 
111.; Lafayette, Ind.; Cedar Falls, Des 
Moines and Ames, Iowa; Hays and 
Pittsburg, Kans.; Baltimore, Md.; 
Mankato and Moorehead, Minn.; 
Hattiesburg, Miss.; Cape Girardeau 
and Kirksville, Mo.; Bozeman, Mis- 
soula and Dillion, Mont.; Peru and 
Wayne, Neb.; Reno, Nev.; Pembroke, 
N. C; Grand Forks, N. D.; Oxford, 
Ohio; Memphis and Murfreesboro, 
Tenn.; Commerce, Tex.; Cedar City 
and Ogden, Utah; Charlottesville and 
EUensburg, Va.; Fairmont, W. Va.; 
and Platteville, Wise. 

Meanwhile, substantial increases in 
airlift support of CAP's special sum- 
mer activities is scheduled by Air 
Force Reserve troop carrier wings. 
The cancellation of this year's Exer- 
cise Swift Strike III provides this 
increased support. 

Some 8,000 to 10,000 CAP cadets 
will take part in summer encamp- 
ments slated at 36 Air Force bases 



from Maine to Hawaii, June through 
August of this year. More than one- 
third of the cadets will be airlifted 
by Air Force Reserve crews. 

CAP also receives airlift support 
from the Military Air Transport Serv- 
ice and the Air National Guard. 

In addition to the summer encamp- 
ments, the Air Force Reserve will 
provide air transport for cadets tak- 
ing part in CAP's National Drill Com- 
petition to be held at the U.S. Air 
Force Academy, Colorado Springs, 
Colorado, August 3-7. Cadets from 
each of CAP's eight regions plus 
teams from Puerto Rico, Alaska and 
Hawaii, will compete. 

Air Force Reserve planes will pick 
up competing teams at designated 
"home stations" on August 3, and fly 
them to the Academy. Teams from 
Puerto Rico, Alaska and Hawaii, will 
be flown by the Military Air Trans- 
port Service to Charleston, McChord 
and Travis AFBs where they will 
board Reserve aircraft for the flight 
to the Academy. Reserve crews will 
return the cadets to their embarca- 
tion points on August 7. 

Officials estimate that airlift sup- 
port by Air Force Reserve this sum- 
mer will result in savings of more 
than $26,000 in transportation costs. 

Coincidentally, CAP reported that 
Air Force Reserve cooperation 
reached an all time high during 1963, 
with Reservists recording 25,929 
hours of participation in various 
CAP programs. 




12 



Seventy T-34 trainer aircraft, pictured above, declared excess by the Air 
Force, are slated for addition to CAP's growing corporate-owned air fleet. 



In summing up its activities, CA 
reported that its pilots flew nearly tw< 
thirds of all flying hours expended o 
search and rescue missions in tl 
United States last year. 

The CAP pilots logged a total < 
17,697 out of 27,440 flying houj 
expended by agencies under the col 
trol of USAF's Air Rescue Servio 
CAP pilots also flew an addition 
1,078 out of 3,299 flying hours e; 
pended by the Air Rescue Service i 
Alaska during 1963. 

CAP personnel who took part i 
the search and rescue operation f< 
the crew of a B-52 bomber whic 
crashed near Cumberland, Marylani 
on January 13, 1964, have received 
copy of a letter from General Curt 
E. LeMay, commending CAP for i 
role in the mission. 

Addressed to CAP National Con 
mander, Colonel Paul C. Ashworti 
it read in part: 

"I consider it a privilege to conv< 
both personally and on behalf of tl 
Secretary of the Air Force, our sii 
cere thanks for the assistance rej 
dered by the Civil Air Patrol affi 
the B-52 crash on January 13 . . 
The Air Force is grateful to all wl 
participated . . . Two airmen ov 
their lives to this timely and efficiei 
rescue effort." 

CAP's own air fleet, which ii 
eludes approximately 4,200 corpora 
or membership owned light aircral 
will receive a significant boost th 
year through the acquisition of sort 
seventy T-34 trainer aircraft declare 
as excess by the Air Force. 

CAP's National Executive Con 
mittee has authorized $204,000 < 
corporation funds to underwrite ri 
pairs and modification to the plan< 
before they are distributed. 

Assignment of the T-34s will b 
made by a distribution formula whic 
will insure that each CAP wing d< 
siring aircraft will receive at least ont 
Interested wings must deposit $1,50 
"earnest money" with their applies 
tion for aircraft on or before July .' 
1964. In addition, those receiving th 
trainers will be required to reimburs 
CAP's national treasury a propoi 
tionate share of repair and modifies 
tion costs in excess of their deposit. 




r\n aerospace force is a 
nilitary organization spe- 
cializing in use of mis- 
siles, aircraft, satellites and 
other kinds of piloted and 
pilotless vehicles and sys- 
tems operating in the at- 
mosphere near Earth and 
in the space beyond. 

This is a compilation of 
basic facts and Air Force 
cojj9»pfs r in support of na- 
tional policy. It has beerr 
prepared for your conveni- 
ence from official pub- 
lished materials and major 
addresses by key person- 
nel of the Air Force and 
Department of Defense. 



IJLerospace is an operationally indivisible medium con- 
sisting of the total expanse beyond the Earth's surface. 

What is the main job of the Air Force? The Air 

Force is organizing, training and equipping Air Force 
units to take part in the achievement of our national 
objectives in any intensity of conflict. The Air Force 
must provide forces to gain and maintain general aero- 
space supremacy. 

It uses many kinds of aircraft and missiles in its 
forces. It is working to constantly improve these systems 
and to develop piloted and pilotless spacecraft and 
aerospacecraft. 

The Air Force must operate at any altitude above 
Earth that may be necessary to defeat enemy aerospace 
forces. And it must support our allies and take part, 
whenever superior aerospace power is required, in lim- 
ited war. In the case of insurgency and guerrilla activities 
the Air Force must be prepared to provide instructors 
to teach friendly local air forces the art of waging special 
air warfare operations. 

Enemy forces to be neutralized or destroyed by Air 
Force units may be on the surface of the Earth — on 
land or at sea — or in or beyond the atmosphere. 

The Air Force provides the primary offensive and 
defensive air forces for U. S. military forces in Europe 
and the Pacific — U.S. Air Forces Europe (USAFE) and 
Pacific Air Forces (PACAF) — as well as global stra- 
tegic airlift for all the U.S. Armed Forces, with Military 
Air Transport Service (MATS) — plus Strategic Air Com- 
mand (SAC) and the air components of unified com- 



mands, such as North American Air Defense CommJ 
(NORAD) and Strike Command (STRICOM). 

What does the Air Force do besides operate ah 
craft and missiles? You will see partial answers 1 
this question throughout this supplement. The Air I on 
is involved in exotic research and development project 
working with industry and Government agencies such j 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration ai 
Atomic Energy Commission and with private scicntis 
and institutes in the U.S. and overseas; is involved] 
tropical and arctic survival training and in work wi 
satellites and piloted spacecraft and aerospacecraft; at 
is pioneering, as it has for years, in new managemei 
techniques and automation systems. The Air Force 
at the hub of all the sciences and technologies as th< 
are related to man and his Earth-oriented environmei 
in aerospace. 

The Secretary of the Air Force, Eugene M. Zucket 
said: "Air Force facilities, plus its skilled and dedicato 
people, constitute a base for aerospace research th 
is by far the largest, most comprehensive and capab 
in the Free World. 

"However, the Air Force's primary responsibility 
to maintain aerospace supremacy for the Nation. It 
for this reason that we have developed the kind of aeri 
space military capability we have today — the ICBM' 
the Ballistic Missile Early Warning System, the Spac 
track facilities in which we identify and monitor i 
manmade objects in space, plus our global aircra 
operations." 









Basic Planning Concepts Stress Deterrence. . . 



The U.S. Air Force is the primary aerospace arm of 
the United States and plays a vital role in supporting 
our national objectives in peace and war. 



"Deterrence of war, general or otherwise, is our pri- 
mary national objective." — Eugene M. Zuckert, Sec- 
retary of the Air Force. 



What is Deterrence? According to Mr. Zuckert: "All 
of the factors that go into our ability to discourage an 
aggressor or preclude an attack by the obvious strength 
to crush it, we call deterrence." 

General Curtis E. LeMay, Air Force Chief of Staff 
has said: "the best military deterrence is founded on 
a military superiority that can be demonstrated or re- 
flected in a credible capability to wage and win war at 
the highest intensity as well as at all lesser intensities — 
using both offensive and defensive action. Such over- 
all force superiority is essential to the National objectives 
of deterring enemy provocations and aggressions in 
peacetime." 

How is Deterrence achieved? A major element of 
deterrence is having the capability to destroy an enemy's 
military force if he should attack — and having the enemy 
know that you have the ability and resolution to defend 



Counterforce has been described as the use of mi 
itary weapons against enemy rockets, airfields, ships, ar 
troops, and especially against the offensive weapons th 
can be used to injure us, rather than against cities. 

Tools of Deterrence? In order to support our Nation 
objectives and deter aggression the Air Force is mac 
up of a family of operating systems — air systems, ba 
listic missiles, and space vehicle systems. These and tl 
Air Force officers and airmen that man them are tl 
fundamental military aerospace forces of the Natioi 
Aerospace power embraces the entire aeronautical an 
astronautical capacity of the United States. Active mi 
itary forces, the Air Reserve Forces and their suppor 
ing facilities comprise a major component of aerospac 
power. 

The forces provided by the U.S. Air Force may t 
employed for the following purposes: in general wa 
to defeat the enemy as quickly as possible; in limite 
war, immediately to conduct operations wherever r< 
quired; and, in cold war, to conduct special operatior 
as directed. 

Air Force Strategy? "To meet the various challenge 
which may be posed by the enemy, we must be pn 
pared to act at the lowest level of conflict that will gai 
our objectives. However, we must constantly recogni2 
the absolute need to maintain a capability to prevail i 
the highest level of conflict. This will provide the cnem 



yourself. The ability to employ force against force is -%\ -»*wjth a clear incentive for restraint in initiating aggressiv 
needed. This is a counterforce capability. &&"> it acts at anv level." — General LeMai 



2AF 



V 



^ 



s» 









erospace Supremacy— for peace. . . 



luirements tor Supremacy? General LeMay lists 
systems the Air Force must maintain as: "A strategic 
:e of missiles and manned systems to provide dis- 
linating, highly accurate and flexible means of at- 
:ing strategic targets. Defensive systems, including 
mproved manned system, that can deal with incom- 
weapons and contribute to maximum survivability, 
onnaissance vehicles that can acquire reliable and 
iprehensive targeting information. Tactical aircraft 
missiles, equipped with both conventional and low- 
i nuclear weapons to perform the varied tasks re- 
ed as part of the air-ground team. And, finally, a 
;ndable and survivable network of command and 
trol systems." 



"Limited strategic conflict" is a term becoming more 
common in Air Force thinking. It refers to creating a 
capability to deter or defeat enemy aggression through 
the conduct of very precise and discriminating operations 
against selected military targets in the enemy homeland. 
Such a capability is designed to fill the gaps between the 
upper intensities of theater operations and the full-scale 
general nuclear war — thus to provide more options for 
controlled response. In limited strategic conflict the 
manned strategic aircraft provides unique capabilities 
which cannot be duplicated by other systems. Not the 
least of these is the capability of the crew to observe and 
report immediately the results of their mission and other 
vital on-the-spot information on the course of the war. 




•<5M S AIR FORCE FJ-406 



Mixed Force concept? The Commander in Chief 
AC, General Thomas S. Power, has said: "During 
past few years the Strategic Air Command has 
/ed from a bomber force to a mixed force of 
bers and missiles in which one is designed to sup- 
lent and complement the other. In my considered 
ion, the mixed force concept will be as valid in the 
)s as it is today . . . 

Ve have been able to prevent nuclear war to this 
because of the actions we have taken in the past, 
ns which have given us such overwhelming military 
riority as to make nuclear aggression against this 
try or its allies unthinkable. The action which we 
today will determine whether we can continue to 
• aggression in the 1970s by maintaining a credible 
convincing military superiority across the entire 
:rum of manned and unmanned strategic capability 
iderwater, in the air and, eventually, in space." 

i a Mixed Force? Aircraft are more versatile and 
)nsive — more flexible — than missiles. That is why 
Ur Force believes that an aerospace force must have 
missiles and aircraft to meet all the contingencies 
le many possible intensities of war that must be 
Ted through an ability to fight them successfully, 
ttempt to deter or fight a general war now or in the 
I's without using the unique advantages offered by 
led aircraft, would be knowingly to handicap the 
space force. 



The multiplicity of uses of strategic aircraft — their 
unique usability in most of the many possible intensities 
of conflict, their usability in possible conflicts any- 
where over the globe, their re-usability in prolonged 
crises, their ability to employ non-nuclear as well as 
nuclear weapons — qualifies them as systems ideally suited 
to the reasoned, regulated and selective application of 
force. Strategic aircraft are not one-war — all-out war — 
weapon systems. They are singularly versatile and re- 
sponsive — and controllable at all stages of operation. 



Afajor "tactical" commands. . . 

What is Strategic Air Command's Job? Strategic Air 
Command (SAC) is the U.S. long-range nuclear strike 
force comprising a mixture of combat aircraft and inter- 
continental ballistic missiles. It is responsible for the 
delivery over enemy targets of between 80 and 90 per- 
cent of the Free World's nuclear firepower. SAC's pri- 
mary mission is to prevent nuclear war through its ability 
to deliver this nuclear firepower to any part of the globe, 
even if subjected to surprise attack. SAC's blend of 
missiles and aircraft is continually maintained at the 
highest level of alert of any military force in history. 
Within the warning time provided by the Ballistic Mis- 
sile Early Warning System, half of SAC's ground alert 

SAC / next page 



3AF 



SAC / continued 

of bombers and tankers can be airborne and safe from 
enemy attack. In addition, a portion of SAC's B-52 
strength is in the air, within range of enemy targets, on 
airborne alert training, 24 hours a day. 

How ore Strategic Strikes Planned? At Strategic Air 
Command Headquarters, Offutt AFB, Nebraska, a single, 
integrated operational plan for initial United States re- 
taliatory strikes in case of global war has been devel- 
oped by the Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff under 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Directed by the Air Force 
general commanding Strategic Air Command, this joint 
staff blueprints wartime targets and selects the weapons 
to be used against them in the event of war. All the 
Armed Services are represented on the staff, and weapon 
systems include many kinds of systems — bombers, 
fighters, land-based missiles, air launched missiles and 
missile-armed submarines. 

Tactical Air Command's Job? Tactical Air Command 
(TAC) produces and maintains combat-ready forces 
capable of conducting worldwide tactical air operations. 
TAC would perform vital functions in general war, as 
well as in lesser intensities of conflict. It has a versatile 
array of supersonic jet fighters for air superiority, close 
air support and interdiction, plus reconnaissance and 
assault airlift aircraft. TAC is the air strike arm of the 
unified U.S. Strike Command. Using air-to-air refueling, 
it is ready on a moment's notice to deploy powerful, 
tailored packages of airpower nonstop to any spot on 
the globe. Support of the Army is a vital responsibility 
of TAC. This command trains personnel for the tactical 
air forces overseas and supervises the training of the 
majority of units of the Air Reserve Forces. 

"Our principal concern with regard to the Air Force 
tactical forces during the last three years has been the 
urgent need to build up adequate air support for the 
Army ground forces so that they could engage, if needed, 
in a sustained non-nuclear conflict. As I noted earlier, 
superior tactical airpower is essential to our position 
in Europe and would be of great importance in local war 
situations in any part of the world where our forces 
might be involved. A substantial improvement in tactical 
airpower has already been achieved. The tactical fighter 
forces have been increased from 16 wings at the end of 
fiscal year 1961, to 21 wings. The rate of procurement 
of Air Force tactical fighters and reconnaissance air- 
craft has been increased from 180 in fiscal year 1961 
to 435 in fiscal year 1964. In addition a Special Air 
Warfare Force has been created for counterinsurgency 
operations . . ." — Robert S. McNamara, Secretary of 
Defense. 

What is Military Air Transport Service's Job? Mili- 
tary Air Transport Service (MATS) operates a D-Day- 
ready global airlift system, including the air rescue, air 
weather, air photographic, and geodetic services for the 
Department of Defense, in accordance with wartime re- 
quirements established by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 
MATS maintains a 115,000-mile system of military air 
routes on a wartime readiness basis. This global airlift 
command of the Air Force operates at air bases around 
the world. To maintain a D-day-ready capability, MATS 
trains daily in accomplishing routine and special air- 
lift missions, and conducts frequent mobility training ex- 
ercises, troop deployments, and contingency and humani- 
tarian airlifts. 



4AF 



What is Air Defense Command's Job? Air Defeat 
Command (ADC) is organized, trained and equippq 
to defend the United States against aerospace attat 
ADC is the U.S. Air Force component of the J 
U.S. -Canadian North American Air Defense Comma 
(NORAD). It has the function of detection, identifier 
tion, interception, and destruction of manned bombd 
or intercontinental ballistic missile attack on the Noil 
American continent. This Air Force command provide 
more than 70 percent of the personnel and equipmefl 
used by NORAD. ADC administers, trains, and equip 
Air Force aerospace defense forces for top battle readi 
ness. It operates the Ballistic Missile Early Warning Syij 
tern (BMEWS) to detect and identify any intercontin 
ental ballistic missile attack, and Spacetrack which moni 
tors all manmade objects in space. 

What is Air Force Systems Command's Job? Ai 

Force Systems Command (AFSC) plays the principa 
role in the military space program. AFSC provides tn 
most up-to-date and effective management of Air Forq 
scientific and technical resources, and is the single man 
ager of all phases of acquisition of new aerospace sys 
terns. It must enable the Air Force to meet the maja 
space requirements of the Department of Defense, am 
provide research, development, tests, and engineering o 
satellites, boosters, space probes, and associated system 
necessary to support specific NASA projects and pro 
grams arising under basic agreements between DOD am 
NASA. The commander of AFSC directs the operation 
of seven divisions, seven research and test centers, an 
three contract management regions. The command man 
ages and controls approximately 300 installations o 
separate activities in the U.S. and overseas. 

Overseas Commands. . . 

Why Overseas Commands? Because America's dedi 
cation to the principles of freedom extends to nation 
requesting our assistance. Militarily, this requires activ 
participation by the Air Force in multi-nation organiza 
tions such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organizatioi 
(NATO) and the Southeast Asia Treaty Organizatioi 
(SEATO). 

Among many of its functions in support of thes 
global requirements, Air Force maintains four oversea 
commands: U.S. Air Forces in Europe (USAFE), U.S 
Air Forces Southern Command (USAFSO), Pacifi 
Air Forces (PACAF), and Alaskan Air Commani 
(AAC). A brief description of these overseas tactica 
commands and their missions follows: 

United States Air Forces in Europe is a powerfu 
American overseas air arm. It serves as a primary in 
strument in the western line of defense, where it stand 
constantly alert as a combat-ready force. Its responsi 
bility extends from the United Kingdom to Pakistan 
USAFE is the air arm of the unified U.S. Europeai 
Command. Its missions in support of Air Force polic; 
are directed by Headquarters U.S. Air Force. In timi 
of war, command functions would be directed b; 
SHAPE (Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers, Eu 
rope). The command's weapon systems are ready fo 
strike, defense, reconnaissance, and transport operations 
They include Europe's only combat missile wing stra 
tegically placed along the Iron Curtain. USAFE air 
craft earmarked for use in North Atlantic Treaty Or 
ganization constitute the largest single contribution o 
any nation in the 15-country alliance. 



5. Air Forces Southern Command is the air com- 
ent of a unified command (U.S. Southern Com- 
ld) operated under the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 
^FSO, utilizing the advisory services of our Air 
ce training missions, is the major USAF instru- 
ttality outside the U.S. directed toward the develop- 
it and improvement in the capabilities of the air 
es of Latin America; operates the USAF School 
Latin America and the USAF Tropic Survival 
aol; administers the Air Force phase of the Military 
istance Program, including training in the continental 
ted States; provides special air warfare training for 
n American Air Force personnel with appropriate 
•hasis on potential civic action benefits; and conducts 
ch and rescue missions throughout its area. 

ific Air Forces is the U. S. Air Force air arm in the 

[fic-Far East and is responsible, in conjunction with 
i allies, for maintaining control of the air over the 
ific-Far East. It is the air component of the unified 
fie Command. Operating over more than one-third 
le Earth's surface, PACAF is prepared to react swift- 
o any aggression with both defensive or offensive 
es. Its forces are composed of nuclear and conven- 
ally equipped fighter-bombers; Mace tactical mis- 
; reconnaissance aircraft; heavy cargo aircraft; and 
light conventional strafing and bombing aircraft most 
;tive in waging special air warfare operations. Air 
mse of the Hawaiian Islands is performed under 
?AF through its operational control of the Hawaii 
National Guard. PACAF also assists in training 
idly air forces, including Vietnamese, in offensive 
defensive air tactics and techniques. 

;kan Air Command maintains a far-reaching warn- 
system and an extra strength fighter squadron to 
:e the 586,000 square miles of Alaska, some 50 
s away from the Soviet Union. The Alaskan Air 
imand electronic alerting system is maintained by 
lircraft control and warning squadrons and 33 White 
e communications installations. In temperatures 
;ing from minus 70 to plus 100 degrees, USAF 
er aircraft are poised to intercept and destroy aerial 
essors. A AC is the air arm of the unified Alaskan 
imand and provides base facilities for the Strategic 
Command. It provides the major strength of the 
;kan NORAD region, the watchdog of the northern- 
t approaches to the continental United States. 



her Vital Commands. . . 

he following commands and agencies perform func- 
; that are necessary to achieve Air Force objectives. 

Force Communications Service (AFCS) provides 
services essential to the successful coordination, 
mand, and control of aerospace forces: (1) com- 
ications and (2) flight facilities, fixed and jmobile. 
rating and maintaining a global network of more 
5 million miles of communications channels and 
arldwide system of more than 1,500 electronic aids 
ir navigation and air traffic control facilities, AFCS 
ates on-base and long-haul communications net- 
cs for Air Force commanders. Long-haul circuitry 
titutes a major portion of the defense communi- 
>ns system operated in support of the Defense Com- 
ications Agency. 



Continental Air Command (CONAC) provides the 
active duty Air Force with ready units and ready indi- 
viduals of the Air Force Reserve to meet emergency 
requirements. These include 15 troop carrier wings, 45 
troop carrier groups with 700 aircraft, 5 air rescue 
squadrons, over 100 support type units (communica- 
tions squadrons, medical units and air terminal squad- 
rons), and a network of Air Force Reserve recovery 
groups and squadrons. These, plus many other units 
and individuals, constitute the more than 300,000 mem- 
bers of the Air Force Reserve. Air Force Reservists per- 
form more than 50 percent of Army airborne training, 
and provide an Air Force recovery capability during 
emergencies. CONAC also supervises the Civil Air 
Patrol, an Air Force auxiliary which operates 4,000 light 
aircraft, 4,000 vehicles of various types, and a 14,000- 
station radio network. 

Headquarters Command supports and services Head- 
quarters USAF and the other Air Force units in the 
Washington area. The command also administers USAF 
Missions, MAAG's and Air Attache offices throughout 
the world. In the Nation's Capital, the command is re- 
sponsible for supervision of Boiling AFB, Andrews 
AFB, and the Malcolm Grow USAF Clinical Center 
which serves nearly a hundred thousand military per- 
sonnel and dependents. 

United States Air Force Security Service (USAFSS) 

provides communications security services for the U.S. 
aerospace forces to insure that information transmitted 
by electrical means by these forces is safeguarded en- 
route. Its functions include collection and analysis of 
all types of unclassified, electrical Air Force commu- 
nications to determine the effectiveness of communica- 
tions security measures used, and meeting all the re- 
quirements of the U.S. aerospace forces for crypto- 
graphic materials and equipment. Additionally, USAF 
Security Service occasionally conducts research in com- 
munications phenomena in support of various elements 
of the U.S. Government. 

Aeronautical Chart and Information Center (ACIC) 

produces aeronautical charts, air target materials, flight 
information publications, geodetic missile data, astro- 
nautical and geophysical charts, and reference materials 
for Department of Defense commands operating in aero- 
space and to government agencies such as the Federal 
Aviation Agency and the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration. ACIC operates and maintains 
the USAF Central Print and Index Library and the DOD 
depository of aerial, radarscope, and ground photogra- 
phy. It distributes from 90 to 1 10 million copies of its 
publications each year. ACIC is charting the Moon for 
NASA, and provides specially designed space charts 
used by the astronauts. 

Air Force Accounting and Finance Center (AFAFC) 

accomplishes centralized Air Force accounting and fi- 
nance operational functions and provides technical su- 
pervision, advice, and guidance to Air Force accounting 
and finance field activities. Centralized activities include 
issuing 500,000 checks; issuing 100,000 savings bonds 
monthly and another 150,000 bonds quarterly; process- 
ing some 6,000 reports monthly; producing more than 
100 accounting and management reports monthly; and 
a host of other centralized activities. 



5AF 



B-58 (SAC) 



Examples of primary aircraft 

currently used by the 

"tactical" major air commands. 



Air Training Command (ATC) recruits and trains. It 
conducts basic military training courses for some 125,- 
000 airmeu and officers each year, then forms them into 
skilled technicians, pilots, or navigators at its technical 
and flying training centers. ATC also operates mobile 
and field training detachments throughout the Free 
World, training more than 200,000 students each year. 
It provides more than 1,300 new pilots and 1,000 new 
navigators annually. It also trains some personnel of 
the Free World's allies. It conducts medical specialist 
training, and military instruction for legal officers and 
chaplains. ATC's primary and advanced technical train- 
ing of nonrated specialists provides more than 150,000 
graduates yearly from some 1,200 courses. 

Air Force Logistics Command (AFLC) helps insure that 
the Air Force combat and missile units throughout the 
world are thoroughly equipped and ready for instant 
action. AFLC keeps its procurement, supply, mainte- 
nance, and transportation functions attuned to the instant 
needs of its customers — the operational commands at 
home and overseas. 

Air University (AU) conducts advanced professional 
military education programs for Air Force officers. 
(Substantial numbers of U.S. Army, Navy, and Allied 
officers also attend AU professional education schools.) 
It graduates some 2,000 officers and airmen annually 
from resident and civilian accredited courses in the arts 
and sciences, medicine, and engineering. Another 5,000 
officers and civilians complete special courses conducted 
both in residence and at civilian schools. Its Air Force 
Reserve Officers Training Corps program is the primary 
source of Air Force officers. AU operates courses in 
the employment of aerospace vehicles and weapons, con- 
ducts a modest research program related to its courses 
of instruction, and provides nearly a hundred corre- 
spondence courses for more than 356,000 students. 

Office of Aerospace Reseprch (OAR) is the agency 
responsible for planning, programming, and managing 
the L'SAF Research Program. The research is accom- 
plished by Air Force laboratories and through the use 
of contracts and grants with colleges, universities, and 
industrial laboratories. Research results are made avail- 
able to government agencies and the civilian scientific 
community. OAR provides a high-latitude launch cap- 
ability at Fort Churchill, Canada, for research by De- 
partment of Defense, National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, and Canadian agencies. In conjunction 
with Air Force Systems Command, OAR approves, pro- 
grams, and allocates payload space on sounding rockets, 
deep space probes, and satellite vehicles for the Air 
Force Research and Exploratory Development Program. 

U. S. Air Force Academy is a major source of newly 
commissioned officers and provides instruction, motiva- 
tion, and experience to all cadets so they will have the 
knowledge and qualities of leadership to take on increas- 
ing military responsibilities. The Academy strives to 
attain certain minimum objectives — a basic four-year 
education in airmanship and related sciences, the hu- 
manities and other broadening disciplines; an under- 
standing of aerospace power with all its capabilities and 
the significant role it plays in national defense. 



6AF 






W Important are People and Logistics. . . 



pie? Training for an Air Force career is not easily 
eved nor cheaply bought. While men of high purpose 
dependable performance can be found in all walks 
fe, our Air Force, at the same time, requires a steady 
dependable supply of men educated in the traditions 
ational service and trained to the ready acceptance of 
t responsibilities and to the discipline which such re- 
.sibilities impose upon them. 

he Chief of Staff recently commented that the men 
women of the Air Force are ". . . professionals who 
pride in their work. Without them our weapons and 
plicated machines would be meaningless." This ap- 

not only to the people performing the highly pub- 
id jobs of flying, research, etc., but also to those 

are doing less glamorous jobs. Aerospace power 
i not be attained without, among many others, the 
lanic, the clerk, the cook, supply man, information 
lician, etc. There is a responsible job for everyone 
e Air Force. 

sties? Lieutenant General Thomas P. Gerrity, Dep- 
Dhief of Staff, Systems and Logistics, states: 
sfficient managers are essential to every operation of 
Kit Force. This is especially true of logistics, the art 



and science of determining, acquiring, distributing and 
maintaining the equipment and materiel needed by our 
military forces. 

"In today's Aerospace Force, where all our jobs must 
be performed more efficiently at less expense in the face 
of increasing costs, the role of the efficient logistics man- 
ager is more important than ever before. 

"The work is intriguing, challenging and vital to all 
Air Force units and their missions. In armed conflict 
logistics means the difference between victory and defeat. 
Our resources and equipment must be second to none, 
and even then they are worthless without effective logistics 
managers to direct their procurement, utilization and 
maintenance. 

"We are entering the Age of Space but that's not go- 
ing to drastically change our way of life. Logistics sys- 
tems — like aerospace hardware — are going to be based 
here on Earth. We will probably develop a centralized 
inventory control system which will control our assets 
worldwide and the supporting communications networks 
will include the use of satellites. Today logistics is the 
lifeblood of the Air Force. It is a complex business — a 
demanding and busy one. But it will become even more 
demanding in the years ahead." 



Force Trend 



Tie weapons we have in the '70s will depend upon 
iecisions we make today in research and develop- 
." — Eugene M. Zuckert 

eutenant General James Ferguson, Deputy Chief of 
i Research and Development, stresses two important 
rs in the future of our Aerospace Forces: 
)ver the next five years, the Air Force has proposed 
is toward two objectives: (1) To augment, by use 
>ace systems, the existing military capabilities of 
;d States terrestrial forces. (2) To develop a military 
»1 capability for the protection of United States in- 
: in space. 

jmentation: By use of space devices, we expect 
lhance the capabilities of the Earth-based defense 
ire of the United States. For example: 
space-based communications can improve the re- 
ity and scope of command and control systems; 

banned Aircraft— development and plans. . . 



• surveillance of atmospheric weather from space can 
provide information regarding cloud conditions in target 
and refueling areas; 

• space systems may furnish a means of active defense 
against ballistic missiles and of 

• warning that a missile attack is under way. 
"Military Patrol: The term 'military patrol' refers 
broadly to an ability to determine at all times what is 
happening in near-space, whether there is a threat pres- 
ent, and to deal with it if necessary. Military patrol 
capabilities for the space region could provide on-call 
protection for U.S. space activities, both scientific and 
military, in event of hostile enemy action in the space 
region. This objective includes: 

• an improved detection and tracking system; 

• a means of inspecting unidentified space devices; 

• a means of disabling hostile satellites, if this should 
be required in the national interest; 

• lastly, a system for continually monitoring such 
space phenomena as radiation and solar flares, the latter 
being essential for prolonged space operations." 



2 A— A new, experimental jet aircraft, the A- 11 
ntly redesignated the YF-12A,] has been developed 
se by the U.S. Air Force as a possible long-range 
:eptor. The A-ll has been tested in sustained flight 
ore than 2,000 miles an hour, and at altitudes of 
than 70,000 feet. This advanced experimental air- 



craft is capable of high-speed, high-altitude and long- 
range performance of thousands of miles. 

The performance of the A-ll far exceeds that of any 
other aircraft in the world today. The detailed perform- 
ance of the A-ll aircraft remains strictly classified. — ■ 
Extracted from President Johnson's press conference. 



Latest development 

in the field of 

manned interceptors. 




YF-12A 



7AF 



C- 1 4 1— "The C-141 may open up entirely new vistas 
in troop carrier operations. For example, it might prove 
to be entirely feasible to load troops and their equip- 
ment in the United States and fly them directly to the 
battle area overseas, instead of moving them by strategic 
airlift to an overseas assembly point and then loading 
them and their equipment on troop carriers. Thus, the 
line of demarcation between the strategic airlift mission 
and the troop carrier or assault mission may, in time, 
become less important. This type of operations might 
require certain improvements in global communications 
and control and also possibly some changes in organiza- 
tion. In fact, we are now completing a very compre- 
hensive study of the air transport function in the light of 
the equipment changes now being made. . . ." — Robert 
S. McNamara. 

"The C-141 is expected to provide the type of modern 
airlift capability the MATS airlift force must have; and, 
as you can readily understand, we feel that the C-141 
will rapidly become the backbone of our forces much as 
the C-124 is today. Any spot on the globe will be with- 
in one-stop range of the C-141, with a substantial pay- 
load. The ability to airlift men and materiel these dis- 
tances, at jet speed and in such quantity is unprecedented. 
Yet when We look ahead even further, we must say that 
this is not enough. "General Joe W. Kelly, Cmdr., MATS. 




Gigantic transport for the 1970s— For future aiij 
requirements the MATS Commander states: "Air FJ 
estimators and planners have formulated requirementlj 
a new aircraft. ... It will be extremely large and J 
great range — capable of a more than 4,000-nautic 
mile range with more than a 100,000 pound paylJ 
This would be a 400 to 500-mile-an-hour, four-tol 
turbofan aircraft, larger than any known airplane tod 
. . . Cargo capabilities all the way from 75 to mc 
than 100 tons have been proposed and the aird 
would probably have aerial delivery capability. An a 
craft of this size could lift men and virtually all typeg 
military equipment to nearly all potential trouble sp< 
on the Earth, non-stop, and land on modest airfields^ 
relatively small force of such airplanes would be al 
to satisfy nearly all outsize peacetime and emergency! 
quirements as we can envision them today." 



What is Space? 



The expanse (perhaps limitless) which surrounds the celestial bodies of the universe. 



"Our first and continuing objective is to develop the 
peaceful uses of outer space, but we are not unmindful 
of the threats to peace on Earth which would result from 
the exclusive mastery of space by any power seeking to 
perpetuate earthly aggressions." — President Johnson. 

Air Force works in close harmony with the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in joint 
efforts to explore the peaceful uses of space and its po- 
tential military value. The Air Force provides boosters 
and launch services for many NASA projects. The Space 
Systems Division of the Air Force Systems Command has 
supervised the launching for NASA of all the astronauts 
who orbited the Earth in the Mercury Project. It launched 
more than 90 percent of the U.S. satellites and space 
probes in 1962, including Ranger IV, the first U.S. 
spacecraft to reach the Moon, and the Mariner II Venus 
space probe for NASA. 

Future Aerospace Systems. . . 

What is the Manned Orbiting Laboratory? Ac- 
cording to General LeMay, ". . . the next major step 

toward the achievement 
of future space capabil- 
ities is the Manned Orbit- 
ing Laboratory (MOL) 
which was approved for 
development under Air 
Force management. The 
MOL will provide a 
means to fulfill the com- 
pelling requirements to 
acquire information es- 
sential to determining ac- 



8AF 




curately the threat from space, the usefulness and! 
capabilities of man-in-space, and the unique advantaj 
which may accrue from military space operations. It j 
also serve as a platform to support testing of equipmi 
and procedures in the environment in which they wilE 
used." 

The MOL will consist of an orbiting pressurized c 
inder about the size of a small house trailer and \ 
permit astronauts to move about freely in it withoul 
space suit and conduct observations and experiments 
periods up to one month. It will be attached td 
modified Gemini capsule and lifted into orbit by a Ti 
III booster. Astronauts will be seated in the modS 
Gemini capsule during launch, and will move to j 
laboratory after injection into orbit. After completi 
of their tasks in space they will return to the capa 
which will then be detached from the laboratory to] 
turn to Earth. 

The design of the MOL vehicle will permit rendezv< 
in space between the orbiting laboratory and a seco 
Gemini capsule, so that relief crews could replace origjj 
crews. The first manned flight of the MOL is expected I 
in 1967 or early 1968. 

What is Gemini? Project Gemini calls for the devq 
ment and flight of a two-man Mercury-type spacecn 
The Gemini missions will be used to develop the I 
niques of rendezvous and docking (joining two obje 
in orbit) and to test the space-pilot's ability to carry < 
varied tasks under prolonged weightlessness. Man! 
operational flights arc scheduled to begin in 1964. Gem 
is a NASA-managed project, with the Air Force pi 
viding launch support of the Titan 11 and the Atl 
Agcna rendezvous target vehicle. Twelve Air Force i 
pcriments will be flown on Gemini missions. 






at is Project Apollo? Next step after Gemini is 
ject Apollo in which three space pilots are scheduled 
make a landing on the Moon and return. An ad- 
ced Saturn booster is being prepared by NASA for 
ject Apollo. The Air Force will work closely with 
SA on the Apollo Project. 

at is the X-15? An Air Force-NASA cooperative 
*ram, the X-15 provides data on piloted, maneuver- 
! flight. Released in the air from a modified B-52, the 
5 was flown to heights of 250,000 feet and 314,750 
in 1962. The flights were official world records set 
Joseph A. Walker, NASA, and Maj. Robert M. 
ite, USAF, respectively, at Edwards AFB, California, 
ker also flew the X-15 to a speed of 4,104 m.p.h. 
June 27, 1962. Information on aerodynamic and 
ctural heating, structural dynamics, supersonic and 
;rsonic aerodynamics, and stability and control was 
lined, evaluated, and reported. Equally important, 
ever, is the fact that a piloted system, designed for 
it at speeds to 6,600 feet per second and to altitudes 
!50,000 feet provides extensive operational experi- 
i for advanced systems on a routine basis. In this 
e, the X-15 program has provided invaluable experi- 
! for future aeronautical and space activities of the 
ed States. 

of is LASER? Taken from the words Light Amplifi- 
)n by Stimulated Emission of Radiation, it can direct 
ncentrated beam of light across great distances with 
-me precision. It has scientific and industrial uses, 
m be used to create temperatures millions of times 
sr than the surface of the Sun. With an increase in 
energy level of a LASER beam, or with more 
ise aiming techniques, it might have increasingly 
ructive and lethal effects. All of its uses have not 
j fully developed. The commander of the Air Force 
mns Command has said that "this revolutionary dis- 
ry may prove to be even more important to the world 
the development of the ballistic missile, the discov- 
Df the transistor. . . . The LASER will have a pro- 
d impact on every scientific and technical discipline." 

er Protects? Air Force Systems Command plans 
truction of a portable 10-million volt lightning ma- 
; to assist scientists studying effects of lightning 
j on weapon systems. AFSC also announced begin- 
of construction of a $3.5 million spacecraft simula- 
It will be used to train astronauts for space flight, 
e intercepts, and orbital rendezvous. The simulator 
:ing built at the Aerospace Research Pilot School, 
ards AFB, California. 

grant of $6 million has been made by the Office 
aerospace Research for a laboratory equipped to 
:e the strongest magnetic fields in the world. It is 
ed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 
bridge. Magnetic fields 500,000 times the strength 
e Earth's can be produced continuously for experi- 
s. Previous laboratory-produced magnetic fields 
one-fifth this strength. 

ithin the realm of systems improvement come the 
wing: Minuteman II will have twice the accuracy 
inuteman I, producing the same improved effective- 
against hard point targets as a yield increase of 8- 
. . . the F-l 1 1A will give Air Force a "tactical" air- 
more than double the range and several times the 
_ous payload ... the Mobile Mid-Range Ballistic 
ile will have a mobility untargetable by the enemy, 
uld be deployed anywhere in the world by air in a 
days. 




Hi 

■■■1 









■i 



TITAN III C: Apollo launcher 
readied for future Moon probes. 




9AF 




Appraisal by the Secretary of the Air Force 






3 * 



Ully appraisal for 1964 indicates continuing increase in airpower. All 

IWI the Atlas and Titan missile squadrons were operational by the enc 

III 1963. Our total U.S. strategic power, the backbone and starting pi 

of deterrence, will more than double in 1964 when new Minuteman strati 

missile wings become operational. 

"The strategic bombers, however, become another year older. We 
seeking a new manned system which will give us multiple options, flexibil 
controlled responses, and the ability to limit damage and still be effectivi 
points lower on the rising curve of intensity of conflict, i.e., at points be 
the peak of strategic missile barrage. 

"In the tactical area, in 1964 we will add new squadrons of F-105s, 
have the first operational F-4Cs, which started out as a carrier-based N 
fighter and is now the highest performing fighter in any Service. 

"We have scheduled for the end of the year the first flight of the F-l 
which, with its variable sweep wing, will be the most versatile fighter in 
world. These weapon systems — the F-105s, the F-4Cs and the F-l 11 
mean new airpower for the STRICOM [U.S. Strike Command] the o 
bined Army-Air Force force formed for quick deployment to any pan 
the world. 

"Airlift is a key element of these forces. Late this year the great ne\* 
141 military cargo transport becomes operational. It can carry 16 tons i 
stop to Japan and 35 tons non-stop to Europe. It is the first plane desig 
from scratch for high-speed cargo handling and transport. 

"Today's appraisals of airpower must also cover the space front. . 
The prospect of a defense requirement in space may afford a startling example of what new technologies can d 
the costs of military preparedness. The 'increased cost— cum-technology' process has been accelerating since W 
War II and makes inevitable the rigid economy measures which President Johnson has ordered. 

"With economy as a major premise ... the job of the military and civilian heads of the Services becomes 
of protecting substance, of preserving fighter strength. We must make sure that savings are not made by any tnmr 
which might weaken existing forces." — Eugene M. Zuckert. 




Summary: "Status and Future of the Air Force . 



D 



uring the past year the Air Force has continued its 
program of increasing its tactical air and airlift forces, 
its Special Air Warfare forces and intercontinental 
ballistic missile force. 

Its aerospace defense systems for continental defense 
have been further strengthened, and great contribu- 
tions have been made in advancing the space programs 
of the Department of Defense and the National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration. 

In developing and maintaining air and space sys- 
tems for national defense, the Air Force is guided by 
the Department of Defejise policy that our Armed 
Forces must be able to meet a variety of challenges 
which may be posed by the enemy. 

"There is no question," says the Secretary of De- 
fense, "but that today our strategic retaliatory forces 
are fully capable of destroying the Soviet target sys- 
tem, even after absorbing an initial surprise attack." 
These strategic forces include the long-range bombers, 
the air-to-surface and decoy missiles, and the refuel- 
ing tankers; the land-based strategic missiles; and the 
systems for their command and control. 

This is what is called a "mixed force" — a force of 
piloted aircraft and missiles, which gives greater ver- 
satility than only one kind of strategic system. 

While the B-47 strategic aircraft are being phased 
out, work is under way on a study of the potentials of 
a new advanced strategic aircraft that would serve as 
an airborne missile platform. 



Our strategic missile forces are being modern 
as they grow in size. The Atlas and Titan ICBMs 
now completely deployed. Our strategic missile foi 
which almost tripled in fiscal year 1963, will have E 
than doubled again in the period ending in Jum 
this year. Hundreds of the Minuteman ICBM are r< 
underground for quick response if needed. By this . 
600 of the Minuteman I missiles are expected t( 
in place; and by June 1965, 800 should be ready, 
eluded in the fiscal year 1964 budget are funds 
the first increment of 150 of the improved Minute 
II ICBMs. 

At Strategic Air Command Headquarters, 
AFB, Nebraska, a single, integrated operational 
for initial United States retaliatory strikes in cas 



BMEWS 
early warning 



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COMMAND POST 
relays orders 


, 



?al war has been developed by the Joint Strategic 
get Planning Staff under the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 
ected by the Air Force general commanding Stra- 
c Air Command, this joint staff blueprints war- 
I targets and selects the weapons to be used against 
■n in the event of war. All the Armed Services are 
resented on the staff, and weapon systems include 
types of strategic systems — bombers, fighters, land- 
ed missiles, air-launched missiles and missile-armed 
marines. 

^ new ballistic missile, the Mobile Mid-Range Bal- 
c Missile (MMRBM), is being designed to fill the 
ie gap between the 400-mile Pershing and the 
!;er-range Polaris and Intercontinental range ICBMs. 

MMRBM, says the Air Force Chief of Staff, will 
lplement tactical aircraft and "will considerably 
•rove our overall ability to counter opposing forces 
svery level of conflict." 
Command and control of all these weapon systems 

task needing constant study to insure the greatest 
;d, reliability and ability to survive in war. Air 
ce command and control systems have been con- 
lously improved during the past year, 
aerospace defense — defense of the atmosphere and 

space beyond it — occupies a great amount of Air 
ce effort. 

aerospace defense activities during the past year 
e highlighted by achievement of full operational 
us of the Ballistic Missile Early Warning System 
4EWS) and a new airborne electronic system. The 
orne system is called Airborne Long Range Input 
-RI). On the basis of a Department of Defense and 
th American Air Defense Command study, the Air 
ce also realigned its air defense forces, dispersing 
iy of its interceptors to more separated points, 
he Air Force Chief of Staff says that "to keep 
| with the growing complexity of the Soviet missile 

bomber threat we need to improve our capability 
etect and track missiles, satellites, and manned air- 
t, and to develop a capability to destroy all types 
'eapons." 

ubmarine-Launched Ballistic Missiles (SLBM's) are 
:w threat for aerospace defense forces to face. Air 
:e has proposed a program to meet the problem. 



The new requirement for development of stronger 
U. S. forces to perform the entire range of combat op- 
erations short of general nuclear war has resulted in 
increases in Air Force aviation functions. 

The Air Force must provide the primary air capabil- 
ity not only for U. S. unified commands throughout the 
world, but for the U. S. Strike Command— the U. S.- 
based unified command for which the Air Force pro- 
vides the air component. It supports STRICOM with 
units of the Tactical Air Command and the Military 
Air Transport Service. 

In STRICOM the Army and Air Force are working 
together constantly in exercises and tests to develop 
effective air/ground forces for use anywhere they may 
be needed. Exercise Big Lift was the largest of these 
exercises. The Air Force-operated Military Air Trans- 
port Service moved the men and equipment of an 
Army division 5,600 miles in about 63 hours; and the 
Air Force Tactical Air Command supplied a Composite 
Air Strike Force which flew across the ocean to pro- 
vide tactical air support to the division while in Europe. 

The^ Secretary of Defense told Congress in January 
that: "Our principal concern with regard to the Air 
Force tactical forces during the last three years has 
been the urgent need to build up adequate air support 
for the Army ground forces so that they could engage, 
if needed, in a sustained non-nuclear conflict." 

According to the Secretary of the Air Force: "The 
Air Force has learned a great deal in the past 20 years 
about airpower — keeping aircraft operational, exploit- 
ing aerial firepower through central flight control, and 
extending airpower resources by centralized manage- 
ment. We have the capability to satisfy the Army's re- 
quirements." 

The rate of procurement of Air Force tactical fighters 
and reconnaissance aircraft has been increased from 
180 in 1962 to 435 in fiscal year 1964. In fact, the 
increase in tactical fighter squadrons since 1961, ac- 
cording to the Secretary of Defense, has been 33 per 
cent, and the increase in airlift capability has been 75 
percent. 

The Air Reserve Forces in 1963 provided better than 
12 percent of the total Air Force airlift requirement. 

The "Ready Now" units of the Air Reserve Forces 
made substantial gains in personnel strength during 
the year. After two Reserve mobilizations (Berlin and 
Cuba), the Air National Guard strength climbed to 
an all-time high of some 75,000. The Air Force Re- 
serve also made giant gains and is expected to reach a 

SUMMARY / next page 




11AF 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 

THE AIR RESERVIST 

AIR RESERVE RECORDS CENTER 

DENVER, COLORADO 80205 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 



DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR fOM 
POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 



USAF Recurring 

No. 30-H-3-64-3 



SUMMARY / continued 

total pay-roll-strength of 61,000 this year. 

There also has been an increase during the past 
year in the Special Air Warfare Forces for counter- 
insurgency and civic action operations. Special air 
warfare units are deployed in the Republic of Viet- 
Nam, where they are training units of the Viet-Nam 
Air Force (VNAF). 

Because relative military strength never remains un- 
changed, it is necessary to keep ahead of a potential 
aggressor in technology. Aerospace research, develop- 
ment and engineering have absorbed a significant por- 
tion of all Air Force-managed funds and people. 

The President's report to Congress in 1963 U. S. 
Aeronautics and Space Activities, shows a record of 
"about 60" satellite payloads placed in orbit — 10 
launched for NASA projects and about 50 by the Air 
Force for Department of Defense projects. 

Air Force Systems Command, during the year, con- 
tinued to provide a large measure of support to NASA 
in terms of facilities, technically trained personnel and 
test and launch assistance. 

Consistent with its current responsibilities for all 
Department of Defense space developments, the Air 
Force was assigned further space tasks during the past 



year. Among these were the coordination of plannin 
of ICBM and space vehicle tracking activities at de 
fense facilities in Florida and California; and develop 
ment responsibility for the Manned Orbiting Labonj 
tory (MOL) program. 

Although deeply involved in missile and space oj 
erations for the nation, the Air Force remains also e> 
tremely active in its long-time specialty of aviatioi 
It is, in fact, increasing its yearly pilot training rat 
from 1,500, right now, to 1,700 beginning in July. 

Air Force pilots flew something like 6,500,000 houi 
in 1963, while setting a new flying safety rate recor 
of 4.4 major aircraft accidents per 100,000 flying houn 

While performing all these activities in the air an 
in space the Air Force also reduced costs by carefi 
management. Audited Air Force cost reduction in fiscs 
year 1963 exceeded one billion dollars, more than ha 
the total defense reduction reported to the Presidei 
by the Secretary of Defense. 

At the same time that the Air Force is concentra 
ing on providing the Army with the airlift, close a 
support and battlefield reconnaissance it needs, it 
working on achieving new air and space systems fc 
offensive and defensive operations in any intensity ( 
conflict — high or low. 




12AF 







the air reservist 

OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE AIR RESERVE FORCES 



E 1964 






■ 



■ 



" 



■ • 



New 

Recovery 

Concept 



The Air Force has an- 
nounced plans to realign 
the Air Force Reserve Re- 
covery Program under 
new concepts designed to 
improve Air Force abil- 
ity to survive an attack 
and recover and reconsti- 
tute its forces afterward. 
The new concept makes 
the Recovery Program a 
part of Air Force survival 
plans and will integrate 
our recovery units closely 
into the operations of 
major Air Force com- 
mands (see RECOVERY, 
page 2). 



■I 



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451 U.S.A* 




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u 

R 

C 

V 
E 

R . . . depicts an important 
phase of the Air Force Re- 
serve's new Recovery con- 
cept. A rendition of an ac- 
tual photograph, it portrays 
a Recovery Reservist volun- 
tarily accomplishing one of 
the vital security aspects of 
pre-attack dispersal during 
the Cuba crisis. . . . 



the air reservist 

Vol. XVI— No. 4 June 1964 

AIR NATIONAL GUARD 
AIR FORCE RESERVE CIVIL AIR PATROL 

General Curtis E. LeMay 

Chief of Staff, United States Air Force 

Maj. Gen. Curtis R. Low 

Ass't Chief of Staff Reserve Forces, USAF 

EDITOR: 
Fred E. Giachino 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR: 
Thomas Wright Jr. 

STAFF WRITER: 
TSgt William J. Turner 

The Air Reservist is an official publication 

of Hq USAF approved by the Secretary 

of the Air Force in accordance 

with Section 278, Title 10, U. S. Code. This 

section requires the dissemination 

of complete and up-to-date information 

of interest to the Air Reserve Forces. 

Editorial Office: The Air Reservist, P.O. 
Box 423, Boiling AFB, Washington, D.C., 20332 

The material contained in The Air Reservist 

ii lifted in the Air University 

Periodical Index. 

Use of funds for printing this publication 

has been approved by Hq USAF. 




Reserve Flight Nurses (l-r) Capts. Margaret Jones and Norma Hendra, 31 
Aeromed Evac Sq, Miami, and Ma]. Anna Nalevanko, 33rd AMESq, Pit\ 
burgh, study exhibit at Aerospace Medical Association convention in Mian, 



RECOVERY / continued 

Each recovery unit will have a spe- 
cific mission to perform for one or 
more of the major commands in the 
event of a national emergency. 

A thorough study of the changes 
necessary to align the Recovery Pro- 
gram with the new Air Force con- 
cept has been in progress for several 
months. The first step was to deter- 
mine the wartime requirement of Air 
Force commands under the new con- 
cept and to re-design the Air Force 
Reserve Recovery Program to meet 
these needs. As a result, 40 Air Force 
Reserve Recovery groups and 91 
Air Force Reserve Recovery squad- 
rons, for which there is no longer a 
foreseeable military requirement, will 
phase out of the program by August 
31, 1964. Deactivations of some 
units will begin on June 30, 1964. 

Other realignment actions will in- 
clude readjustment of the personnel 
authorizations of remaining Air Force 
Reserve recovery units to match the 
manning level of each unit with the 
capability required by its specific mis- 
sion. Reservists currently assigned to 
units being deactivated or whose posi- 
tions are eliminated in subsequent 
authorization reviews may apply for 
reassignment to other Reserve Forces 
units where vacancies exist. 

Utilization of the Recovery Pro- 
gram under the new Air Force sur- 
vival plan includes the concept of 
pre-attack dispersal and post-attack 
regrouping of forces as well as the 
basic recovery function. Changes in 
the program are necessary also be- 
cause the new plan incorporates the 
use of some active Air Force re- 
sources as well as those of the Air 



Reserve Forces to support disperse 
recovery, and regroup operations. 

The original Air Force Reserj 
Recovery Program, consisting 
some 82 groups and 200 squadro; 
was implemented in 1960 prior 
completion of the Air Force survi^ 
plan in order to provide a nationwi, 
recovery capability at the earliest pi 
sible time. It was designed to furn;, 
a widespread structure, primarily 
civilian airfields, to recover militc 
aircraft which might be unable 
return to their home bases in 1 
event of enemy attack. 

The program was used during 1| 
Cuban crisis of; 1962 to support dj 
persal and deployment operations 
the active Air' Force and Army. T 
members of recovery units, who ft 
nished this support on a purely \\ 
untary basis, drew high praise frt 
the commanders whose forces wi 
involved. Their willingness, av< 
ability, and ability to accomplish 1 
tasks they were assigned contribut 
measurably toward the effectiven< 
of the active forces during the cri; 
Thus, the validity of the recow 
concept was proved. A list of the un 
to be deactivated is on page 7. 



A 



bout 300 active duty Air Foi 
officers and Air Force Reserve mq 
cal service personnel took part in 
Symposium held May 14th at Mia 
Beach, Florida. 

Representation by Regular a 
Reserve medical officers reflected 
common mission of the active di 
and Reserve forces, and set the p 
tern for remarks of key speakersi 

Lt. General E. J. Timbcrlake, cc 
niander, Continental Air Comma 



>sed the importance of the medi- 
program reorganization presently 
tig place in the Air Force Re- 
e, saying, ". . . the activation of 
Reserve Medical Service units 
is a showcase of what I think 
and should be done throughout 
entire Reserve." 

ir Force Surgeon General, Maj. 
eral Richard L. Bohannon; Brig, 
eral Larry A. Smith, surgeon Air 
ning Command, also gave indi- 
>n of the strong support of the 
'e establishment for the Air Force 
;rve medical program. 



nother conference attended 
lembers of the Regular Air Force 
Air Reserve Forces also stressed 
importance of the role played 
Reservists in the "total force" 
:ture. The meeting was the third 
lal Air Force Communications 
ice Reserve Forces conference 
rlando AFB, Florida, April 20. 
;puty Commander in Chief of 
highly flexible, unified (Army 
Air Force) U. S. Strike Com- 
i (STRICOM), Lt. General 
e K. Holloway, said, "Reserve 
es are more ready than they 

were," and gave the U. S. Air 
e credit for pioneering this new 

of Reserve preparedness. Gen- 
Holloway based his appraisal on 
irst hand knowledge of Air Re- 
; Forces' augmentation capabil- 
luring last year's joint exercise 
ft Strike III." 
3NAC Commander, Lt. General 

Timberlake; Maj. General Ken- 

P. Bergquist, commander, Air 
e Communications Service; Maj. 
xal Curtis R. Low, assistant 

of staff, Reserve Forces; and 

General I. G. Brown, assistant 
, National Guard Bureau for 

also were speakers during the 
:rence. 



R national Guard tactical con- 
ind flying units took part in last 
h's joint Air Force-Army train- 
exercise, "Desert Strike," con- 
id by the U.S. Strike Command, 
17-30. 

:sert Strike involved approxi- 
ly 100,000 airmen and soldiers, 
lich 10,000 or 10 percent were 
f and Air National Guardsmen, 
vered a tri-state area compris- 
13-million acres of California, 
da and Arizona, 
ree tactical fighter squadrons 
; F-lOOs, F-86s and F-84s were 
id from volunteers throughout 
^ir National Guard. They were 



a part of the exercise's Mojave Force. 

Two Air Guard Tactical Control 
Groups, the 152nd of Roslyn ANG 
Station, New York and the 157th of 
St. Louis, Missouri, plus their squad- 
rons and flights from 12 states, fur- 
nished command communications for 
almost the entire exercise. 

The Air National Guard also fur- 
nished air transport support. 



ceding four years of service. Criteria 
for the award is contained in para- 
graph 30.1 of AFR 900-10. 



M, 



A 



new award, the Air Reserve 
Forces Meritorious Service Ribbon 
was established by the Air Force on 
April 7, 1964. 

The ribbon will be awarded only 
upon the specific recommendation of 
an individual's unit commander, for 
"exemplary behavior, efficiency and 
fidelity while serving in an enlisted 
status in the Air Reserve Forces." 
The new ribbon may be awarded any 
time after one year from the date of 
its establishment, based on the pre- 



.ore than 10,000 Army Na- 
tional Guardsmen are flying in Air 
National Guard transports to summer 
training sites and exercises in the U.S. 
and overseas this year in a precedent- 
setting training program known as 
"Guardlift I." 

The operation, aimed at raising 
the mobilization readiness of the Re- 
serve forces, will involve approxi- 
mately 7 Air Guard wings and 25 
groups flying some 200 four-engine 
aircraft. Their Army counterparts are 
being transported to 1 1 training areas 
in continental U. S. and Hawaii, Alas- 
ka and Puerto Rico. Army Guard 
units from Hawaii and Puerto Rico 
are being flown to the U. S. 

NEWS / page 6 




ANG F-84Fs beside C-97 await takeoff pom Puerto Rico in 
recent nonstop, overseas deployment "Shock Wave." [story pg. 6.] 



ANG's new McCallister Trophy is modified by MSgt Edward 
Betley. Model goes to best ANG C-97 unit at AFA convention. 







■ 



by Brig. Gen. I. G. Brown 

Assistant Chief, NGB, 
for Air National Guard 



THE AIR NATIONAL 

GUARD IS MORE THAN A 

WARTIME MOBILIZATION FORCE 




T 



HE DECISION — now some seven 
years old — to assign to the Air Re- 
serve Forces, clear-cut operational 
missions has had a dramatic, and in 
some ways totally unexpected effect. 

To state the matter bluntly, this 
decision, coupled with the events of 
the past few years has drastically 
changed the concept of the Air Na- 
tional Guard as a reserve force. Un- 
til a few years ago, the Air Force, 
like other military services, tradi- 
tionally had relied on the Air Guard 
to supply the extra manpower and 
capability needed for wartime expan- 
sion. But today the Air National 
Guard is much more than a wartime 
mobilization force; it is, in fact, a 
vital part of the aerospace force in 
being, in peace as well as in war. 
This change in concept made neces- 
sary a complete reorientation of the 
Guard's force composition and total 
nature of its training curriculum. 

We share with similarly organized 
elements of the Air Force Reserve 
a common, paradoxical problem. How 
to obtain the opportunity and the 
means to exploit a proven potential 
for performance of additional "ac- 
tual" and full-time missions, at a 
time when a major part of the public 
still thinks of the Air National Guard 
in terms of "weekend warriors." 

It is important to recognize that 
the broad term "public" here in- 
cludes all those within the Air Force 
itself who have had no opportunity 
to be closely associated with the Re- 
serve Forces. In this group we must 
include, also, those whose informa- 
tion concerning the Reserve Forces 
dates back many years. 

I here can be no question that 
this lack of "internal" information 



concerning both the capabilities and 
limitations of the Air National Guard, 
and the Air Reserve Forces generally, 
has always and still seriously impairs 
the ability of these forces to con- 
tribute to the Air Force mission. 

Those who think of us in terms 
of the immediate post World War II 
era no doubt would be shocked to 
learn that there are Air National 
Guard Ground Electronics Engineer- 
ing Installation Agency squadrons so 
far advanced in their training mission 
that they are repaying to the Govern- 
ment — in projects accomplished — as 
much as is spent on their upkeep. 

The contrast extends to the com- 
bat flying units, long the mainstem 
of the Air Guard, and now part of 
a more balanced air-ground team. 

The typical Air National Guard 
fighter squadron of the late 1940's 
operated largely on an evening-drill, 
voluntary weekend flying basis. What 
it accomplished during the year in 
terms of fully operational perform- 
ance was crowded into the annual 
"summer camp." And if bad weather 
intruded on the encampment period, 
we were out of luck. 

Contrast this with the current an- 
nual experience of one typical Air 
Guard tactical fighter squadron. 

Under Tactical Air Command re- 
quirements, each primary aircrew 
member of the squadron is author- 
ized to fly quarterly three events in 
these categories: dive bombing, skip 
bombing, rocketry, strafing and air- 
to-air Dart target. They also are re- 
quired to fly four aerial combat tac- 
tics missions and six different combat 
navigational profiles which simulate 
attacking enemy ground targets. In 
addition, they fly several other mis- 



cellaneous missions to maintain 
high level of proficiency. 

In the accomplishment of the 
and other requirements, this one A 
Guard fighter squadron flew, durii ; 
1963, 2,755 jet sorties. This a 
counted for 4,836 hours flying tim 
an average of 403 hours monthly. 

Just consider for a moment th 
until a few short years ago unit trai 
ing in the Air Guard, with the exc 
tion of annual field training, 
largely restricted to local areas, 
advancements in technology and 
signment of more modern and 
phisticated weapon systems to 
Air Guard, this concept of trair 
has become virtually obsolete. \ 
Guard heavy transport aircraftU 
global missions every day and ja 
in the past year the Guard has prove 
that long range, nonstop deplo] 
ments of our tactical units in 1 
Air Guard status are not only pa 
sible but are essential mediums 1 
which the active establishment a 
assess the Guard's true capability. I 

Obviously, a great deal has bei 
added since the days of the "Mq 
tang" and the "Jug." It is equal 
obvious that what is being accofl 
plished in year-round flying rests] 
a very broad base of expanded pt| 
ficiency in terms of maintenance f 
cilities, trained technicians and soul 
administration. 

From this base, the Air Guard h 
been able to expand into more j 
versified flying operations, accept! 
ground communications and electro 
ics missions of increasing complexil 

This expansion also has paid 1 
told dividends for the Air Fore 
An example is the just completi 
Exercise "Desert Strike." The I 



"It 's a vital part of the aerospace force in peace as well as in war.'* 



rd contributed its two tactical 
rol groups to the exercise pro- 
ng almost the entire command 
munications for both task forces, 
lout these two groups the exer- 
would probably have been ex- 
lely handicapped since the Air 
:e has only one other similar 
ip available and its members are 
mitted throughout the Free World. 
here were those, in 1949-1950, 
were certain the militia concept 
doomed as a useful factor in 
i century warfare. It -would be 
tlly foolish to assume that the 
;vements made in the 15 years 
; represent the ultimate of which 
modernized Militia is capable, 
he record of those past 15 years 
onstrates conclusively that the 
National Guard has measured up 
accessively higher standards and 
ions. Far from being doomed 
nilitia concept in the Air Guard 
come progressively closer to its 
nal form. With higher readiness 
irements than ever before the 
National Guard has gone back 
e days of the Minuteman. Today, 
rdsmen are ready to respond as 
dy as those original Minutemen 
dropped their plows at the sound 
e church bell in the square, 
le question now is "Where do 
;o from here?" We have a top- 
: force; second to none. We have 
every challenge thrown at us. 
next obvious area for us to ex- 
: is whether or not this force is 
I used to its fullest capability. 



In my opinion at the moment it 
is not. And a large reason for this 
is the communication lag. 

For this reason it becomes essen- 
tial that we let the public and the 
Air Force know what we can do so 
that every mission which we can per- 
form is assigned to us, leaving Air 
Force funds and manpower free for 
other programs. 

As just one example, where missile 
sites are close enough to centers of 
population — and they need not be 
large centers of population — the Air 
National Guard can organize the units 
to operate and maintain such sites for 
an indefinite period. This would not 
only provide a stable and efficient 
way to man these important sites but 
it would release funds that now are 
used for family housing, recreation 
and other personnel services for use 
where they will be of greater benefit 
to the Air Force family. 

The question remains in many 
minds, I am sure, of just how com- 
petent is the Air Guard to perform 
these missions? 

Competent enough, in the AC&W 
and fighter interceptor fields, for the 
Pacific Air Force to have turned over 
to the Hawaii Air National Guard 
the major responsibility for air de- 
fense of the island State. Competent 
enough in all fields to stand opera- 
tional readiness tests on the same 
basis as units of the active Air Force. 
The results of these tests are available 
to all commanders and planners in- 
terested in making better utilization 



2100 




it exercises give "internal" proof of Air Guard's augmentation ability. 
) Army Lt. Billy Cone, Navy Lt. George Strohsal, and Guardsmen, Lt. Col. 
iert Smith and Maj. James Carter "teamed" during exercise Desert Strike. 



of Air National Guard forces. They 
provide an exact indicator of just 
how we stand in relation to compar- 
able units of the active service. 

While we are proud of the results 
our units have achieved, in these and 
other evaluations, we are the first to 
admit that we operate under some 
very serious limitations, in addition 
to those one expects to encounter in 
a militia-type force. 

We know with certainty that our 
present, generally high level of per- 
formance would drop off sharply 
after sustained operations, due to the 
limitation imposed upon us in re- 
gard to equipment, personnel strength 
and overall support. 

During the mobilization of 1961- 
1962, the policy of gathering up 
"filler" personnel from far and near 
to correct budget-imposed strength 
limitations proved to be inefficient 
both as regards the needs of the unit, 
and the general effectiveness of the 
individual. Because of this, we are 
urging that our units be permitted to 
recruit to 100% of their UMD. I am 
happy to say that we have, in this 
effort, the enthusiastic support of 
many of the Air Force commanders 
under whom we would operate in 
time of war or lesser emergency. 

The Air Force is working with us 
in our continuing effort to seek more 
modern equipment such as the F-105 
aircraft that were recently delivered 
to the 108th Tac Fighter Wing at 
McGuire AFB, New Jersey. 

I am confident that the "marriage" 
of such equipment to the demon- 
strated competence of a fully manned 
Air National Guard unit will enable 
us not only to maintain already 
achieved standards, but increase our 
effectiveness from the first day of 
mobiliz